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Full text of "Athlete, The"

Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2011 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://www.archive.org/details/athletethe195758unse 




Hiqh khool AthMe 



DU PONT MANUAL HIGH SCHOOL BASEBALL TEAM 
K. H. S. A. A. CHAMPION - - 1957 











^ 111 a , Jf^ 



\ii. €^«s* 



(Left to Right) Front Row: Scott, Hussung, Meffert, Mattingiy, 
Grasch. Capt. Bisig, Booker, Cassady, Holton. Second Row: Coach Kimmel, 
B. Barrow, R. Barrow, Waltrip, Robinson, Rudolph, Rixman, Doak. Third 
Row: Greer, Campbell, Melear, Eddleman. Baugh, Pierce, Baker, Rice, Marr. 



Ofticial Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 
AUGUST - 1957 



Kentucky High School Track Meet 

Lexington, Kentucky, May 17-18, 1957 
ST. XAVIER HIGH SCHOOL TRACK TEAM— K.H.S.A.A. CHAMPION— 1957 




Bill Anfonini, Bill Smith, Charles Will, Jim Ebert, Tom Lewis, 
cond Row: Woodv Zorn, Ted Penner, Charles Edwards, J. Vander- 
haar. i:harles French, .lerrv Cambron, Francis .laudzems. Bill Burmester. Third Row: Bill Walsh, Jim 
Parrott, Howard Webb, Art Janes, .!. Guarnasclielli, Charles Wirth, Jim Finney. Fourth Row: Frank 
Bickel, Sebastian Rappa, Bob Spann, Pat Rvan, Rav Shook, Charles Miles, Robert Hanks, Walt Fang- 
man. Fifth Row: John Parker, .lim McMahon, Dick Mueller, Ralph Wirth, Bob Bearden, Tom West- 
meier, Capt. .Mm Reader, Coach, .lohrnv Meihatis. 



120 Yard Hurdles— 

1. Han-is — Barbour ville 

2. Vaughn— M.M.I. 

3. Hammond — Bardstown 

4. Piatt— Lafayette 

5. Abbott — Eastern 

Time: 16.1 
100 Yard Dash— 

1. Parker— St. Xavier 

2. Smith— Central 

3. McGee — Hopkinsville 

4. Jones — Newport 

5. Lee — Beechwood 

Time: 10.2 
Mile Run — 

1. Joseph — Shawnee 

2. Baxter — Lafayette 

3. Cleaver — Bourbon Co. 

4. Snawder — Fern Creek 

5. Manasco — Crofton 

Time: 4:37.5 
880 Yard Relay— 

1. duPont Manual 

2. Central 

3. Hopkinsville 

4. Highlands 

5. Eastern 

Time 1:32.8 
440 Yard Dash — 

1. Taylor— Central 



2. Baker — Dixie Heights 

3. Cambron — St. Xavier 

4. Filer — Lafayette 

5. Kincaid — Trinity 

Time: 51.9 
180 Yard Hurdles- 

1. Reader — St. Xavier 

2. Vaughn— M. M. I. 

3. Smith — Shawnee 

4. Rodgers — Madisonville 

5. Southerland — Eastern 

Time: 20.8 
880 Yard Run— 

1. Cleaver — Bourbon Co. 

2. Simpson — Eastern 

3. McMillan— Scott Co. 

4. Witham — Dixie Heights 

5. Spencer — Central 

Time: 2:03.5 
220 Yard Dash— 

1. Parker— St. Xavier 

2. Smith — Central 

3. McGee — Hopkinsville 

4. Henson — Southern 

5. Lee — Beechwood 

Time: 22.1 
Mile Relay— 

1. St. Xavier 

2. Ashland 

3. Paducah Tilghman 



4. Central 

5. St. Joseph 

Time: 3:35.4 
Shot Put— 

1. Moraja — St. Joseph 

2. Mendell — Bellevue 

3. Martin— K. M. L 

4. Cissell — Manual 

5. Motseholl — St. Joseph 

Distance: 49' 8%" 

Pole Vault— 

1. Ruff — Henderson 

1. Page — Eastern 

3, Sadosky — Hi.ghlands 

3, McAtee— Highlands 

5. Piatt— Lafayette 

5. Crawford— k. M. I. 

Height: 11' 6" 

Discus — 

1. Martin— K. M. I. 

2. Clark— Tilghman 

3. Cissell — Manual 

4. Ramsey — Glasgow 

5. Parker— St. Xavier 

Distance: 145' 
Broad Jump — 

1, Smith— Tilghman 

2, Mueller— St. Xavier 

3, Taylor — Central 
(Continued on Page Sixteen) 



10%' 



7726 Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XX— NO. 1 



AUGUST, 1957 



1.00 Per Year 



Report of Audit 

Louisville, Kentucky. July 22. 1!)57 
Mr. Theodore A. Sanford, Secretary & Treasurer 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 
Le.xington, Kentucky 
Dear Sir: 

Pursuant to instructions received, we have made an audit 
of the books and records of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL 
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION for the period of one year be- 
ginning July 1, 1956, and ending June 30, 1957. In addition, 
we have prepared and attached hereto, statements of the Re- 
ceipts and Disbursements, which, in our opinion, reflect the 
true financial condition of the Association as of .lune 30, 1957. 
The Cash Funds on Hand and U. S. Savings Bonds Accounts 
were found to be correct and verified by letter from your de- 
positories. 

We find the records presented to us for the purpose of 
audit to be in agreement and in good condition. 
Respectfully submitted, 
JOHNSON-FOWLER & COMPANY 
By Huet L. Johnson 
Certified Public Accountant 

KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL 
ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

PERIOD FROM JULY 1, 19.56 TO JUNE .SO. 1957 
STATEMENT OF 
RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
RECEIPTS: 

Balance in Checking Account July I, 1956 $ 15.789.01 

Annual Dues - 436 (.< $3.00 $ 1,308.00 

Officials' Dues — 

Football - 346 (S $3.00 1.038.00 

Basketball - 1078 (« $3.00 3,234.00 

Reciprocity Officials — 

Football - 27 w $1.00 27.00 

Basketball - 18 i./ $1.00 18.00 

Officials' Fines - 21 lu $5.00 105.00 

School Fines - 8 ui $5.00 40.00 

Redeposits (Bad checks made good) 27.00 

Advertising in Magazine 800.00 

Sale of Rulels Books 143.00 

Sale of Equipment 27.00 

Ticket Sales - Annual Meeting 137.50 

Interest Received from Government Bonds 250.00 
Interest Received from First Federal 

Loan Association 75.00 

Transferred from Union Federal Loan 

Association Savings Account 10.000.00 

Transferred from State Basketball 

Tournament Account 100.328.95 

Receipts - State Baseball Tournament 646.00 118.204.45 

133.993.46 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Board of Control Expense $ 4.523.48 

Commissioner's Salary (Base Sal., $10,500) 8,254.52 

Expense - Commissioner's Office 235.40 

Ass't Commissioner's Salary 

(Base Sal.. $7,500) 6,338.14 

Travel Expense - Ass't Commissioner 468.36 

Clerical Help 4,450.39 

Janitor Service 693.10 

Postage 1,601.00 

Office Supplies 415.85 

•Janitor Supplies 221.41 

Purchase of New Equipment 719.45 

Insurance 254.60 

Equipment Repairs and Service Contracts 343.35 

Building Repairs 127.01 

Utilities 698.62 

Telephone and Telegraph 964.94 

Investigations - Board of Control 83.00 

Fidelity Bonds 42.50 

Printing 2,252.63 

Appropriation to Kentucky Coaches 

Charity Ass'n. 500.00 

Purchase of National Federation 

Publications 1,664.87 



Delegates to National Federation 

Meetings 3,878.10 

National Federation Dues 115.80 

Girls Division— N.S.G.W.S. 300.00 

Rental on Films 383.40 

Audit 50.00 

Bad Checks 30.00 

Meals - Annual Banquet 1.402.50 

Speaker - Annual Banquet 50.00 

Taxes: 

Federal Income Tax Withheld_^$3.277.80 

Social Security 646.54 

City Income Tax Withheld 305.07 

State Income Tax Withheld __ 598.01 
Hospitilization Withheld 177.45 5.004.87 

Transfer of Funds: 

To Savings Accounts 20,000.00 

To K.H.S.A.A. Protection Fund 21.000.00 

U. S. Treasury Certificates __ 10,051.55 51.051.55 

Magazine: 

Printing and Engraving 3,392.73 

Mailing 75.00 3.467.73 

Officials' Division: 

Honorariums and expenses - 

Clinics 1,092.39 

Printing and Miscellanous 

Expense 60.20 

School for Basketball Officials 1.035.85 
Expenses - Regional Basketball 

Clinics 318.46 

Officials' Emblems 351.35 2.858.25 

Swimming: 

Expenses - State Swimming 

Committee 126.50 

Trophies and Medals 

(State Meet) 422.20 

Officials (State Meet) 162. 7S 

Mileage and Local Enter- 
tainment (State Meet) 1.390.96 2.102.44 

Golf: 

Mileage and Local Entertain- 
ment (State Tournament) ___ 832.35 

Trophies and Awards 646.58 

Miscellaneous Expenses 16.88 1.495.71 

Tennis: 

Mileage and Local Entertain- 
ment (State Tournament) __ 832.35 

Trophies and Balls 847.88 

Miscellaneous Expenses 29.80 

Refund on Expenses - 

National Tournament 100.00 1.181.83 

Track : 

Regional Expense 233.51 

Trophies and Medals 1,879.98 

State Committee Expense 441.12 

Officials 535.00 

Mileage and Local Entertain- 
ment (State Meet) 5,208.30 

Miscellaneous Expenses 

(State Meet) 55.50 

New Equipment 396.78 

Labor (State Meet) 22.05 

State Clinic 68.50 8,840.74 

Baseball : 

Refunds on District Tourna- 
ment Deficits 3.228.23 

Trophies and Awards 1.279.78 

Refunds on Regional Tour. 

Deficits 433.11 

Baseballs (State Tournament). 99.00 

Transportation (State Tourna- 
ment) 483.84 

Meals (State Tournament) _._ 960.00 

Ticket Sellers and Takers 

(State Tournament) 60.00 

(Continued on Page Four) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1957 



AUGUST, 1957 



VOL. XX— NO. i 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1956-60), Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1953-67), Marion 

Directors — W. B. Jones (1953-57) Somerset; W. H. Crowdus 

(1964-58), Franklni: Jack Dawson (1954-5X), Louisville: 
Robert P. Forsylhe (1966-69), Greenville; K. G. Gillaspie 
(1965-69), Georgetown; Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



Jrom the Commissionel s CJffi 



ice 



Protection Fund Changes 

Administrators and coaches will be interested in 
the numerous imprpovements and changes which 
have been made in K.H.S.A.A. Protection Fund 
regulations for the forthcoming 1957-58 school 
year. 

Although the Schedule of Benefits for ordinary 
claims will be essentially the same as that which 
has been used for the last two or three years, the 
ceiling on "special" claims has been raised from 
$150.00 to $500.00. The football fee has been in- 
creased to only $3.00 per participant, while Physical 
Education has been added to the "All Sports Except 
Football" coverage with no increase in the fee of 
$1.00. The football fee includes coverage for spring 
practice, which has been true for several years. 

In order to simplify the Protection Fund plan, 
the dental examination has been eliminated. It will 
not be necessary for the principal to submit Form 
No. 7, Statement of Coach, in filing' claims with 
the Protection Fund. The protection will go into 
effect on each player as of the date on which he is 
examined. The principal may file the names of 
his players only once each month if he so desires. 
It will not be necessary to submit examination cards 
in support of claims. 

The Board of Control in its April meeting voted 
a dividend credit out of the State Basketball Tourna- 
ment funds in the amount of $30.00 to each school 
insuring its athletes in the K.H.S.A.A. Protection 
Fund for 1957-58. The action of the Board is equiva- 
lent to giving coverage to each K.H.S.A.A. member 
school for thirty players in "Physical Education 
and All Sports except Fotoball." This is the sixth 
year in which a dividend has been declared by the 
Board. The dividend may be applied only as a Pro- 
tection Fund credit. Principals of member schools 
maintaining football have been mailed a supply of 
Protection Fund examination cards and summary 
sheets. 

Football Clinics 

The 1957 clinics for football officials will be con- 
ducted by Mr. Thomas P. Bell and Mr. Edgar Mc- 
Nabb, who have attended meetings of the National 
Federation Football Committee. The dates and sites 
of the nine meetings ar as follows: August 13, Pine- 
viUe High School, 8:00 P. M. (EST); August 14, 
Pikeville High School, 8:00 P. M. (EST); August 
15, Ashland Y.M.C.A., 8:00 P. M. (EST); August 
18, K.H.S.A.A. Building, Lexington, 8:00 P. M. 
(CDT); August 19, Newport High School, 8:00 P. M. 
(EST); August 19, Bowling Green High School, 



8:00 P. M. (CST); August 20, Mayfield High School, 
8:00 P. M. (CST) August 21, Henaerson High School, 
8:00 P. M. (CDT); August 2(3, Louisville, 8:00 P. M. 
(CDT). 

Registration of Officals 
Previously registered football and basketball of- 
ficials have received their renewal application cards 
for the 1957-58 school year. Approximately seventy- 
five officials failed to file their 1956-57 reports on 
or before the deadline set by the Board of Control 
for the submitting of reports, and it was necessary 
to impose a fine on each official who thus failed to 
comply v\'ith Association rules. It is an Assocaition 
requirement that each registered official attend a 
clinic in the sport in which he is registered. Sixteen 
football officials and thirty-nine basketball officials 
were suspended in 195(i-57 for failure to attend 
clinics. Unless an official plans to attend one or 
more clinics during the season and to file his re- 
port on member schools promptly at the end of 
the season, he should not apply for registration in 
the Officials' Division of the Association. 
Mr. Litchfield Repeats 

Supt. Louis Litchfield of the Crittenden Coun- 
ty Schools was re-elected vice-president of the 
Board of Control at the summer meeting of the 
Board, held on July 27. On July 1, Mr. Litchfield 
began a new four-year term on tne Board. 

Several articles concerning Mr. Litchfield's 
educational activities have appeared in the 
ATHLETE at various times. He is a graduate of 
the Blackford High School and of Murray State 
College. He had teaching and coaching assignments 
at Blackford, Fredonia, Cobb, Nebo, Farmersville, 
and Francis. Immediately prior to the time of 
his current superintendency, he was principal of 
the Crittenden County High School at Marion. Mr. 
Litchfield was a "certified" basketball official for 
many years, and he was a State Tournament referee 
four times. He is currently a member of the Board 
of Regents of Murray State College. He is a 
deacon of the Marion Baptist Church. 

Southeastern Conference Regulations 

From the office of Commissioner Bernie Moore 
of the Southeastern Conference comes information 
concerning recent changes in rules and policies of 
both the Southeastern Conference and the NCAA 
in regard to recruiting. Briefly, these changes are: 

1. No visit or trip shall exceed two days and 
two nights. 

2. No contact with prospective student ath- 
lete at the school without permission of the high 
school principal or his representative. 

3. No trips or entertainment that will cause 
prospective student athlete to miss classroom work 
without permission of high school principal. 

A- No trips or entertainment imm-ediately 
prior to "signing date" that can possibly be con- 
strued as "hiding" a prospect. 

5. No trips or entertainment for prospective 
student athlete until after the last day of classes 
of his junior year in high school. 

In a letter written to the State Office of the 
K.H.S.A.A. on March 26, 1957, Commissioner Moore 
said: 

"At the last annual meeting of the Southeast- 
ern Conference, the following rule was passed: 'The 
traveling expenses of a prospective student athlete 
for any purpose shall not be furnished by a mem- 
ber institution or by anyone other than those on 
whom he is legally dependent prior to the last day 
of classes of his junior year in high school.' 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1957 



Page Three 



"The purpose of this rule was to assist high 
school coaches and principals in disciplinary pi'ob- 
lems connected with these young- football players 
being travelled over the Southeastern Conference 
area before their senior year. 

"I wish to point out that the prospective student 
may be penalized for violation of this rule — in- 
eligibility for the prospect at the institution which 
he visits." 

Minutes of Board Meeting 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association met at the Beechwood 
High School, South Fort Mitchell, Kentucky, on 
Saturday morning', July 27, 1957. The meeting was 
called to order by President Russell Williamson at 
9:30, with all Board members. Commissioner Theo. 
A. Sanfoi'd, and Assistant Commissioner J. B. Mans- 
field present. 

Jack iDawson moved, seconded by W. H. Crow- 
dus, that the reading of the minutes of the April 
27th meeting be waived, since the members of the 
Board had received copies of these minutes. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

President Williamson stated that nominations 
were in order for the vice-presidency of the Board 
of Control. W. H. Crowdus nominated Louis Litch- 
field for vice-president, and the nomination was 
seconded by Cecil A. Thornton.. K. G. Gillaspie 
moved, seconded by W. B. Jones, that the nomina- 
tions close, and that Mr. Litchfield be elected by 
acclamation. All voted "aye" on this motion ex- 
cept Mr. Litchfield, who did not vote. 

The Commissioner made a report to the Board 
on the receipts and disbursements of the K.H.S.A.A. 
and the K.H.S.A.A. Protection Fund for the year 
1956-57. He presented copies of the audit, recently 
prepared by the Johnson-Fowler Company of Louis- 
ville. Total funds on hand June .30, 1957, were re- 
ported as being $76,951.21. He stated that a com- 
plete break-down on receipts and expenses would 
appear in a forthcoming issue of the magazine. 
W. B. Jones moved, seconded by Louis Litchfield, 
that the report of the Commissioner be accepted 
and approved. The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner presented a proposed 
K.H.S.A.A. budget for the year 1957-58, vdth es- 
timated receipts of .$97,300.00, and estimated dis- 
bursements of $94,855.00. After a discussion of 
the various budget items, K. G. Gillaspie moved, 
seconded by Jack Dawson, that the 1957-58 
K.H.S.A.A. budget, as presented by the Commis- 
sioner, be adopted. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

W. B. Jones, who had been asked by President 
Williamson and other members of the Board of 
Control to make a study concerning the present 
retirement program for the Commissioner and the 
Assistant Commissioner, gave a report on proposed 
changes in the program. After the report had 
been made and after a general discussion. K. G. 
Gillaspie moved, seconded by Louis Litchfield, that 
the Board of Control accnt t^ie report and recom- 
mendations of Director W. B. Jones with respect 
to the nresent retirement system, and that a com- 
mittee be apoointed to act for the Association in 
the matter of working out the details of the retire- 
ment program. The motion was crried unan- 
imously. K. G. Gillaspie moved, seconded bv Louis 
Litchfield, that Director W. B. Jones be commended 
for his excellent report, and that the other mem- 
bers of the Board express their appeciation to Mr. 



St. Xavier's Championship Tennis Teann 




(Left to Right) Brother Valens. Coach: Jim Spencer, 
member of the doubles championship team : Billy Cooper, 
state singles champion; .loe Imorde. of the doubles team. 

Jones for the many days spent in preparing his 
report. The motion was carried. 

W. H. Crowdus, Chairman of the Football 
Championship Committee, reported that he was 
receiving information from other state associa- 
tions which sponsor football championships. He 
stated that his committee would make a report to 
the Board of Control at a subsequent meeting. 

Louis Litchfield and K. G. Gillaspie, delegate 
and alternate respectively to the National Federa- 
tion annual meeting, held in Miami Beach, Florida, 
on June 26-29, 1957, gave short reports on the 
meeting. 

With respect to the adoption of a plan for 
selection of district and regional basketball tourna- 
ment trophies, sevei-al members of the Board ex- 
pressed the opinion that the general plan used 
for trophy selection in 1956-57 had been satisfac- 
tory. W. B. Jones moved, seconded by W. H. 
Crowdus, that the Board of Control adopt the same 
plan in the selection of district and regional tour- 
nament trophies as the one used during 1955-56 
and 1956-57, that the trophy specifications be iden- 
tical with the specifications for 1956-57, and that 
the Commissioner be authorized to receive trophy 
bids. The motion was carried unanimously. 

W. B. Jones moved, seconded by Jack Dawson, 
that the next meeting of the Board of Control be 
held in Lexington on October 5. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

Cecil A. Thointon moved, seconded by W. H. 
Crowdus, that all bills of the Association, begin- 
ning April 27, 1957, and ending July 26, 1957, be 
allowed. The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Board was then called to order in its 
capactiy as Board of Directors of the K.H.S.A.A. 
Protection Fund. 

W. B. Jones moved, seconded by Jack Dawson, 
that the officers and directors of the K.H.S.A.A. 
Protection Fund be the same as the officers and 
directors of the Kentucky High School Athletic 
Association, namely, Russell Williamson, President; 
Louis Litchfield, Vice-President; Theo. A. Sanford, 
Secretary-Treasurer: and W. H. Crowdus, Jack 
Dawson, Robert P. Forsythe, K. G. Gillaspie, W. B. 
Jones, and Cecil A. Thornton, Directors. The mo- 
tion was carried unanimously. 

(Continued on Page Sixteen) 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1957 



REPORT OF AUDIT 

(Continued from Page One) 



Lodsing (State Tournament) __ 
Scorer (State Tournament) __ 
Umpires (State Tournament) _ 
Expenses - Assistant Manager 

(State Tournament) 

Films 



449.00 
27.00 
210.00 

29.00 
310.00 
59.00 
15.00 



3,000.00 $127,709.00 



Receipts $133,993.46 

Disbursements 127,709.00 



Cash Balance 

BANK RECONCILEMENT: 

Balance per Bank Statement, June 
Less Outstanding Checks : 



6,284.46 

_$ 6,889.52 



No 


429 


No 




No 


488 _. 


No 


511 


No 


522 


No 




No 


614 . 


No 


674 


No 


676 


No 




No 


678 


No 


679 


No 


680 


No 




No. 


682 



47.85 
43.79 
Void 
Void 
Void 
Void 

104.19 
2.03 
24.00 
3.36 
17.00 
73.95 
40.00 

150.19 
92.20 
6.50 



True Bank Balance Juns 30, 1957 

FUNDS ON HAND: 

Cash Balance - First National 

Bank & Trust Company_^$ 6,284.46 
V. S. Savings Bonds 

(Value June 30. 1957) ^__ 33,650.00 
Savings .Account - First Federal 

Savings & Loan Ass'n 10,000.00 

Savings Account - Union 

Federal Savings & Loan 

Ass'n (Henderson) 10,000.00 

LT. S. Treasury Certificates 

(Value on June 30, 1957)__ 9,971.88 
K.H.S.A.A. Protection Fund__ 7.044.87 



Total Funds on Hand, 
June 30, 1957 



$76,951.21 

Estimated Value of K.H.S.A.A. 

Building and Equipment __ $99,083.20 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
1957 STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 
RECEIPTS: 

Ticket Sales .$131,022.00 

Profit on Program 2,748.81 

Radio 2,160.00 $135,930.81 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Printing 901.23 

Trophies and Awards 652.98 

Postage 152.12 

Refunds on Tickets 14.00 

Public Liahility Insurance 1,218.14 

Tncidental Expenses - (16 Teams) 4,800.00 

Transportation 1.379.00 

lodging 3.282.80 

Meals 5,836.55 

Coliseum Rental 8.000.00 

Organist 40.00 

Officials' Fees and Expenses 1.489.20 

S-orers and Timers 400.00 

.sihot Chart Keepers and Statisticians 200.00 

TTshers 1.440.00 

Ticket Sellers. Ti-ket Takers, and Guards 3,245.00 

P"hlic Address Announcers 125.00 

TBlephone and Telegraph 65.24 

Films 190.00 

Towel Service 39.75 

Additional Clerical Help - Ticket Sales__ 301.25 



Miscellaneous Expenses - Tour 

Manager 25.40 

Honorariums and Expenses - Ass't Tourna- 
ment Managers 910.20 

Bad Checks 80.00 

Detective Service 779.00 

Armored Car Service 10.00 

Audit 25.00 35,601.86 

Transfer of Funds - Amount Transferred 

to K.H.S.A.A. as Tournament Profit__ $100,328.95 

RECEIPTS AND DISBURSEMENTS 
K.H.S.A.A. PROTECTION FUND 
JULY 1, 1956 TO JUNE 30, 1957 
RECEIPTS: 

Balance in Checking Account 

Julv 1, 1956 $ 641.80 

Football Fees - 3716 la $2.50 $ 9,288.00 

Fees for All Sports Except 

Football - 6356 (n $1.00 6,356.00 

Physical Education Fees - 

95 (o $.50 47.50 

15,691.50 

Less Credit Allowed 7,963.00 $ 7,728.50 

Officials' Insurance Fees 

Football - 34 c. $2.50 85.00 

Basketball - 44 i.; $1.00 44.00 129.00 

Cash Transferred from 

K.H.S.A.A. Account 21.000.00 

28,857.50 

Total Receipts $29,499.30 

DISBURSEMENTS: 

Printing $ 295.00 

Claims Paid: 

Football 14,188.82 

Basketball 5,547.99 

Baseball 398.09 

Track 103.25 

Clerical Help 1,526.15 

Taxes: 

Federal Income Tax Withheld 266.90 ' 

Social Security 80.56 

State Income Tax Withheld_„ 24.53 

City Income Tax Withhelld __ 23.14 

$22,454.43 

Cash Balance in Bank $ 7,044.87 

PANK RECONCILEMENT: 

Balance per Bank Statement, 

June 30, 1957 $7,581.54 

Less Outstanding Checks : 

No. 763 $ 26.00 

No. 809 6.00 

No. 889 20.00 

No. 899 15.00 

No. 915 51.50 

No. 925 8.00 

No. 927 10.00 

No. 932 27.50 

No. 937 9.00 

No. 943 41.75 

No. 944 72.25 

No. 945 33.25 

No. 946 25.00 

No. 952 129.00 

No. 953 4.02 

No. 954 3.60 

No. 955 54.80 536.67 

True Balance .June 30, 1957 $7,044.87 

St. Xavier Golf Team Wins State Tournament 

The St. Xavier High School golf team won the 1957 State 
High School Golf Tournament with the low score of 622. The 
tournament was held at Ft. Knox on May 28-29. and was 
managed by Coach John Hackett. The Shawnee High School 
team was runner-up with a score of 644, and Flaget was third 
with 662. 

Frankie Beard of St. Xavier was individual champion, 
with a score of 148, Rich Casabella, of Flaget was runner-up 
with a score of 162, and Ronnie Curry of Eastern was third 
with a score of 154. 

Hall of Paintsville was first in the putting contest, with 
Demling of Trinity second. Demling won the annroaching con- 
test, and Schnurr of St. Xavier was second- In the driving 
contest Ryan of Trinity was first and Settle of Owensboro 
was second. 

A summary of the individual scores is as follows : 

148— Beard (St. Xavier) 

152— Casabella (Flaget) 

154 — Curry (Eastern) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1957 



Page Five 



St. Xavier's Championship Golf Team 

F^ ^ f^ ^% 




(Left to Right) 



165— Hale (Mayfield) 

166— McNamara (Danville), 
Knox). Royal (Southern) Schn 

157— F. Settle (Owensboro) 

169 — Ahern (St. Xavier), 
(Fulton) 

160— Wyatt (Shawnee). Knight (Danville) 

161— Owen (Shi 



Hall (Paintsville 
uiT (St. Xavier) 
. Little (Sha 
Schneider (St. 



Dale (Ft. 
r), White 



162— Will 

163— Pari 
well County) 

164 — Patrick (Manual), Atherton (Southern), Harmon 
(Danville), Harrison (Cumberland), Reeves (Shawnee) 

166— MetzKer (Shawnee). C. Traxel (Maysvillel. Kirk 
(Maysvillei, Brown (Owensboro) 

167— Jones (Dixie Heights). Ryan (St. .Toseph). Lally 
(St. Xavier). Young (Owensboro) 

168— Miller (Atherton). Fitzpatrick (Flaget). Ethington 
(Shelbyville). Beach (Franklin-Simpson), Caywood (Harlan) 

169— T. Settle (Owensboro) 

170— Wheeler (Glasgow). Floden (Malel. P. Van Hoose 
(Paintsville), Jaeger (Flaget). Tarter (Atherton). Coad (Man- 
ual). Kettenacker (Dixie Heights). Eblen (Dixie Heights) 

171 — Holman (Male), Endicott (Eastern), Jones (Bowling 



Gr 



172- 



(Cumberland) 



(Flaget). Diehln 



173— Berry (Flaget), Co 
ern) 

174-JSmith (Eastern), 
(Rincyvillel, Demling (Trini 
Belotf I Mayfield) 

175 -Crutcher 
man (Trinity) 

176— H. VanH( 

177— Ryan 



Dwensboro). Pfeiffer (East 

Traxe 
Booki 



(Maysville). Fussel 
( Franklin-Simpson ) , 



(Atherton). Stewart (Cumberland). Veene- 



( Paintsville) 
rinity). Belcher (Bowling Gi 
(Trinity). Bushart (Fulton) 
Heights ) 

170— Wheeler (Glasgow). Floden (Male). 

181— Combs (Maysville) 

182— Peonies (Atherton) 

183— Cockrell (Danville), Pope (Male) 

185— McLaughlin (Eastern) 

186— Chandler (Shelbyville) 

191— Mann (Dixie Heights). Ferrell (Trir 

192— Stewart (Cumberland), Richardson I 

201— Ray (Bowling Green) 



Twenty-Fifth Annual Kentucky High School Tennis Tournament 

Shawnee Park, Louisville - May 20 - 21, 1957 

SINGLES ,4\; 



Cooper - St. Xavier 


QUARTER-FINALS 

Cooper - 6-4; 6-1 


SEMI-FINALS 


Brown - Covington 


Cooper - 


Craig - 6-1; 6-0 




7-5; 1-6; 6-4 


Craig - Glasgow 


Cohen - 
1-6; 7-5; 6-3 




Hensley - Hazel Green 


Leurck - 6-4; 8-6 


Hornbuckle - Valley 


Leurck - Bellevue 


Cohen - 6-4; 6-1 




Switzer - University 








Cohen - K. M. L 


Hamilton - 
6-1; 6-0 




Hamilton - St. Xavier 




Poteet - Glasgow 


Hamilton - 


Meyer - 6-3; 6-3 

Russell - 6-3; 6-1 

England - 
6-3; 4-6; 6-4 


Meyer - Bellevue 


6-0; 6-4 

England - 
4-6; 6-1; 6-1 


Donan - Central 


Russell - Flaget 


Cox - University 




England - Atherton 




Roth - Covington 





FINALS 

Cooper - 6-3; 6-1 



Hamilton 
6-0; 8-6 



Cooper - 6-0; 6-1 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1957 



St. Xavier 



Bellevue 



Glasgow 



Shawnee 



K. M. I. 



Hazel Green 



Flaget 



Covington 



TENNIS DOUBLES 
SEMI-FINALS 

St. Xavier - 6-3; 6-2 



FINALS 





- 6-1; 6-4 
6-1; 6-1 


St. Xavier - 8-6; 6-4 


St. Xavier 


6-1; 




Shawnee 


K. M. I - 0-6; 7-5; 6-4 


6-0 


K. M. I. 















Covington - 8-6; 6-1 



Schools' Ratings on Basketball Officials 



The following ratings were received on basketball officials 
registered with the K.H.S.A.A. during 1956-57. The numbers 
following each name represent respectively the number of 
Excellent, Good. Fair, and Poor ratings given to the official. 

Able, Forest, 2-1-0-1 : Adkins, Alec K., 0-1-1-0 : Adkins, 
Raymond C, 11-22-1-0 ; Adkins, Tom, 13-25-2-2 ; Akins, Charlie, 
1.11-4-0: Akridge, Dean, 7-8-1-0: Alexander, Rex E., 8-7-0-0; 
Alexander, William F.. 0-3-0-0 : Alford, William C, 0-5-1-1 ; 
Alen, Henry L., 3-2-0-0 ; Allen, .Tack, 6-19-3-3 : Allen, James 
W. "Dink", 1-0-0-0: Allen, Nelson R.. 1-6-1-1; Allen, Stanley 
M. 0-0-2-0 ; Almond, Alvin, 5-7-0-0 ; Almond, Bennett M., 
0-3-1-0 : Alwes, Donald Ray. 0-1-1-0 : Amburgey, Jesse Lee, 
0-1-1-0 : Anderson, Elmer D., 1-0-1-0 : Anthony, Kenneth, 
0-0-1-0; Ark, Billie D.. 0-2-0-0; Arnold. Kenneth. 11-23-7-0; 
Arnold. Marvin R.. 6-0-0-0 : Arnzen. Stanley. 0-1-0-0 : Ashley, 
Kenneth, 2-6-4-2 : Austin, Bruce E., 2-13-7-3. 

Bach, Bert C 0-1-0-0 ; Back, Adrian G.. Jr.. 1-9-6-1 : Bailey, 
Arville. 3-16-1-1 ; Bailey, Kerney L., 6-6-1-1 ; Baird, Bill, 19- 
13-4-1 : Baker, James A.. 0-1-0-0 : Baker, James E.. 40-30-7-5 ; 
Ball. Denver, 1-2-0-0: Ballard, Clark T., 6-8-4-1: Ballard, Jack 
H., 3-13-1-0 ; Ballinger, Richard L., 1-0-0-0 : Bandy, Jack, 5-4- 
4-2 : Bankemper, Jerome, 0-1-0-0 : Bankemper, Thomas F.. 
0-1-0-0 ; Barker. Donald, 3-39-5-4 ; Barker, Walter D., 0-2-0-0 ; 
Barlow, Billy B.. 0-1-0-0 : Barnes. Judson. 16-4-5-3 : Barnett, 
J. W.. 7-31-2-0: Barrett, Lloyd, 3-6-1-0; Barry, Harold L.. 
0-1-1-0; Bartley, Robert E.. 0-1-0-0: Barton. Walter, 0-16-2-1: 
Basham, James L., Jr., 0-4-0-4 : Basham, Willard, Jr., 0-1-2-0 ; 
Batten, Wade Howard, 0-2-0-0 ; Beard, Monie, 11-14-0-0 : Beeler, 
Arthur Louis, 0-1-2-0 : Begley, James P.. 1-3-1-0 : Bell, Clar- 
ence, 0-2-4-0: Bell, Thomas P.. 11-6-1-2: Bennett. Bert A., 
5-23-0-1 : Bennett, Gene, 0-:!-0-0 : Best, Gene, 1-14-2-1 : Betz, 
Dick. 31-25-2-4:; Black, Amos, 3-6-1-0 : Black, Charles D., 3-6-2-1 ; 
Black, Clarence, 16-18-6-2 : Blackburn, Clyde W.. 6-10-1-0 : Black- 
burn, Viley O.. 5-7-3-0 ; Blankenship, Zeb, 1-3-1-0 : Blanton, 
Homer, 14-12-6-1 : Blumer, Sherry. 0-7-1-0 : Boehm. Robert R.. 
0-2-0-0; Bolen. Edmon. 2-3-1-1: Bonner, William, 0-11-0-0: Bos- 
well, Albert R., 1-6-0-0 : Bowen, D. C. 0-0-1-1 : Bowling. Roy, 
1-13-0-1 : Bowman, Earl G. "Dick", 2-10-0-1 ; Boyles, Jerry F., 
1-3-3-0; Boyles, Paul, 3-4-0-0: Bradberry, Calvin, 3-3-0-1: Brad- 
shaw. Bill, 0-3-1-0 : Brady, James W.. 0-2-0-0 ; Branaman. Bill, 
Jr., 3-16-3-0: Brantley. Alfred C, 7-23-6-0; Braun, Robert M., 
2-20-1-0 : Bridges, Bennie E., 20-28-4-7 : Briscoe. Hubert, 0-2-0-0 ; 
Brizendine, Vic, 31-42-4-0 ; Broderick. Carroll A., 44-17-2-0 ; 
Brooks, James A., 3-6-2-0 : Brotzge, Maurice. 2-0-1-0 : Brown. 
Bryant. 3-15-7-3 ; Brown. Charles. 0-15-0-0 : Brown, James 
William, 27-22-3-3 ; Brown. J. Carlton. 3-32-2-1 : Browning. 
William Henry. 0-3-3-0 : Brugh. Walter J.. 5-10-3-0 : Brum- 
mett. Bill G.. 0-1-0-0; Brummett. Joseph W.. 3-22-1-0; Bryan. 
William B.. 2-10-4-0; Bryant. .Tack E., 0-7-2-1; Buchanan, 
Ned, O-l-O-l: Buis. Nathaniel. 3-9-6-0; Bunnell. Kenneth L., 
2-18-3-5: Burchett, Lanier S., 8-19-3-4; Burke, David L.. 0-1-0-0; 
Burnett. Gerald. 5-16-1-1 ; Burton. Dennis, 0-4-4-3 ; Butcher, 
Granville. 0-6-2-0 : Butcher. Joe M., 3-13-1-1 ; Butcher, Paul, 
2-4-1-0: Butler, Cortez, 0-2-0-1: Butler, Donald A.. 2-24-13-0; 
Butner. Billy, 5-10-6-1. 

Caldwell. James, 1-6-0-1 : Calhoun, Foster "Tubby", 4-7- 
1-0; Campbell, French. 4-1-0-0: Campbell. John E.. Jr.. 16-8- 
0-1 : Campbell. John D., 14-6-2-0 ; Campbell, William C, O-l- 
O-l ; Canter, John, 0-1-1-0 : Carlisle, John R.. 4-13-8-1 : Carp- 
enter. Bill, 14-35-8-3; Carpenter, Leonard F., 1-13-3-6; Cartee, 
Ralph, Jr., 0-1-0-0 ; Carter, James A.. 0-1-0-0 : Cartwright, 
.Tames F.. 7-14-7-0 ; Cassadv. Charles W.. 9-30-2-0 : Cassady. 
Richard. 11-14-6-6; Casteel. Ralph M., 5-11-2-0: Gates. Thomas 
Henry. 0-6-1-0 : Gates, Vernon R., 1-4-2-1 : Caudill, Gary A., 
2-1-1-1 : Chadwell, Lester. 0-0-1-0 ; Chafin. David Lee. 0-4-1-0 ; 
Chandler. James F.. 0-0-1-0 ; Chaney. Joseph G.. 7-16-5-0 ; 
Chaput, Louis E.. 0-0-1-2 ; Chattin, Charles, 14-13-1-0 : Chumb- 



ler, W. W., 4-13-6-2; Clark, Charles, 5-17-4-1: Clark, Owen B., 
0-0-1-0 ; Clark. Tom. 1-1-0-0 : Coe, James B.. 0-3-0-0 : Coffey, 
Kenneth B., 7-19-4-2: Coleman, .lim, 0-2-1-0: Coleman, L. J. 
"Duke", 14-18-3-4 : Collie, James E., Sr., 2-0-0-0 ; Collins, John 
J. "Jack", 4-1-0-1: Collins, Owen David, 0-4-1-1; Combs, 
Raymond, 3-9-5-0 : Combs, Roy B., 8-24-8-0 ; Combs, Travis, 
3-3-0-0: Combs, Walter H.. 11-11-0-0: Conley. George. 43-6-2-1; 
Conley, Ted Lynn. 0-1-0-0 ; Conley. Tom W., 0-0-2-0 ; Conn, 
Hershel, 4-3-2-0; Connor, James R.. 1-0-0-0: Connor, Neal R.. 
4-0-0-0 ; Cooper. John. 0-1-1-1 : Cooper, John Wellington, 7-8-1-1 ; 
Cooper, Warren. 33-2-0-0; Copley, Clyde, 0-1-1-0: Coppage, 
Donald, 3-9-4-1 ; Coppage, Eugene, 0-2-0-1 : Cornelius, Huel R., 
Jr., 0-1-1-2 ; Cornn, Harold, 10-5-7-0 : Cotton, Larry Joe, 
3-13-4-2 : Cox. Lavton. 9-22-2-2 : Cox, William J.. 8-13-12-.; 
Craft. James T.. 2-2-4-0 : Craft, William N., Jr.. 6-4-1-1 : 
Craig. John C. 1-4-2-0 : Craig, Randy, 2-1-1-0 : Crase. Darrell, 
0-3-0-1 ; Crawford, Fred T,, 7-21-6-3 : Creech, James Harvey, 
4-6-0-0; Crosthwaite, .Tohn S.. Jr.. 34-12-4-1; Crowe. Emmett 
H.. 0-2-0-1 ; Crowell, Jimmie R., 3-4-0-0 ; Crutcher, James W.. 
4-2-1-4: Cubbage. Thomas H.. 1-2-0-0; Cullivan, Jim, 6-4-1-0; 
Cummins, Albert B.. 5-4-5-5 ; Cummings, Dale A., 2-10-0-3 ; 
Cummins. Joshua W.. 0-1-1-1 : Curtis. James E., 2-7-1-3 ; Cur- 
tis, Robert L., 0-7-2-0. 

Damico. Ernie. 6-9-3-0 ; Davenport. Robert B.. 0-4-3-0 ; 
Davenport. William T.. 1-7-0-2 ; Davis. Donald. 15-22-0-0 ; 
Davis. Dwight R.. Jr., 6-22-3-0 : Davis, Kenny. 0-1-0-0 : Davis. 
Ralph E.. 36-5-4-0 : Davis, William, 5-7-0-0 : Decker, William 
K.. 3-8-1-1 : DeMoisey, Jean Fox, 25-32-4-1 ; Denney, Billy L.. 
4-5-1-0; Deskins. Tilden, 9-11-0-2: DeVary, W. B.. 1-3-1-1: 
Dixie. Cornelius. 1-1-2-0 : Di.xon, Sam. 0-1-0-0 : Dobson. Kenneth 
13-12-2-4 : Doehring, D. E. "Butch". 2-6-8-4 : Dorroh, Glenn 
U., Jr., 0-1-0-0 : Dotson, John B., 5-1-0-0 : Dotson, William S.. 
0-5-3-1; Downing. Dero, 17-5-1-0; Downing, Thomas E., 1-2- 
0-0 ; Doyle. Donald. 1-3-0-0 : Drake. Richard. 4-21-3-1 : Driskell. 
Earl, Jr.. 1-1-0-0 ; Duncan, Earl, 3-21-6-1 : Dunn, Sherley Ray, 
18-9-0-0 : Durkin, Jack H.. 32-36-3-2. 

Fades, Jimmy, 0-3-0-4 : Eads, Walter, 2-6-0-2 : Earle, G. 
Herschel, 1-3-0-1 ; Eaton, James Marvin, 0-11-8-3 ; Eddings, 
Forrest, 1-18-6-2 ; Edelen, Ben R., 21-32-1-2 : Edwards, Hubert, 
1-2-1-2 : Edwards, Llovd, 0-6-0-1 : Ellington, James E,, 5-23-3-1 : 
Elliott, Carroll Lee, 0-7-2-0; Ellspermann, George A.. 3-0-3-0; 
Elovitz. Carl. 1-7-1-0 ; Elrod, Turner, 22-41-4-0 : Estes, A. D., 
0-0-2-0 : Evans. James W., 0-7-0-0 ; Ewing, C. M. "Hop", 
4-23-3-5. 

Fagues, Homer. 9-5-3-2; Fallon. Robert J.. 2-4-2-0; Fannin. 
Benny. 0-3-0-0 : Fanning. Homer. 5-23-1-0 ; Farmer. John Clay 
"Jack". 0-8-6-0 : Felts. Charles A.. 0-5-4-2 : Ferrell. Doctor T.. 
20-16-4-2 : Fey. Allen. 1-8-2-1 : Fields. Joe D., 5-26-12-1 : Figg. 
Charles R.. 2-26-6-2 ; Finlelv. Sam. 0-1-0-0 ; Fitchko. Bill, 
44-5-2-1 : Flynn, Reynolds, 0-5-6-0 : Flynn. Robert D.. 31-28-2-0 ; 
Ford. Joe T., 7-6-0-0 ; Forrest. Billy, 1-14-3-2 : Forsythe, Robert, 
8-5-2-1: Foster, Berryan E.. 7-5-2-0; Foster. Joseph W., 1-2-1-0; 
Foster, William R. "Bob". 13-16-9-3: Fralev, Bill, 0-1-0-0; 
Franc, Anthony E.. 3-6-2-0 : Francis. Wendell Y.. 0-5-2-0 ; 
Franklin. James P.. 0-1-1-0 : Franklin. Robert. 6-6-2-0 : Frasure, 
Lois Eugene. 0-3-0-0; Fritz, Sherman. 19-43-3-2; Fryman, 
Bobby G., 0-3-0-0 ; Fugate. E. Hugh. 2-20-3-2 : Fuson. Shelvie, 
1-12-1-0. 

Gaither, Gene. 19-33-6-1 : Gaither, Jack. 20-33-6-1 ; Gamble. 
Gerald. 0-5-0-0: Gardner, H. Daniel. 13-11-6-0; Gardner. How- 
ard E.. 15-22-5-6; Garrett. Jack. 4-9-1-0; Gates. Thomas F.. 
0-1-1-0; Gates. William A., Jr.. 0-15-4-3; Gettler. John F.. 
3-16-1-2 ; Gibson. Romulus D.. 7-25-8-0 : Gilbert. Gerald 
LeRoy. 0-2-1-0 : Gilbert. Lawrence "Butch". 10-26-3-0 : Giles. 
Jonathan W., 1-2-1-1 : Gillesnie. Robert C.. 11-11-1-1 : Gish. 
Stanley David. Jr.. 0-1-0-0 : Godsev, Garland D.. 2-0-0-0 : Golden. 
Billy Joe, 26-14-6-1; Goodin. Charles, 1-12-2-0; Goodin, Shirley, 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1957 



Page Seven 



Kentucky High School Baseball Tournament 

StoU Field, Lexington, Kentucky 
June 5-6, 1957 



Newport (7) 



Russell Co. (9) 



Paintsville (1) 



Owensboro (3) 



Foi-t Knox (2) 



Lafayette (6) 



Russell Co. (0) 



Owensboro (9) 



Lafayette (2) 



duPont Manual (10) 



Murray (1) 



duPont Manual (3) 



Owensboro (3) 



duPont Manual (8) 



duPont Manual — Champion 



Hardi 
Charl 
Walla 



a-a-9-0; Goodwin. William H., 3-3-2-0: Goranflo, K. E., 8-26- 
6-3 ; Grace, Charles K., 6-7-4-0 : Grace, Hickory E., 0-6-6-1 ; 
Graham, .John, 1-0-0-0; Gray, Eaymond, 5-13-4-2; Green, Walter, 
35-8-4-7; Greenslait, James W., 0-2-2-0; Griese. Warren J., 
3-1-1-0 ; Griffin, William R., 2-5-3-0 ; Griffith. Daryel, 1-0-0-0 ; 
Grimes. James W., 0-19-2-0 ; Grisham, Jesse R.. 3-18-3-2 ; Grit- 
ton. Robert A., 2-5-0-0 ; Gustafson. Alford "Gus", Jr. 33-24-3-0. 

Hadden, Newell P., Jr., 26-36-3-4 ; Hagan. Joseph E. 19-30- 
8-1 ; Hagedorn, Thomas, 1-1-1-0 ; Hale, Don C, 18-20-1-2 ; 
Haley. Dalton D., 1-3-2-0 ; Hall, Billy Joe, 9-13-8-1 ; Hall, Bob, 
1-6-0-0 ; Hall, Elvis, 10-9-0-1 : Hammond, William, 0-1-2-0 ; 
Norman, 22-21-2-0 ; Hancock, Morris. W., 0-5-1-2 ; 
Ben. 0-2-0-1 ; Hardin, Jack H., 0-4-0-1 ; Harmon, 
W., 3-U-ll-O; Harned, Victor C. 1-1-2-1; Harp, Gene 
0-1-0-0 ; Harrell, Bill D.. 14-22-4-0 : Harris. Jerry 
Lee, 0-3-0-0 ; Hartley, William E., "Ox", 7-2-1-0 ; Hatfield, 
Gene, 0-1-0-0; Hatfield, Paul E., 0-1-0-0; Hayden, Samuel J.. 
0-1-0-0 ; Hayes, Charles R., 3-16-5-0 ; Hayes, Douglas J., 1-8-0-1 ; 
Haynes, John, 8-24-13-1 ; Head, Elmo C, 1-3-0-0 ; Heitzman, 
Don. 3-0-0-1; Heldman. John. Jr., 21-21-6-0; Henry, Maxwell 
"Red", 0-1-0-0 ; Herndon. Alton, 1-4-3-2 ; Hewling. Franklin C, 
3-7-4-1 ; Hewling, Richard. 4-23-2-3 ; Hibbs. Eugene M.. 0-4-0-0 ; 
Hill. Earl F., 0-2-2-0; Hill, Jimmie, 3-7-1-0; Hines. G. Cliff, 
21-50-3-0; Hinkle. Melvin B,. 0-0-0-1; Hiten, John W.. 1-6-0-0; 
Hobbs, Charles V., 1-5-1-0; Hobbs. Ralph E., 21-15-3-2; Hodge, 
Don Ilobert, 2-0-0-0 ; Hodge. Fred A.. 9-19-1-1 ; Hodges, Don, 
0-0-1-0 ; Hodges. Holbert, 4-2-0-0 : Hoferer, Louis R., 1-10-0-0 ; 
Hoffer, William E.. 0-8-1-1 ; Hofstetter, Joe. 7-5-0-3 ; Hogg, 
Bill. 3-18-9-7 ; Holbrook, Harold. 3-13-1-2 ; Holbrook, William 
M.. 0-1-0-2 ; Holeman, Bill R.. 0-6-5-0 ; Hollander. James A., 
0-1-0-0 ; Hollowell. James R., 0-1-0-0 ; Hoover, Ermon. Jr., 
0-1-0-0; Hornsby, John, 1-10-2-1: Horton, John B., 10-26-9-2: 
Houchin, Robert R.. 0-0-1-0: Houchin, William B.. 0-0-1-0; 
Howard. Carl, 40-23-4-2 : Howard. H. H., 4-2-4-2 : Howard, 
Jimmy D., 0-2-1-0; Howard, Joseph William, 2-3-1-0: Howard, 
Oscar D., 0-1-0-0; Hubbard, Joel M., 1-14-2-1; Hubbs, Cletus 
L.. Jr., 2-4-1-0 ; Hudson, J. D.. 2-0-0-0 ; Hudson. Oscar. 2-3-2-0 ; 
Hughes. Charles, 49-26-1-4 ; Hummer, Irby H., 3-20-5-2 ; Hun- 
ley, Neil P., 16-27-8-1: Hunt. Jackie L,. 3-2-4-0: Hunt. Leonard 
D., 4-13-0-1 : Huntsman, William L.. Jr., 0-2-0-2 ; Hurd, Fred, 
0-2-0-0; Hurst, David E., 8-6-4-1; Huter, James S., 11-11-1-0; 
Hutson, C. R., 1-2-0-1; Hutt, Joseph D., Jr., 14-33-13-2; Hyatt, 
Robert L., 8-1-2-1 : Hyland, Frank D., 1-0-0-0. 

Inman, Briscoe, 7-7-6-2 ; Irwin, Charlie. 4-8-0-0. 

James. Edward U., I-ll-l-l ; James, William V.. 0-1-1-0; 
Jenkins, James D., 17-43-9-1 : Jenkins, Joseph Kean, 25-27-7-1 : 
arl B., 3-0-1-0 : Jeter, John B., 4-10-1-1 ; Johnson, 
0-2-1-0 ; .Johnson. Glenn, 1-2-0-0 ; Johnson. Walter, 
26-33-3-3 : Johnson, William B., 1-5-10-1 ; Johnston, Edward E., 
10-20-4-0: Jones, Boyer, 10-21-6-0: Jones, Carson G., 1-27-6-2; 
Jones, Charles. Jr., 0-2-3-0 ; Jones, Donald. 0-5-4-0 ; Jones, 
George W.. Jr., 3-16-3-2 ; Jones, Jack S.. 0-2-2-2 ; Jordan. Ken, 
21-7-2-0 : Judy. Russell Max, 0-3-1-0 : Justice, Morris W., 0-0-0-1. 

Kazee. William Wallace, l-I-l-O : Keeton, Bill, 0-2-0-0; 
Kelly, Callis. 0-1-1-0: Kelley, Wiliam A., 0-11-3-0: Kereiakes, 
Spero, 2-19-3-0 ; Kessinger, Hubert B., 0-4-0-0 ; Key. Calvin E., 
6-.3-1-0 ; Kidd, William A., 1-2-0-0 : Kimmel. George H., Jr., 
2-9-3-6 : King, Allen, 1-6-3-1 : King, Bob, 10-31-5-2 : King, Dan, 
28-22-4-2; King, James A.. 9-29-2-0: King. James E.. 2-3-1-0; 
King. John J.. Jr., 5-4-4-0 ; King. P. J., 1-2-2-0 ; King, Ran- 
dall E., 2-23-3-3 ; King, Russell, 0-2-1-0 ; Kinman. Joe T., 
Leslie, 1-3-0-0 : Knight. Bill, 26-44-3-1 ; 
L., 2-0-0-0; Kok, George W.. 5-12-6-1; 
2-11-4-0. 

ance. Walter N., .Tr., 
Lashbrook, H. E., Jr., 



rger. 



3.5-37-6-0 : Kitchen, 
Kohlmeyer, Robert 
Kremer, Joseph A., 

Lambert, Kenneth L., 0-2-0-0 ; 
19-9-4-0 ; Larson, Robert A., 3-2-0-0 ; 



1-11-3-0; Lassiter, Riley, 6-20-2-3: Law, Ray Lewis, 1-0-0-0; 
Lawson, Leland, 1-5-2-0 ; Lazarus, Rhea Price. 5-15-1-0 : Leach. 
Aaron. 0-1-1-0: Leathers, Ollie C, 1-9-4-2; Ledford, James, Jr., 
1-2-0-0 ; Lequire, Harold Monroe, 2-4-2-2 ; LeVan, Thomas F., 
2-15-14-4; Lindloff, Gilbert E., 2-8-7-0; Linville, Shelby, 
0-1-0-0 ; Litteral. Ray, 0-1-4-0 ; Little, James Glenn, 0-4-3-0 ; 
Littral, /James W., 0-4-1-1 ; Logsdon, David L., 1-0-0-0 ; Long, 
Jamjs H.. 7-12-7-2 ; Long. William G.. Jr.. 10-21-6-0 ; Longe- 
necker, David M., 44-16-3-0 ; Looney, Dick. 20-15-1-1 : Lucas, 
Gene T., 31-22-2-3 ; Luckett, Gale, 2-5-3-1 ; Lusby, George, 
4-2-0-1 : Lykins, Clayton G., 2-9-4-0 ; Lyon, Manuel R., 3-1-0-1 ; 
Lyons. Harold M., 1-2-2-0; Lytle, William Price, 4-14-1-0. 

McBride, Donald, 0-1-0-0 ; McBride, W. Kenneth, 3-12-2-0 ; 
McClaskey, Booker, 6-10-1-3 ; McClellan, Leonard B.. 16-28-7-2 ; 
McCord, Anthony A., 1-4-2-1 ; McCord, Coleman, 4-4-1-0 ; Mc- 
Cowan, Connell, 3-6-4-0 ; McDowell, Glen D., 3-12-0-1 ; McGlasson, 
Galen, 2-6-1-0 ; McGuffey, Harold B., 2-1-0-0 ; McLeod, Robert 
N., Jr., 16-11-2-0; McNeil, Patrick, 4-16-8-2; McPike, Ray S.. 
Jr., 3-8-0-0. 

Mack, Harry L., 1-0-0-0 ; Macon, Alan Leon, 8-19-4-3 ; 
Macon. Max C 0-2-0-0; Mahan. Boyd W., 5-16-4-1; Mahan, 
Carle Erwin, 21-18-4-2 ; Maines, George E.. 6-26-6-2 ; Marble, 
Luther R.. 1-1-0-0; Martin, Howard I., 2-14-5-2: Martin, John 
B.. 0-0-1-1 ; Mason, .Fames E., 4-15-4-0 ; Massengill, Thomas, 
0-0-1-0: Matarazzo, Sal, 0-8-1-2: May. E. B.. Jr.. 9-11-2-2: 
May. M. Harold. 0-2-2-2 : Mayes, Edward. 0-7-2-0 ; Mayo. 
Henry L., Jr., 0-1-3-0 ; Mays, Ralph J.. 13-19-2-0 ; Mazza, 
Albert "Babe", 1-1-0-0 : Meade, Foster "Sid". 35-9-3-2 ; Meeks. 
Jack, 1-15-5-1; Melton, Curtis R.. 0-0-1-0; Menshouse. Glen, 
1-0-0-0 ; Merrick, Robert A., 0-0-0-1 ; Merritt, Bob. 2-1-0-0 ; Met- 
calf. Earl L.. 46-30-4-0 : Meyer. Harry J. "Bud", 0-1-0-0 ; Mil- 
ler, Bob, 19-15-1-0; Miller, Claude O.. 3-0-0-0; Miller, Dencel, 
1-13-1-0 ; Miller. Ferrell. 1-0-0-0 : Miller. Jack T. 
Miller, Roy Lee. 2-15-6-0 ; Mills. Herman 0-8-1-0 : Min 
0-1-1-0 ; Miracle, Ed, 17-5-2-3 : Molen, James P. 
Monahan. William G., 0-1-0-0 ; Monroe. Robert W., 
Moody, Adrian B., 0-1-1-0: Moore, Ed, 7-11-2-2: Moore, .lames 
E.. 4-11-2-0: Moore, Robert W., Jr.. 4-15-2-0; Moore, Roy. Jr.. 
1-1-6-0: Morgan, Charles A.. 0-4-2-3: Moricle. John. 1-1-0-0; 
Buddy. 0-1-0-0 ; Morris. Rodney A., 1-2-2-2 ; Morse. 
0-1-1-1 : Moser. Rudy. 0-6-0-0 : Moss, Bobby G., 
1-5-4-5; Mouser, H. D.. Jr., 18-23-14-4; Mudd, Ed L., 13-36-6-2; 
Mueller, Frank J., 0-1-0-1 ; MuUins. Arthur. 6-2-1-0 : MuUins, 
Bobby E.. 0-15-1-0; Mussman. Ralph. 38-31-5-1; Myers, Edward 
B.. 0-2-0-1. 

Nau. Bill. 12-14-1-1 ; Neal. Gene. 43-36-4-3 ; Neal, Marion. 
1-1-0-0 : Newcomb, Kenneth, 0-1-3-0 ; Newman, Bill, 0-2-1-0 ; 
Newman, Charles O., 0-0-0-1 ; Newman. E. B.. 5-0-0-0 : New- 
nam. Luther G.. 12-3-3-2: Newsom, Marley. 11-14-1-0; New- 
some. Forest. 13-9-1-1 : Newton, C. M., 24-16-5-1 ; Newton. 
Reason G., 7-8-5-1 ; Nie, Allen Frank, 0-6-0-0 : Nielsen, Stan- 
ley. 6-7-4-0 : Nimmo, Lo, 1-2-0-0 ; Nixon, James W.. 6-19-5-0 ; 
Noble, Charles, 13-28-3-5 : Noel. Paul. 15-9-1-0 ; Noel, Robert 
Alan, 0-2-0-0 ; Nord, Ed, 26-28-7-3. 

is M.. 0-5-0-0 : O'Daniel, Jeff, 0-0-2-0 ; 

, 0-5-2-0 : Oldham, John, 0-1-0-0 : Omer. 

O'Nan, Eugene. 6-23-4-0 : O'Nan. Norman. 

ill, 11-20-4-2: Osborne. Homer L.. 9-9-0-1; 
0-3-0-1 : Osborne, Nick. 3-0-1-1 ; Overly. 
1 ; Owen. Arthur P.. 2-0-0-0. 

9-28-5-1; Page. Forrest C, 6-19-0-0; Park. 
J. M.. 1-16-8-2 ; Parker, Billie E., 12-12-12-1 ; Parker, J. P., 
4-10-6-3 ; Parrott. Lannv L., 2-2-5-0 ; Partridge. Donald E.. 
0-2-0-0; Pate, Roy E., 1-0-0-0; Patrick. Charles C. 11-3-0-0; 
Patrick, Ralph, 6-11-2-3; Paulin, Al, 0-1-0-0; Peay, Curtis E., 



0-8-1-0 ; 

.r, Edgar, 

0-1-2-1 : 

1-17-1-1; 



Morr 



O'Cc 


nnell. 


Jar 


Oldham, 


Charles 1 


Billy W 


, 16-22 


K-3 


6-15-5-2 


Osbor 


le 


Osborne, 


Jame 


C 


William 


H.. 9-8 


-6-1 


Padgett, R. 


K. 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1957 



4-26-14-0; Pence. Clyde, 0-1-1-0; Penrod, Joe B., 10-8-6-0; 
Pergrem, Nard, 29-2ti-3-l ; Perry, James E., 0-0-0-1; Pewitt, 
Cnarles, 5-24-4-1 ; Phelps, John B., 1-3-1-1 ; Phelps, Ralph 
"Rudy", 18-29-3-0 ; Pierce, Ray O., 0-5-4-2 ; Pittard, Fred W., 
0-1-0-0 ; Poe, Thomas Ervin, 12-23-3-1 ; Polk, John C, 4-5-2-0 ; 
Poppas, Nickolas, 23-2b-2-l ; Porter, C. A., 29-35-4-2 ; Powell, 
Logan, 12-18-5-1 ; Powers, Hazel Allen, 0-0-1-0 ; Preece, Boyce 
C, 0-3-0-U; Price, James E., 0-13-13-1; Price, Jimmy, 0-3-2-1; 
Pruden, Jim, 0-0-5-2; Pursifull, Cleophus, 22-18-6-4; Pursiful, 
Darrell. 1-2-0-0. 

Quinn, William J., 1-0-2-0. 

Radjunas. Stan E., 2-0-0-0; Rainey, Jimmy, 2-2-2-0; Raitt, 
William C, 0-1-0-0 ; Kail, Eugene, 3-26-0-1 ; Randall, H. C, 
0-8-3-2 ; Randolph, Donald M., 3-12-2-0 ; Rapier, Burl, 0-1-0-1 ; 
Ratlerman, Bernard W., Sr., 7-14-4-0 ; Hay, Robert R., 2-8-2-4 ; 
Ray, Shiriey G., 0-0-2-1 ; Redman, Malvern G., 3-4-2-0 ; Reed, 
Charles R., 18-10-1-0 ; Reed, Gordon, 14-18-8-1 ; Reeves, Ken- 
neth, 9-28-3-0; Reinhardt, Myron S., 2-22-4-1; Renfro, John 
Edwin, 6-4-3-0 ; Rentz, Thomas W., 21-11-0-2 : Reynolds, Rich- 



0-1-0-0; Reynold; 
10-17-5-2; Richards, Jin 
11-27-7-4 ; Richardson 
7-7-0-0 ; Ricketts, Ch 
1-6-5-0; Ring, Will 



7-13-3-0; Rice, Homer, 

6-10-2-1 ; Richardson, Joe M. 

Lewis H., 1-4-1-4 ; Richeson, King 

de 0., 7-21-3-0; Riggs, William T. 

H.. 0-4-2-0 ; Rison, Johnny B., 0-1-0-0 



Hitter. Goebel, 17-5-0-1 ; Roberts, Clayton C, 1-8-1-1 ; Rob. 
Earl C, 12-17-8-3 ; Robertson, William R., 2-2-1-0 ; Hob" 
Donald C, 0-5-4-1 ; Rocke, James M., 21-7-1-0 ; Rodgers, David 
G., 1-5-2-1 ; Roll, Tom, 0-2-0-2 : Roller, Otis C, 7-16-14-2 
Rolph, Harold J., 3-1-0-0; Rose, Harold S., 4-3-0-0; Rose, Lee 
H., 1-0-1-0 ; Rose. Wallace C. 17-18-2-0 ; Rosenbaum, Robert 
L., 9-12-6-1 ; Ross, Billy E., 0-3-0-1 ; Rothfuss, Richard, 3-14-6-1 ; 
Rountree, John T., 6-12-1-0 ; Rouse, Clyde L.. 11-22-8-2 ; 
Rozen, Morris, 3-19-4-0 ; Rubarts. Leland C. 2-14-2-0 ; Rush. 
Ralph. 0-0-1-0 : Russell, Allen W.. 30-37-5-2 ; Russell. Eugene 
■■Eudy". 2-2-U-O; Russell, Joe. 18-26-5-3. 

St. Clair. Robert L., Jr., 0-8-1-1 ; Salchli, Stanley W., 
0-1-0-0; Salisbury, William J., 0-1-0-0; Sallee. Charles. C-l-O-O ; 
Salyer, Paul H., 1-4-2-0; Samples, Gilbert, 5-16-3-0; Sanders, 
Mel. 29-31-3-0; Sang, Bob. 8-21-2-1 : Saylor. Deward. 5-5-2-0; 
Scharfenberger. Irv. 0-5-0-0 : Schellhase. David. 3-3-0-0 ; Schlich. 
Paul, 7-18-4-3 : Schmalfuss, Werner, 0-1-0-0 ; Schnebelt, Carl 
R., 0-5-0-0; Schu, Wilbur. 9-14-0-1; Schwitz, Joe, 3-4-1-0; Scott, 
Bill. 0-2-0-0 ; Scott. Emmanuel, 1-5-4-1 : Seidel. Herb. 1-1-0-1 ; 
Selvy, Curt. 0-10-0-1; Settle. Evan, 0-2-0-0; Settle, Roy G., 
46-16-1-1 ; Sexton, Wiliam L., 0-10-4-1 ; Sharp, Claude, 0-6-3-1 ; 
Shaw, Don, 0-1-0-0 : Shaw. Stanley E.. 0-3-2-0 ; Shelton, Robei-i, 
.0-16-2-0; Shively, Howard. Jr., 0-2-1-0; Shope. Lowell M.. 
1-0-0-0 ; Showalter. John. 15-10-3-1 : Shrewsbury. Richard P.. 
.0-8-6-1: Shuck, Steve. 1-5-5-1; Shuck, Thomas G.. 7-15-6-2; 
Siler. Clarence M.. 3-14-6-0 ; Simpson, Jack. 0-4-3-0 : Sloan. 
.Wallace, 6-20-5-1; Small, Rex. 0-1-1-0; Small. William W., Jr.. 
8-19-6-2 ; Smith, Charles Donald. 0-6-2-1 ; Smith. David W.. 
2-13-3-1 ; Smith. Edgar J.. 6-26-8-3 ; Smith. Edwin B.. 0-6-2-0 ; 
Smith. Elza. 0-6-2-0 : Smith. Eurie H.. 4-8-0-2 ; Smith. Eurie 
Hayes. HI, 0-;)-0-0 ; Smith, John K., 3-9-2-3 : Smith. Wayne 
N.. 0-1-1-0 ; Smith, Wilbur G., 9-9-2-0 ; Smith, Wilbur W., 
8-20-5-1 ; Smith, Willard N.. 0-1-2-0 : Snetz. .Tames Morris, 
0-0-1-0 ; Snider. Louis G., 1-8-7-0 ; Solomon, Jim. 7-10-4-0 ; 
Sosh, LaRue. 27-8-0-1 ; Sosh, Nelson. 21-10-3-0 ; South. Wil- 



liam F.. 3-24-7-10 ; Spaulding, Stanley H., 4-3-1-1 ; Spencer, 
Edward. 0-9-3-0; Spencer, Irvin E., 3-5-2-1; Spiceland, S. E., 
2-14-10-6 ; Stamper, Paul, 0-7-0-0 ; Stamper. Robert L.. 11-11-2-1 ; 
Stanfill, Robert. 2-17-4-8 ; Stanley. Haskell, 0-4-6-2 ; Steely. 
Stanley B., 1-8-1-0 ; Steenken. William R.. 5-19-4-1 ; Stephens, 
Grover O.. 1-1-1-1 ; Stephenson, Harry S., 15-7-1-1 ; Stewart, 
Charles W., 0-4-0-0 ; Stewart. Herbert T., 6-4-1-1 ; Stidham, 
Thomas E., 0-8-6-0; Stinson. John M., 0-0-0-3; Stone. Clifton, 
2-1-0-0; Straight. Roy. 0-1-0-0; Strange, William L., 10-14-5-0; 
Strong, Arnett. 25-7-1-0 ; Strong. David A.. 2-15-5-0 ; Sturgill, 
Barkley. 1-5-4-1 ; Stutler, John P., 3-7-1-0 ; Sullivan. Dan L., 
0-3-0-2 ; Sullivan. Don C. 2-12-3-0 ; Surface, William E.. 2-1- 
0-0 ; Swope. William W.. 0-2-1-0. 

Taylor. Carl. 2-0-0-0 : Taylor Carl L., 3-6-4-3 ; Taylor. Dennis. 
3-10-7-10 ; Taylor, Edwin L. "Ed", 19-22-1-4 ; Taylor, Hall, 
7-24-1-0 ; Taylor. Robert S.. 6-28-10-2 : Teague. Amos, 38-40-5-1 ; 
Teer, P'orrest D.. 0-2-0-0; Thoma. M. L., 14-34-2-2; Thomas. 
Bill L., 0-0-0-1 ; Thomas, William G., 0-0-1-2 ; Thompson, Jack. 
62-32-6-2 : Thompson. Ralph. 1-8-0-0 ; Thurman. A. Earl, 1-15- 
1-0 ; Thurman, Harold W.. 0-0-1-0 ; Thurman, Robert. 3-19-3-2 ; 
Tichenor. Billy. 1-8-5-3; Tilley. H. M., 11-16-3-0; Tincher, 
Robert, 9-16-7-1 ; Tipton. Asa I.. 9-36-5-2 : Todd, Lonnie, 0-1-2-4 ; 
Tolbert, John L.. 0-3-0-0 ; Telle. Charles W.. 0-1-0-0 ; Topmiller, 
Ben. Jr., 2-7-3-2 ; Toy. Eddie N.. 0-3-0-1 ; Trivette, John W.. 
7-3-0-0; Troutman. Doyle C. 14-14-4-1; Tuck. Ochell, 2-11-1-0; 
Tucker, Morris E.. 0-1-0-0 ; Turner. A. J.. 16-10-6-2 ; Turner, 



Aaron P.. 0-5-1-1. 

Ulsas, Charle: 
Richard. 0-7-2-0. 

Vance. Earl ' 
Vandergripp. Ger 
VanSant. William 
William, 23-29-13-3 : V 
4-11-1-0 ; Vice. Cliff, J 
Wade. Bill. 2-15-4-0 
R.. 3-13-0-0 ; Walker, Paul R., 
0-5-3-3 ; Wallin. Buddy Malcol 



1-0-0-0 ; Upton, Leon, 0-5-0-1 ; Urlage, 



7-10-8-1 ; 
4-5-10-4 ; 
., 1-4-0-0 ; 



Vandenberg, Ralph H.. 
VanMeter. Kaye Don, 
VanZant. Jim. 7-11-0-0 ; 



1-4-1-0; 
3-2-1-0 ; 
Varble. 



Ray G.. 3-18-2-2 ; Vaughn. Melvin, 

1-1-0-0 ; Vineyard. Chalmer E.. 0-1-5-0. 

Waldon. Tot. 27-22-0-1 ; Walke. Glenn 

3-12-0-0 : Waller. Charles L.. 

. 0-2-1-0 ; Walter. Lafayette. 



1-6-6-1; Wanchic. Nicholas. 1-2-0-0; Ward, Bobby G.. 0-4-0-0; 
Ward. Tommy. 16-19-7-0 ; Warner. Marvin. 5-12-8-1 ; Webb. 
Oren H.. 4-11-2-2: Webb. Walter E., 0-3-0-1; Weber. John. 
2-0-0-0 : Weisbrodt. Paul E.. 24-23-6-4 : Welch. Ralph W. 
6-12-7-4 ; Welch. Tom. 0-1-0-0 ; Wells. Milford. 35-23-6-4 ; 
Westerfield. Glenn. 6-19-2-1 ; Whalen. William C. 0-12-1-0 ; 
Whedbee. Mel. 2-4-3-1 ; Whipple, Lloyd G.. 4-3-0-0 : White. 
David B.. 0-13-5-4 : White. James. 0-1-0-0 : White, Jan.es D., 
1-0-0-0 ; Wilder. Murris E.. 3-1-0-0 : Willett, Arthur G., 2-9-2-0 ; 
Williams, Bobbie, 3-13-4-1 ; Williams, Donald D.. 1-2-0-0 ; Wil- 
liams James H.. 5-6-5-0 : Williams. Lewis P.. 0-2-0-1 : Williams. 
Roger, 14-24-;5-l : Willis, Robert A.. 0-7-0-1 : Wilson. Burnell 
Zeke. 2-8-2-0 : Wilson. Jack R., 28-21-7-1 : Winchester, Roy 
L.. 26-213-3-0 : Winfrey, Shelby, 39-33-9-3 : Wing. Howard R.. 
Jr., 0-2-1-0: Wise. Billy V.. 0-3-1-1: Wise. Jack, 14-20-2-0; 
Withrow. Roy D.. 3-4-2-0 ; Witschger. LeRoy J.. 0-2-1-2 : Witt. 
Fred, 0-2-1-1 : Woford, Ernest. 5-13-1-0 : Womack, William H., 
0-11-4-0; Wood. James W., 3-1-0-0; Wortham, Robert W.. 
0-2-1-0 : Wray. Barrel. 1-5-3-3 : Wright. Ben, 0-1-0-0 ; Wright, 
Billy Toe. 8-11-4-1 : Wright. Paul. 6-6-3-3 : Wurtz. Emil H.. 
2-8-1-0. 

Yates. William D.. 5-12-5-3; Yeary. William H.. Jr., 1-4- 
3-0 ; Yessin, Humzey, 26-27-6-2 ; Yojng, Coleman L.. 6-13-2-0. 



Officials' Ratings on Sportsmanship of K. H. S. A. A 

Member Schools in Basketball, 1956-1957 



Adair County (Columbia) 

Adaivville 

Ahrens Trade (Louisville) 

Albany Ind. -Clinton Co. (Albany). 

Allen County (Scottsvllle) 

Aln 



Alvaton 

Anderson ( Lawrenceburg ) _ 
Annville Inst 

Arlington 

Ashland 

Athens (Lexington) 

Atherton (Louisville) 

Auburn 

Augusta 

Austin Tracy (Lucas) 



Bald Knob (Frankfort) 

Ballard Memorial (Barlow) - 

Baibourville 

Bardstown 

Bard well 

Bate (Danville) 



Da 



12 


1 


10 


2 


9 


3 


5 


5 1 


5 




5 


2 


6 




4 




6 




11 




4 




6 




8 




2 




12 




6 




2 




18 




12 




6 




3 




15 




5 




10 


5 


6 


3 


10 


2 


9 





OTHER 

SCHOOL 

OFFICIALS 



52 


6 




33 


4 




38 


5 


1 


41 


4 


1 


38 


7 




34 


6 




39 


7 




32 


1 


1 


28 


5 




43 


7 


1 


44 


5 




44 


5 


1 


47 


8 


1 


32 


2 




37 


6 




27 


5 


3 


32 






37 


15 


1 


xr, 


11 




36 


4 




37 


1 


2 


36 


12 




37 


6 


1 


16 


8 


5 


65 


6 




24 


7 


1 


25 


7 





43 


14 




24 


9 


4 


28 


14 


3 


34 


6 


3 


36 
32 


8 
8 


1 


30 


13 


3 


27 


4 


2 


:.6 


7 




37 


12 


3 


32 


7 


8 


37 


13 




39 


17 




31 


3 




24 


18 


2 


2(1 


5 


1 


26 


5 




30 


20 


5 


26 


20 




28 


4 


4 


27 


6 


6 


31 


15 


3 


32 


9 


2 


7 


18 


2 


56 


13 


3 


21 


11 


1 


19 


12 


2 1 



47 


9 


2 


25 


10 


3 


33 


10 


3 


32 


6 


5 


40 


5 




24 


14 


2 


29 


15 


2 


31 


2 


2 


24 


6 


3 


38 


14 




38 


6 


3 


43 


6 


2 


46 


8 


1 


29 


5 




28 


16 




26 


6 


3 


28 


3 


1 


33 


17 


5 


2S 


17 




31 


6 


2 


37 


3 


1 


31 


18 


1 


35 


8 




14 


12 


1 


58 


14 




21 


11 




21 


12 


1 1 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1957 



Page Nine 



OTHER 

SCHOOL 

OFFICIALS 



Bell (Pineville) 

Jiellevue 

iienham 

iJenton 

Uerea 

Uerea tounuai-on— 

iJetsy Layne 

lliacK iiLar lAivaj _ 



iJioomiiejU 

U. X. Wasiunguon (Asmanaj 

Boone (Jounty (.i- lorencej 

BourDon uounty ii'ansj 

Bowiing (jreen 

lioyd County (.Asmandj 

Bracken (Jounty (lirooKsviliej 

Breacnitt (.JacKsonj 

Breckinridge Co. ^^ila^dlnsou^gJ 

ttreckinridge irng. (.M.oreneadj — 

Bremen 

Bridgeport ^r ranKiortj 

Bristow 

Brodhead 

Brownsville 

Buckeye (Liancasterj 

Buckhorn 

Buffalo 

Burgin 

Burnside 

Bush ^Lida' 

Butler 

Butler (Shively) 

Butler County (Morgantownj 

Caldwell County (Princeton ) 

Calhoun 

Camargo (i>it. fciterling) 

Campbell County ( Alexandria) 

Campbellsburg 

Campbelisvilie 

Camp Dick Kobinson (Lancaster)- 

Caneyville 

Carlisle 

Carr Creek 

Carrollton 

Carter 

Catlettsburg 

Caverna (Horse Cave) 

Cayce 

Centertown 

Central (Clinton) 

Central (Louisville) 

Central City 

Chandlers Chapel (Auburn) 

Charleston (Dawson Springs) 

Clark County (Winchester) 

Clarkson 

Clay 

Clay County (Manchester) 

Clifty 

College (Bowling Green) 

Corbin 

Cordia 

Covington Catholic 

Crab Orchard 

Crittenden Co. (Marion) 

Crofton 

Cuba (Mayfield) 

Cub Run 

Cumberland 

Cumberland County (Burkesville) _ 

Cunningham 

Cynthiana 

Dalton 

Danville 

Daviess County (Owensboro) 

Dawson Springs 

Dayton 

Deming (Mt. Olivet) 

Dilce Combs Mem. (Jeff) 

Dixie Heights (Covington) 

Dixon 

Dorton 

Douglass ( Lexington) 

Drakesboro 

Dubois (Mt. Sterling) 

Dunbar ( Mayfield) 

duPont Manual ( Louisville) 

Earlington 

Eastern (Middletown) 

Edmonton 

Elizabethtown 

Elizabethtown Catholic 

Elkhorn (Frankfort) 

Elkhorn City 

Eminence 



Pag-e Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1957 



OTHER 

SCHOOL 

OFFICIALS 



Erie (.Olive Hill) 

ii^stiU County (irvinej 

iijubank 

Kvarts 

hlzei 

t'airview (Asnland) 

l-'ulniouih 

Farmingcon 

Feds Creek 

Ferguson 

Fern Creek 

Ji'laget (Louisville J 

Flanerty ( Vine (jrovej 

Flat Cap 

Fleming County (FlemingsburgJ 

Fleming-Neon (Neonj 

Forasviile 

Forklani (.Gravel Switch) 

Fort Knox 

Frankfort 

Franklin-Simpson (.ii-'ranKun ) 

Frederick I'raize (Cioverporc) — 

Fredericktown (Springfield) 

Fredonia 

Frenchburg 

Fulgham (Clinton) 

Fulton 

Gallatin County (Warsaw) 

Gamaliel 

Garrett 

Garth (Georgetown) 

Glasgow 

Glendale 

Good Shepherd (Frankfort) 

Graham 

Grant County (Dry Kidgej 

Gretnsburg 

Greenup 

Greenville 

Guthrie 

Haldeman 

Hall (Grays Knob) 

Hanson 

Harlan 

Harrison County (Cynthiana) — 

Harrodsburg 

Hartford 

Hawesville 

Hazard 

Hazel 

Hazel Green Academy 

Hazel Green (East Bernstadt)__ 

Heath (W. Paducah) 

Hellier 

Henderson 

Henderson County 

Henderson Settle. (Frakes) 

Henry Central (New Castle) 

Henry Clay (Lexington) 

Hickman 

Highlands (Ft. Thomas) 

Hindman 

HiseviUe 

Hitchins 

Hodgenville 

Holmes (Covington) 

Holy Cross (Covington) 

Holy Family (Ashland) 

Holy Name (Henderson) 

Hopkinsville 

Horse Branch 

Howevalley (Cecilia) 

Hughes-Kirk (Beechmont) 

Hustonville 

Inez 

Irvine 

Irvington 

•Tackson 

Johns Creek (Pikeville) 

Junction City 

Kingdom Come (Linefork) 

Kirksey 

Knott County (Pippa Passes) 

Knox Central (BarbourvilIe)___ 

Kyrock (Sweeden) 

Lacy (Hopkinsville) ' 

Lafayette (Lexington) 

Lancaster 

Leather wood (Slemp) 

Lebanon 

Lebanon Junction 

Lee County (Beattyville) 

Leitchfield 

Leslie County (Hyden) 



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2 


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1 




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3 


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12 






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3 


2 1 



THE KEiNTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1957 



Page Eleven 



OTHER 

SCHOOL 

OFFICIALS 



Letcher 

J-iewisbui'g 

Lewisport 

i-i^xington CatnoliC- 

Liberty 

Liiy^ 



Lincoln Inst. (Lincoln Kidge) _. 

Livermore 

Livingston 

Livingston County (timithlandj _ 

Lloyd, Memorial (Erianger; 

London 

Lone Jack (tour MileJ 

Lone Oak (J^aducanj 

Louisa 

Louisville Catholic 

Lowes 

Loyall 

X.udiow 

Lyn 



Lynn Camp (CorDinJ 

Lynn Grove 

Lynnvale (.White Mills) 

Lyon County (Kuttaw^aj 

McCreary Couniy { Wnitley City) 

McUoweii 

McKee 

McKeU (South Shore) 

McKinney 

Mackville 

Madtson Central (Kichmond) 

Madison-Model (Richmond) 

Madison ville 

Magnolia 

Magoffin Bapt. Ins. (Mountain Valley) 

Male (Louisville) 

Marion 



Marrowbone 

Martin 

Mayfield 

Mayslick 

Maysville 

Maytow.n (Langley ) 

M. C. Napier (Darfork) 

Meade County (Brandenburg) 

Meade Memorial (WilUamsport)— . 

Memorial (Hardyville) 

Memorial (Waynesburg) 

Mercer (Harrodsburg) 

Middleburg 

Middlesboro 

Midway 

Milburn 

Millersburg Mili. Inst 

Minerva 

Montgomery County (Mt. Sterling). 

Monticello 

Morehead 

Morgan 

Morgan County (West Liberty) 

Morganfield 

Mt. Sterling 

Mt. Vernon 

Mt. Washington 

Muhlenberg Central (Powderly) 

Mullins (PikeviUe) 

Munfordville 

Murray 

Murray Training 

Nancy 

Nebo 

New Concord 

Newport 

Newport Catholic 

Nicholas County (Carlisle) 

Nicholasville 

North Marshall (Calvert City) 

North Middletown 

North Warren (Smiths Grove) 

Oil Springs 

Oldham County (LaGrange) 

Old Kentucky Home (Bardstown) — 

Olive Hill 

Olmstead 

Oneida Inst 

Orangeburg (Maysville) 

Ormsby Village ( Anchorage) 

Owen County (Owenton) 

Owensboro 

Owensboro Catholic 

Owensboro Technical 

Owingsville 

Owsley County (Booneville) 

Paducah Tilghman 

Paint Lick 



2 

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26 I 
39 I 
51 I 
41 I 
14 I 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1957 



OTHER 

SCHOOL 

OFFICIALS 



Paints ville 

Pans 

Park City 

Parksville 

P. L. Dunbar (Lexington). 

Peaks Mill (l^'rankfort) 

Pembroke 

Perryviile 

Phelps 

Pikeville 



Pin 



Kn 



Pineville 

Pleasant View 

Pieasureville 

Poplar Creek (Carpenter) 

Powell County (Stanton) 

Prestonsburg 

Prichard ( (jrayson) 

Providence 

Pulaski County (Somerset) 

Raceland 

Red Bird (Beverly) 

Reidland (PaducahJ 

Richards ville 

Riney ville 

Riverside Chr. Trng. (Lost Creek) _ 

Rockhold 

Russell 

Russell County (Russell Springs) 

Russellville 

Sacramento 

St. Agatha (Winchester) 

St. Agnes (Uniontown) 

St. Augustine ( Lebanon) 

St. Catherine (New Haven) 

St. Charles (Lebanon) 

St. Francis (Loretto) 

St. Henry (Erlanger) 

St. Jerome (Fancy Farm) 

St. Joseph Prep. (Bardstown) 

St. Mary (Alexandria) 

St. Mary's (Paducah) 

St. Patrick's (Maysville) 

St. Thomas (Ft. Thomas) 

St. Vincent 

St. Xavier (Louisville) 

Salem 

Salyersville 

Sandy Hook 

Scott County (Georgetown) 

Scottsville 

Sebree 

Sedalia 

Sharpsburg 

Shawnee (Louisville) 

Shelbyville 

Shepherds ville 

Shopville 

Silver Grove 

Simon Kenton (Independence) 

Simpsonville 

Sinking Fork (Hopkinsville) 

Slaughters 

Somerset 

Sonora 

South Christian (Herndon) 

Southern (Louisville) 

South Hopkins (Nortonville) 

South Marshall (Benton) 

South Portsmouth 

Springfield 

Stanford 

Stearns 

Stinnett Settlement (Hoskinston) — 

Sturgis 

Sunfish 

Symsonia 

Taylor County (Campbellsville) 

Taylorsville 

Temple Hill (Glasgow) 

Todd County (Elkton) 

Tollesboro 

Tompkinsville 

Trenton 

Trigg County (Cadiz) 

Trimble County (Bedford) 

Trinity (Louisville) 

Tyner .__ 

Uniontown 

University (Lexington) 

Utica 

Valley (Valley Station) 

Vanceburg-Lewis Co. ( Vanceburg)__ 

Van Lear 

Versailles 



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THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1957 



Page Thirteen 



Vine Grove 

Virgie 

Waddy 

Wallins (Wallins Creek) 

Walton- Verona (Walton) 

Warfield 

Warren County (Bowling Green). 

Wayland 

Wayne County (Monticello) 

Western (Sinai) 

West Point 

Wheelwright 

Whitesburg 

William Grant (Covington) 

Williamsburg 

Williamstown 

Wiliisburg 

Wilmore 

Winchester 

Wingo 

Wolfe County (Campton) 

Woodbine 

Wurtland 











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OFFICIALS 




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REPORT OF INSURANCE CLAIMS 



Three hundred schools insured their athletes l 
insured, in all sports except football 6356, and 
with 931 totaling $20,238.15 being paid. 



ier the K. H. S. A. A. Protection Fund in 1956-57. In football 3718 boys were 
physical education 95. Nine hundred seventy-four claims were submitted. 



School Claimant Injury 

Anderson Bobby Black Broken nose 

Anderson Jimmy P'arris X-ray (leg) 

Anderson Harry Searcy Broken nose 

Annville Earl Gene Smith X-ray (anklel 

Annville Jimmy Hacker X-ray (ankle) 

Ashlaind Ronnie Perry X-ray (elbow) 

Ashlalnd Talmadge Everman X-ray (kneel 

Ashlaind James Mason X-ray (ankle) 

Ashlalnd Bill Pendleton X-ray (knee) 

Ashlaind Gary McPeek X-ray (chest) 

Ashlalnd Allen Klaiber X-ray (pelvis) 

Ashlalnd Talmadge Evei-man Broken tooth 

Athens Pete Roy Dailey Fractured radius and ulna 

Athens Claude Rhorer, Jr. Dislocated ankle, X-ray 

Atherton Allan Ritchie Hand injury (special) 

Atherton David Burhans X-ray (elbow) 

Atherton Jack Crutcher X-ray (knee) 

Atherton Walter Bales Knee injury (special) 

Atherton John Graves Dental injury (special) 

Atherton David Burhans Head injury (special) 

Atherton Jim Eisenmanger Laceration — suture 

Atherton John Perry, Jr. Laceration — suture (two claims)- 

Atherton Dean Elkins X-ray (ankle) 

Atherton John Inman X-ray (elbow) 

Atherton Dean Elkins Replaced knocked out filling 

Atherton Robert Rapp X-ray (tooth) 

Auburn Robert Earl Chyle Back injury (special) 

Auburn Buddy Barry Dislocated shoulder 

Augusta .John Marshall X-ray (ankle) 

Austin Tracy Carroll Wyatt Fractured clavicle 

Bald Knob Bobby Lee X-ray (anklel 

Bald Knob Clay Hamons X-ray (chest) 

Bald Knob Nelson Moore X-ray (spine) 

Ballard Memorial Glen Adams X-ray (elbow) 

Barbourville Raymond Leger Laceration — suture 

Barbourville Ray Blair Canady X-ray (arm) 

Barbourville James G. Mitchell X-ray (knee) 

Bardstown Johnny Bowman Tendon — separation from bone 

Bardstown Cecil Robinson Dislocated shoulder 

Bardstown Scotty Miller Fractured metacarpal 

Bardstown Davis Graham X-ray (leg) 

Bardstown Bobby Brooks X-ray (chest) 

Bardstown Owen Brown X-ray (finger) 

Bardstown Scotty Colvin X-ray (chest) 

Beechwood Don Mescher Laceration — suture 

Beechwood Mike Oien Laceration — suture 

Beechwood Autrey Parker X-ray (chest) 

Bell County .Terry Howard Loss of teeth 

Benham Donald Hodges Broken tooth. X-ray 

Benham .Jimmy Cornett X-ray (hand) 

Benham George Phillip Nunnery X-ray (hand) 

Benham George Phillip Nunnery X-ray (kneel 

Benham Jerry James X-ray (ankle) 



t Paid 

$ 5.00 

8.00 

11.00 

6.00 

6.00 

12.00 

12.00 

10.00 

12.00 

15.00 

10.00 

8.00 

75.00 

31.00 

24.00 

12.00 

10.00 

150.00 

64.00 

52.20 

5.00 

10.00 

6.00 

6.00 

6.00 

2.00 

40.50 

35.00 

6.00 

35.00 

7.50 

10.00 

10.00 

12.00 

5.00 

6.00 

8.00 

36.00 

35.00 

12.60 

7.50 

10.00 

7.50 

7.50 

6.00 

7.50 

6.00 

50.00 

30.00 

5.00 

6.00 

6.00 

6.00 



Page Fourteen THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1957 

Benham Ray Simpson X-ray (shoulder) 8.00 

Berea Carl Hammond Fractured radius & ulna 25.00 

Berea Oai-1 Hammond Fractured radius & ulna (additional payment) 13.00 

Berea Boyd Williams Ankle injury (special) 160.00 

Berea Phil Ed Hammond X-ray (loot) 12.00 

Berea Foundation Charlels Fiske Fractured metacarpal. X-ray 32.00 

Black Star Orville Saylor Loss of tooth 25.00 

Black Star Tommy Roaden X-ray (knee) 7.50 

Black Star Clark Mayfield X-ray (shoulder) 7.50 

Black Star Clayton Hall X-ray (knee) 7.50 

Black Star Orville Saylor X-ray (spine) 15.00 

Bowling Green Bobby Cassidy Dislocated finger, X-ray 16.00 

Bowling Green Raymond Hunt, Jr. Fractured fibula 50.00 

Bowling Green Joe Mayes Fractured radius & ulna 55.10 

Bowling Green Hal Kitchens Leg injury (special) 29.08 

Bowling Green Larry Abbott Tendon — separation from bone 6.U0 

Bowling Green Jerry Stahl Fractured finger. X-ray 20.00 

Bowling Green rial Reynolds X-ray (chest) 10.00 

Bowling Green Cordell Belk Ankle injury (special) 36.53 

Bowling Green Dale Lindsey Fractured metatarsal. X-ray 35.00 

Bowling Green Jack Duncan Dental injury (special) 60.00 

Bowling Green Billy Stout Fractured humerus 50.00 

Bowling Green Bobby Cassidy Fractured metatarsal. X-ray 37.00 

Bowling Green Robert Henon X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Bowling Green Billy Stout X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Bowling Green Jim Sparks Broken nose. X-ray 30.00 

Bowling Green Richard Carter Dental injury (special) 27,00 

Bowling Green Bob Henon X-ray (knee) 10.00 

Bowling Green Bobby Cassidy Broken teeth 50.00 

Bowling Green Paul S. Day Dental injury (special) 25.00 

Bowling Green Peter Hackney X-ray (nose) 15.00 

Boyd County Gary Edmond X-ray (spine) 10.00 

Breathitt Kern Carpenter Broken tooth 12.00 

Breckinridge County Charles Robinson X-ray (pelvis & chest) ^ 20.00 

Brodhead Darrell Stevens Fractured tibia 30.50 

Brodhead Ronald Laswell Fractured metatarsal, X-ray 27.00 

Brownsville Dorothy Beckner X-ray (ankle) 8.00 

Brownsville Kenneth Wingfield X-ray (anklel) 9.00 

Buckeye Merle Tyree Laceration — suture 5.00 

Buckeye Shelby Stone Laceration — suture 5.00 

Buckeye Luther Howard X-ray (head) 10.00 

Buffalo Leonard Ackerman X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Burgin Bob Krahulek X-ray (chest) 10.00 

Burgin Charles Goodlett X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Burgin Joe Hayslett Finger injury (special) 27.00 

Bush Joe McKnight X-ray (foot) 10.00 

Bush Russell Brewer X-ray (elbow) 10.00 

Bush Rancel Bruner Fractured metatarsal 20.00 

Bush Peter Parsley X-ray (foot) 6.00 

Bush Kenneth W. Proffitt Broken tooth 20.00 

Bush Carlos Morgan Laceration — suture 5.00 

Bush xiowland Philpot X-ray (wrist) 10.00 

Bush Carl Willson Dental injury (special) 51.50 

Butler Thomas Moreland X-ray (ankle) 3.00 

Butler Dennis Moyer Dental injury (special) 50.50 

Wilbur Owen Shoulder injury (special) 150.00 

Keith Fardo Loss of tooth 25.00 

County Lowell Hammers X-ray (spine) 8.00 

County Charlie Martin X-ray (knee) 10.00 

County Lowell Hammers Back injury (special) 21.00 

County Billy Forsythe X-ray (hand) 10.00 

unty Laymon Byers X-ray (knee) 10.00 

Bill Asher Fractured humerus 68.50 

Ralph Buckley Broken nose 23.00 

James Hardin Lightning burns (special) 150.00 

Jerry Beavers Knee injury (special) 68.50 

Richard Fischer X-ray (head) 12.00 

Butler (Shively) Billy Scott X-ray (knee) 6.00 

"' ■ ' Gordon Paater X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

George Lee X-ray (elbow) 6.00 

Roy Burress X-ray (elbow) 8.00 

lames Kennon Leg injury (special) 24.25 

Joseph Starrett X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Eugene Eichenberger Broken ribs. X-ray 23.00 

Douglas Samuels Leg injury (special) 17.50 

Guthrie Garrett Hand injury (special) 38.50 

Carlisle Asbury McGuffey X-ray (ankle) 8.00 

Carlisle Gayle Wilson Leg injury (specail) 139.32 

Carrollton Donald Welch Back injury (special) 27.75 

Carrollton Ronnie Marietta Laceration — suture 5.00 

Carrollton Edwin Mason Fractured finger. X-ray 16.00 

Carrollton Arlen Hambrick X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

Carrollton Everitt Kendall X-ray (elbow) 10.00 

Carter Tex English X-ray (spine) 20.00 

Carter Jackie Kiser Fractured metacarpal. X-ray 30.00 

Carter Deward Parker Fractured tibia 50.00 

Catlettsburg Toe Griffith Laceration — suture 5.00 

Catlettsburg Tom Stewart X-ray (spine) 10.00 

Catlettsburg Bill Wynne Shoulder injury (special) 21.50 

Caverna Larry Gentry X-ray (pelvis) 7.50 

Keith Gentry Knee injury (special) 28.75 

Bobby Campbell X-ray (finger) 6.00 

Bobby Campbell Groin injury (special) 120.00 

Clarkson LeRoy Bruner X-ray (knee) 12.00 

Clay Boteler Omer X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Clay County Ronnie Shelton Laceration — suture 5.00 

Clinton County Phillip McFarland Laceration — suture 5.00 

Clinton County .Jimmy DeForest X-ray (back) 10.00 

College Parker Duncan Laceration — suture 5.00 



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THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1957 Page Fifteen 

College Dickie Thomas X-ray (elbow) 10.00 

Corbin Jack Duty Dislocated knee _'_ 36.00 

Corbin Tames D. Turrentine Fractured metatarsal 35.00 

Corbin Melvin Chandler X-ray (spine) 12.00 

Corbin Winton E. Boone Fractured radius 40.00 

Corbin Tom F. Steely Broken nose. X-ray 30.00 

Cordia Bobby Ralph Smith Laceration — suture 5.00 

Crab Orchard Kenneth McLemore X-ray (foot) 10.00 

Crab Orchard Royce Killen X-ray (spine) 7.00 

Crittenden County Bobby Don Gilland X-ray (teeth) 2.00 

Crittenden County Lige Shadowen Fractured fibula 21.00 

Crittenden County Jerry Hurst X-ray (teeth) 4.00 

Crittenden County Donald Green Loss of tooth. X-ray 27.00 

Crittenden County Larry Easley Dislocated elbow 22.00 

Cub Run Kenneth Jaggers Back injury (special) 69.75 

Cub Run Louis Thomas Fractured tibia 50.00 

Cub Run Ralph A. Thompson Broken tooth 15.00 

Cumberland Doyle Lewis X-ray (knee) 10.00 

Cumberland Don Sparks X-ray (head) 10.00 

Cumberland Maurice Creech Loss of teeth (special) 64.50 

Cynthiana William Adams X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Cynthiana Darl Feix Fractured finger. X-ray (elbow) 16.00 

Cynthiana Ottis Tussey X-ray (ankle & knee) 12.00 

Cynthiana Wayne Hill Dislocated shoulder 35.00 

Cynthiana Phillip Richie Laceration — suture 5.00 

Cynthiana Paul Ewalt X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Cynthiana Ottis Tussey Broken ribs — multiple 12.00 

Cynthiana Ronald Richie X-ray (finger) 6.00 

Cynthiana Samuel Custard Loss of tooth 4.00 

Cynthiana Donald Fuller Broken toe 15.00 

Danville Sammy McNamara Laceration — suture 5.00 

Danville Don Davis Fractured clavicle 23.00 

Danville Bernard Brant X-ray (wrist) 6.00 

Danville Glenn Alcorn Broken tooth 6.00 

Danville Larry Boyd Laceration — suture 5.00 

Danville Roger Foster Broken tooth 15.00 

Danville Earl Leverette X-ray (hip) 10.00 

Danville Roger Collins Laceration — suture 5.00 

Danville .Tackle Gritton X-ray (spine) 15.00 

Danville Roger Foster X-ray (knee) 10.00 

Danville Ernie Mace Loss of teeth 50.00 

Danville Juddy Knight X-ray (chest) 10.00 

Danville Juddy Knight X-ray (head) 10.00 

Danville Juddy Knight X-ray (finger) 7.00 

Danville Juddy Knight Broken nose 14.00 

Danville Tames Cooper X-ray (knee) 8.00 

Daviess County Don Truitt X-ray (elbow) 6.00 

Daviess County Larry Elliott Vertebra process (non-operative) 12.00 

Daviess County Randy Martin Fractured finger. X-ray 15.00 

Dayton Stanley Wessel Kidney injury (special) 29.50 

Dayton Bill Reiley X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Dayton Wendell Rumford Broken nose. X-ray 30.00 

Dayton Ronald Braun X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

duPont Manual Robert Lotz Head injury (special) 83.38 

duPont Manual .John C. Smart X-ray (back) 10.00 

duPont Manual Gary Gray X-ray (leg) 10.00 

duPont Manual George Houchin Dental linjury (special) 101.50 

duPont Manual Ed Tarter Dental injury (special) 67.50 

duPont Manual .Tames Goff Broken tooth 20.00 

duPont Manual William King Dental injury (special) 82.50 

duPont Manual Terry Williams Loss of teeth 50.00 

duPont Manual Paul Collings X-ray (rib) 10.00 

duPont Manual William Joseph Woodside X-ray (spine) 10.00 

duPont Manual Paul Prvs _ _ X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

duPont Manual Harrv Vallandingham X-ray (rib) 9.38 

duPont Manual David Ballard X-ray (shoullder) 9.38 

duPont Manual Larry Keeling X-ray (rib) — 18.75 

duPont Manual Robert Fitzpatrick X-ray (spine) 10.00 

Earlington Gene Lynn McGregor X-ray (head) 10. 00 

Earlington Harry Todd X-ray (elbow) 6.00 

Eastern Cooper Lilly X-ray (spine) 20.00 

Eastern Joey Roache Fractured radius 40.00 

Eastern Michael Hardin X-ray (leg) 6.00 

Eastern Frank Wylie X-ray (leg & arm) 12.00 

Eastern Robert Cleveland Dental injury (special) 54.00 

Eastern Earl Long __ _ Broken nose. X-rav 18.00 

Eastern Bill Fuller Fractured finger. X-ray 22.00 

Eastern .Tohn Doninprer Laceration — suture 3.85 

Eastern Tohn Cornell I^eg injury (special) 21.00 

Eastern John Libby X-ray (knee) 8.00 

Eastern Tlobert Furlong Hip injury (special) 150.00 

Eastern David Wollenhaupt Ankle injury (special) 24.00 

Eastern Tack Ruck Fractured metacarpal. X-ray 30.00 

Eastern Lester Stansberry Shoulder injury (special) 81.08 

Eastern Timmy Mardis X-ray (foot) 5.00 

Eastern David Hardin Laceration — suture 5.00 

Eastern David Hardin X-ray (foot) 6.00 

Edmonton Sartin Wallace Dental injury (special) 47.85 

Edmonton Turner Bartley Shoulder injury (special) 93.33 

Elizabethtown Terry Holman _ _X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Elizabethtown Catholic Mike Meuth __ __X-ray (ankle) 9.50 

Elkhorn TiiHv Brown Broken tooth 4.00 

Elkhorn Tommy Luscher _ __ _X-ray (soine) 10.00 

Elkhorn Tiilly Perkins Broken rib. X-ray 20.00 

Elkhorn Billy Cox X-ray (finger) 6.00 

Eminence David Wilson Laceration — suture 5.00 

Eminence Charles Raisor Hip iniury (special) 38.50 

Estill County Delmar McGee Loss of tootli 25.00 

Estill County Kenny Embry X-ray (skull) 15.00 



Page Sixteen THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1957 

Evarts Jim Toby X-ray (arm) 6.00 

Evarts Wert Pace X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Evarts Eddie Yount Loss of teeth 50.00 

Evarts Lonnie Davis X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Evarts Bobby McGlamery X-ray (elbow) 6.00 

Ezel James Henry X-ray (leg) 12.00 

Falmouth Kenneth T. Tucker X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

Falmouth David Colvin Fractured tarsal, X-ray 30.00 

Farmington Curtis Mangrum X-ray (ankle) 7.50 

Ferguson David Cowan X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Fern Creek Donald Calvert X-ray (finger) 5.00 

Fern Creek David Harrod X-ray (head) 10.00 

Fern Creek Robert Collins X-ray (finger) 5.00 

Fern Creek Jack Frick Laceration — suture 5.00 

Fern Creek Richard Schmidt Fractured metacarpal. X-ray 32.00 

Fern Creek Robert Durham X-ray (head) 10.00 

Fern Creek David Lowe Nose injury (special) 150.00 

Fern Creek Eddie Cleary X-ray (skull) 16.00 

Fern Creek Jim Trautwein X-ray (skull) 7.00 

Fern Creek Danny Judy X-ray (tooth) 2.00 

Fern Creek Phil Hanna Broken tooth. X-ray 24.00 

Flat Gap Garrett Conley X-ray (head) 20.00 

Fleming County William Jackson Broken finger, X-rar 20.00 

Frankfort Bruce Hogg X-ray (shoulder) 7.50 

Frankfort Tommy Leonard X-ray (ankle) 7.60 

Frankfort Noel .Tones X-ray (knee) 8.50 

Frankfort Donald Snyder Fractured finger 10.00 

Frankfort Donald Rhody X-ray (chest) 10.00 

Frankfort Donald Snyder Fractured finger 10.00 

Frankfort Bruce Hogg X-ray (spine) 20.00 

Frankfort Frank Tullie Broken tooth 10.00 

Frankfort John Sergent Fractured finger. X-ray , 15.00 

Frankfort Jimmy Stephens Chipped teeth. X-ray 6.00 

Frankfort .Jesse B. Thomas X-ray (knee) 12.00 

Franklin-Simpson Mark Thompson X-ray (hip) 10.00 

Franklin-Simpson Arthur Kelly Garrett X-ray (spine) 10.00 

Franklin-Simpson Ed Holcomb Fractured femur 100.00 

Franklin-Simpson J. W. Neal Fractured radius & ulna 75.00 

Franklin-Simpson Billy Gentry X-ray (skull) 10.00 

Franklin-Simpson Finis Dallas X-ray (foot) 10.00 

Franklin-Simpson Bobby Russell Dislocated shoulder 11.50 

Fordsville Darrell Tucker Fractured metacarpal 5.00 

Fordsville Mervil Wallace X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Frederick Fraize Bruce Bowman X-ray (knee) 7.00 

Frenchburg .Tames Richard Barker X-ray (back) 5.00 

Fulton Duncan Bushart Knee iniurv (special) 16.50 

Fulton Harold Frazier Broken finger 10.00 

Fulton .Johnny Jones Knee injury Ispecial) 17.75 

Fulton David Holland Fractured metatarsal ?6.00 

Fulton David Holland Fractured metatarsal 22.50 

Fulton Dale Breeden Broken finger 10.00 

Fulton .Toe .Tohnson Laceration — suture 5.00 

Fulton Bud White Laceration — suture 5.00 

Fulton Ronald McAlister Foot injury (special) 19.00 

Fulton Joe Tohnson Laceration — suture 5.00 

Fulton George Burnette Laceration — suture 5.00 

Fulton Johnny Jones Fractured ulna 12.50 

Fulton .Terry House Fractured fibula 9.00 

Fulton Philip Jeffress Fractured radius 37.50 

Garth James SulUvan X-ray (knee) 8.00 

Garth Roger Redd'ng X-ray (knee) 8.00 

Garth .Tames E. Lewis X-ray (snine) 12.00 

Garth Tarlton Thomas Broken finger 8.00 

Garth .Tack .Tennings X-ray (wrist) 6.00 

Glasgow Barlow Ronp X-ray (head) 7.50 

Glasgow .Tames A. Staples Fractured metatarsal. X-ray 31.00 

Glasgow Roy Ramsey X-rav (shoulder & chest) 14.00 

Glasgow Curtis PuUiam Head injury (special) 28.00 

Glasgow .Tohn Anderson Loss of tooth, chipped teeth 35.00 

Glasgow Richard Wheeler X-ray (foot) 6.00 

Glasgow .Tackle Stanles X-ray (ankle) 12.00 

Glasgow Bartlett Dickinson Broken tooth, X-rav 22.00 

Glasgow .Tohn Anderson knee injury (special) 26.50 

Glendale Larry Hatfield Ankle injury (special) 20.50 

Glendale Dallas Hicks X-ray (back) 16.00 

Grant County Leon Cummins Fractured metatarsal, X-iay 36.00 

Greensburg Shelby Gumm X-ray (pelvis) 12.00 

Greensburg Finis W. Durrett X-ray (spine & pelvis) 15.00 

Guthrie Tommy Cannon Back injury (snecial) 18.25 

Harlan Happy Cawood Fractured femur 40.00 

Harlan Sam Brown X-ray (hand) 6.00 

Harlan Albert Scalf Fractured metacarnal 20.00 

Harlan Robert Roark Knee iniurv fsnecial) 150.00 

Harlan Jimmie Asher X-ray (skull & head) 20.00 

Harlan Bobby Tinsley X-ray (hand) 5.00 

Harlan .Tames (Dickie) Parsons X-rav (wrist) 12.00 

Harlan Robert Roark. .Tr. X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Harlan Charles G. Howard X-ray (ankle) 5.00 

Harlan David Cawood X-ray (finger) 5.00 

Harlan Timmy Asher X-ray (hand & foot) 10.00 

Harlan Perry Walls X-ray (shoulder) 5.00 

Harlan * Bud Asher Knee injury (special) 16.50 

Harlan Bud Asher X-ray (knee) 5.00 

Harlan Randy Myers X-ray (chest & hand) 10.00 

Harlan Dewey Blanton X-ray (hand) 6.00 

Harlan Dale .Tackson X-ray (chest) 5.00 

Harlan George Pollite X-ray (hand) 5.00 

Harlan Bobby Tinsley X-ray (ankle) 5.00 

Harlan Bill Walls X-ray (wrist) 5.00 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1957 Page Seventeen 



Harlan Garrett Gross X-ray (shoulder) 5.00 

Harlan - David Cawood X-ray (kneel 5.00 

Harlan IIII_" Carmen Wright X-ray (hand) 5.00 

Harlan I Cecil Bard X-ray (knee) 5.00 

Harlan Sonny Shepherd Replaced fillings 16.00 

Harlan Perry Walls Broken facing 6.00 

Harrison County Jimmy Casey X-ray (ankle) 7.50 

Harrison County Tom McKee Laceration — suture 5.00 

Harrison County Wayne Carroll Laceration — suture 5.00 

Harrodsburg Bill Claunch Fractured radius 40.00 

Harrodsburg III_II_I Charlie Burton X-ray (foot) 12.00 

Harrodsburg Ben Lykins Dislocated shoulder 35.00 

Harrodsburg Harry Sherrow Laceration — suture 5.00 

Harrodsburg Ronald Adkinson Dislocated wrist 11.50 

Harrodsburg IIIIII William Howell X-ray (spine & shoulder) 17.00 

Hazard Aster Sizemore Knee injury (special) 150.00 

Hazard IIII I Bobby Joe Bellis X-ray (pelvis) 7.50 

Hazard Tom Fitzpatrick Laceration — suture 5.00 

Hazard James Ozee X-ray (knee) 7.60 

Hazard __PhiI Turner Laceration — suture 5.00 

Hazard ZIIIIIIIIII Bradley Smyly X-ray (shouldler) 10.00 

Hazel T. G. Curd. .Tr. Laceration — suture 5.00 

Hazel I I_II..-IIIIIII T. G. Curd, Jr. X-ray (ankle) 9.00 

Hazel Green Academy Phillip Finch Hand injury (special) 86.35 

Henry Clay _ _ Sam Sousley X-ray (spine) 20.00 

Henry Clay _I_IIIII I..__II"Paul White Dislocated knee 30.30 

Henry Clay II IIII " I .Ronnie Mareum X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Henry Clay 11-"~Z1 Z" Jo^ White Fractured fibula 50.00 

Henry Clay II . I .' _I"""lDeIza Maggard X-ray (foot & ankle) 10.00 

Hickman _ II__I II I_I"__II__'^''''''y Williams Head injury (special) 43.05 

Hickman _I__ __I_I _I__ _Harold Bequette , ^Dislocated hip 50.00 

TT.vhlnnris " "" """ "" Allen Anderson Broken nose 20.00 

Hi^h and« Dan Beinke Broken ribs— multiple 20.00 

Hi^hlanH^ Ray Howard X-ray (knee) 6.00 

H eh ands Douglas Ogden Broken nose. X-ray 26.00 

Hlh=nH, Allen Anderson Broken finger. X-ray 16.00 

Highlands Paul Finneseth X-ray (foot) 6.00 

Slh ands Gary Cochran X-ray (toe) 6.00 

Hilhlands """I"IIIIIir"III'I Lee Bryson X-ray (chest) 10.00 

Highlands ~ ^ II I^ichie Emmons Broken finger 10.00 

Hio-hlnnds Gary Cochran X-ray (hip) 10.00 

Hilhlands IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIP<'te Erschell X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

HiJhlanrts Ken Hodges X-ray (wrist) 6.00 

Highlands r'Iir~IIIIIIIIIIIIII~I"rom Sadosky X-ray (chest) 10.00 

Highlands IIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIIII-I-iP°"e Martin X-ray (leg) 6.00 

Highlands Larry Lee X-ray (wrist) 6.00 

Tr,vh1and<i ~" "Eddie Noel X-ray (chest) 10.00 

Highlands Denny McAtee X-ray (skull) 10.00 

Hie-hlands " "Bob Goes Leg injury (special) 89.13 

Hilhlands ~~II r"I"riIIIIIir"'*o''ert Dumar Broken nose 18.00 

Highlands _ III II _ "Doug Martin Laceration — suture (two claims) 10.00 

Hie-hlands ~ " ~ ~ David Sowers Laceration — suture 5.00 

Hilhlands 'IIIII"iriIIiriIIIIIIII''''e<' Crawford X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Highlands " " ' Tim Flaig Broken finger 10.00 

Hilhlands ""IIIir'T'I IIII Do"Bh Martin X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Highlands __ _ II_I _II Panny Sarakatsannis Fractured radius & ulna 75.00 

Highlands " "Denny McAtee X-ray (arm) 6.00 

Hilhlands _I__ I'll _II ~ Jl~^°^ Borches Broken nose 20.00 

Highlands _ _ IIII_I " _ " ]Teff Pence Dislocated shoulder 15.00 

Hiseville I_I III~I_II IIII P'^t^ Peterson Broken clavicle 35.00 

Hodgenville _I _ II "Larry Bale X-ray (finger) 9.00 

Holy Cross ~ mil" I" ~ ~ _~Richard Gutman Shoulder injury (special) 41.00 

Holy Cross II~ III~III_I~II_ -^^^ry Rump X-ray (foot) 5.00 

Holy Cross ~ __ " I I _I'''" Klein Tendon — separation from bone 6.00 

Hopkinsville ""__"~I __ _II__'*''^* Lackev Wrist injury (special) 49.30 

Horse Branch _II_I III "II Paul Embry Fractured tarsal. X-ray 35.00 

Howevallev _ "Donald Morgan Laceration — suture 5.00 

Irvine . I___ "IIIII ""Tyrone Witt X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

Irvine _Z I" IIIIIIIII Harold Kinpr X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

Irvine - III- _II I ^'^homas Bradford -. Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Irvine _~ IIIII___I _ Dienzel Dennis Fractured fibula 50.00 

Irvine ~_ _ I_III_ " -"^^^ Pat Yea"-er Laceration — suture 5.00 

Irvine _IIII II _I """Hubert Durb'n Fractured tibia 15.00 

Irvine I II _IIII_ _ _I ~ __'^^^"" Sexton Spleen — ruptured 60.00 

Jenkins"" " _I_I__ "I_ Tommy Blair Fractured ulna 24.50 

Jenkins I I_III _I "lames Morgan Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Jenkins II _ III Charlels Maggard X-ray (spine) 10.00 

Jenkins '_ I_IIII_I_ II ^'^^ Howard Ankle injury (special) 41.75 

Jenkins I_ I_III I [Kenneth England Knee injury (snecial) 72.25 

Jenkins I__ _I I III_I" Danny Stidham Dental injury (special) 33.25 

Junction City _ _ "I "II _""Ronald Clem Replaced knocked out filling 5.00 

Junction City _I_III_ I_II__IIII Tames Turner Knee injury (special) 125. "0 

Junction City _ _ _I __ T!obby Antle X-ray (spine) 20.00 

Junction C'ty _I_I"I_ I I_ _III_ "Donnie Carter Laceration — suture 5.00 

Kingdom Come _ _I— I_I__II Wendell Whitaker Leg injury (special) 101. 18 

Kirksey " """"William Edwards X-ray (pelvis & wrist) 12.50 

Kirksey _ IIII" ".Tackie Garrison X-ray (ank'o) 5.00 

Knox Central ~I"III"II "_ "Clarence R. Patterson Fractured fibula ■ 50.00 

Knox Central I_I I I I_II_ Preston Martin Broken rib 20.00 

Knox Central I_-I-I_I.___I_I__IIIIITohn Shelton X-ray (anklel) 8.00 

Knox Central Kelent Valentme X-ray (arm) 5.00 

Knox Central I III___I__ "Windell Crawford X-ray (knee) 8.00 

Knox Central I_ """Vencil Phinos Loss of teeth 31.00 

Knox Central IIII__IIIIIIIIII _ If"en D. Mills Loss of tooth 25.00 

Knox Central II I_I^'T'ov Ferguson Broken teeth 10.00 

Knox Central I _ II I ^Windell Crawford Loss of tooth 25.00 

Knox Central I_I IIIIII_III H^encil Phipns Broken teeth 10.00 

Knox Central I_ """"Preston Martin X-ray (wrist) 6.00 

Knox Central _I"_ " III I^on Piekard Laceration — suture 6.00 



Page Eighteen THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1957 

Kyrock Lonard Webb X-ray (skull, pelvis & knee) 26.00 

Kyrock Morris Kich Dislocated ankle. X-ray 28.50 

Lafayette Leon Newton Laceration — suture 5.00 

Lafayette Frank Martin Z X-ray (ankle) 11.00 

Lafayette Gene Robbins I„X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Lafayette Bill Stephens Dislocated shoulder 35.00 

Lafayette Connie .Tohns X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

Lafayette Donnie Bates X-ray (skull, pelvis & knee) 26.00 

Lafayette Donnie Bates Broken thumb, X-ray 22.00 

Lafayette Finley Stamatis Finger injury (special) 54.50 

Lafayette Allen .lohnson X-ray (chest) 15.00 

Lafayette Foyster Hogg Foot injury (special) 78.90 

Lafayette Kenny Jayne Fractured fibula 50.00 

Lafayette Robert Mulfinger X-ray (hand) 7.50 

Lafayette .James Gladden Laceration — suture 5.00 

Lafayette Mike Hopkins Broken finger. X-ray 16.50 

Lafayette Ray Appley X-ray (shoulder) 12.50 

Lafayette Charles Ferguson Laceration — suture 5.00 

Lafayette Dave Ravencraft X-ray (shoulder) 11.00 

Lafayette William Seale X-ray (hand) 7.50 

Lafayette ^obbv Newsome Broken finger. X-ray 13.80 

Lafayette Kenneth Honican X-ray (ankle) 7.50 

Lafayette William Seale Nose injury (special) 35.00 

Lafayette Bobby Cook Fractured radius 33.00 

Lafayette .John .Jenkins X-ray (chest) 5.00 

Lafayette Bobbv Powell X-ray (back) 20.00 

Lafayette Eugene Ellis X-ray (ankle) 8.50 

Lafayette Phillip Stump Knee injury (special) 33.25 

Lafayette Eugene Ellis X-ray (knee) 8.50 

Lafayette Finns Gibson Loss of tooth. X-ray 31.00 

Lafayette Donald Stump Loss of teeth 50.00 

Lebanon Bobby Harmon Broken ribs — multiple 40.00 

Lebanon .Jackie Owen Broken teeth X-ray 42.00 

Lee County Danny White Laceration — suture 5.00 

Lee County Hershel Harvey Broken finger 10.00 

Lee County Trov Napier X-ray (hand) 6.00 

Leitchfield Dickie Roberts X-ray (shoulder) 7.50 

Leitchfield Bobby Bland X-ray (hand) 6.00 

Letcher Rill Back Loss of tooth. X-ray 27.00 

Livermore Lester Humphrey .l_X-ray (hand) 1().00 

Livermore Carol Ray Cook Fractured fibula 36.00 

Lloyd Bill Bninner Hand injury (special) 35.75 

Lloyd Don Knapmeyer Loss of tooth 25.00 

Lloyd James Robinson Fractured tibia 45.00 

Lloyd David Ratcliff Arm injury (special) 16.00 

Lloyd Teoffrey Long Fractured metatarsal 25.00 

Lloyd Gilbert Fleek X-ray (elbow) 10.00 

Lloyd Charles Sims Knee injury (special) 25.00 

London Herschel Cornn Back injury (special) 24.00 

Louisa Tody Adams Dislocated shoulder 35.00 

Louisa -Tim Moore Chest injury (special) 15.50 

Louisa -Tody Adams Dislocated shoulder 25.00 

Louisa Ronnie Dotson Fractured metacarpal. X-ray 26.00 

Louisa -Jim Moore Knee injury (special) 150.00 

Louisa Ronnie Dotson Loss of teeth 50.00 

Ludlow William Young Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Ludlow Edwin Trammel X-ray (shoulder) 20.00 

Ludlow Tack Howell X-ray (shoulder) 6.00 

Ludlow Tack Howell X-ray (arm) 6.00 

Ludlow Ollie Stucker Fractured tibia 21.00 

Ludlow Larry Price Reopened claim on dental injury (special) 75.00 

Lynch .John Staley Broken finger 16.00 

Lynch .Jack Adams Dislocated elbow, X-ray 37.00 

Lynn Camp Harold Reedy X-ray (leg) 10.00 

Lynnvale Tames Richard .Jenkins Broken tooth 5.00 

Lynnvale Don Richardson Replaced knocked o-it fillings 12.00 

Lynnvale Larry Skees Nose injury (special) 30.55 

Lynnvale Richard Harned X-ray (wrist) 12.00 

Lynnvale Havward Meredith Hand injury (spec'al) 22.25 

McDowell Bill Stanton X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

McDowell Demoris Martin X-ray (ankle) 12.00 

McDowell Bobby King Laceration — suture 5.00 

McKee Lee Dunsil Fractured metacarpal. X-ray 32.00 

McKell Vaughn Rowe Fractured femur 100.00 

Madison-Central Kirby Allen X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Mad'son-Central Raymond Ross Laceration — suture 5.00 

Madison-Central Darrell Fritz Laceration— suture 5.00 

Madison-Central "Sherman Young X-ray (wrist) 6.00 

Madison-Central Donald Best Ankle injury (special) 51.60 

Madison-Central Roger Short X-ray (skull) 12.00 

Madison-Central Neal May X-ray (elbow) 6.00 

Midison-Central Carter Brandenburg X-ray (wrist) 12.00 

Madison-Central Timmv Ashcraft X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

Madison-Model Allen Hughes X-ray (teeth) 2.00 

Madison-Model Wayne Bowlin X-ray (elbow) G.OO 

Mad'son-Model Johnnv Greene Broken tooth 5.00 

Madison-Model J. I. Isbell X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Madison-Model Jerry Walker X-ray (ankle) 6.0T 

Madison-Model Ernest Aldridge X-ray (finger) 6.00 

Madison-Model .Jimmy Hinkle X-ray (knee) 10.00 

Mad''son-Model Danny Presnell X-ray (pelvis) 10.00 

Madison-Model : Allen Hughes X-ray (tooth) 2.00 

Madison-Model Kenard Bosley X-ray (elbow) 6.00 

Madisonville .James Miner X-ray (elbow) 6.00 

Madisonville Darrell Ashby X-ray (hand) 6.00 

Madisonville Bill Haworth X-ray (spine & skull) 20.00 

Madisonville Larrv Wilson X-ray (wrist) 6.00 

Madisonville Barry Poole X-ray (leg) 6.00 

Madisonville Bill Haworth X-ray (ankle) 6.00 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1957 Page Nineteen 

Madisonville Jiiimiy woodruff X-ray (.skull), laceration — suture 15.00 

Madisonville Jimmy Woodruff Laceration — suture. X-ray (skull) 15.00 

Madisonville Ronnie Kutlelr X-ray (pelvis & spine) 10.00 

Madisonville Konnie Eauh X-ray (spine) 10. OU 

Madisonville Sim Smith X-ray (chest) 10.00 

Madisonville Bobby Jones Dentall injury (special) 83.60 

Magnolia James H. Ragland Laceration — suture 5.00 

Marion _ Kandall Chandler Dislocated shoulder 35.00 

Marion Ted Travis X-ray (ankle) 8.00 

Mayslick Victor Jienton X-ray (hand) 10.00 

Middleburg Lonnie Mullins Fractured radius 40.00 

Middlesboro Charles Kelly X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Middlesboro Clyde Mason X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Middiesboro Huston Ball Laceration — suture 5.00 

Middlesboro Harvey Yeary X-ray (rib) 10.00 

Middlesboro Ben Miller Back injury (special) 23.63 

iniddiesDoro Terry Gooding X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

MiddlesDoro David Hatfield Laceration — suture 5.00 

Middlesboro John Goins Broken facing 5.00 

Middlesboro Ules Day X-ray (ankle) 7.50 

Middlesboro Lyle Mace Broken tooth. X-ray 21.00 

Middlesboro Charles Kelley Fractured clavicle 35.00 

middlesboro Frank White X-ray (finger) 5.00 

Middlesboro Tommy Stapleton X-ray (back) 10.00 

Middlesboro Bobby Barton X-ray (tooth) 2.00 

Middlesboro Karl Brittain Broken teeth. X-ray 42.00 

Middlesboro Johnny Connor X-ray (teeth) 4.00 

Middlesboro Karl Brittain Broken teeth 10.00 

Middlesboro Ben Miller Ankle injury (special) 20.00 

Milburn Flavious Burgess Laceration — suture 5.0O 

Monticello David Kenney Kice Fractured tibia 31.00 

Morgan James Godman Broken nose. X-ray 30.00 

Morgan County Bobby Rose X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

Morganfield Bill Wathen Dislocated shoulder 24.00 

Morganfield Bobby Nay X-ray (chest) 12.50 

Morganfield Bruce Bell Laceration — suture 5.00 

Morganfield Eddie Collins Laceration — suture 5.00 

Morganfield Steve Crooke Broken tooth 16.00 

Morganfield William Wathen X-ray (finger) 6.00 

Morganfield Warren Riley Dislocated shoulder 35.00 

Morganfield William Wathen Dislocated shoulder 24.00 

Morganfield Bruce Bell X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Morganfield Bobby Nay Broken ribs — multiple 15.00 

Morganfield Larry Lovell Knee injury (special) 39.50 

Morganfield George Edward Collins —X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Morganfield John Shelton X-ray (elbow) 6.00 

Morganfield Charles Thomas X-ray (rib) 10.00 

Morganfield Paul Woodring X-ray (pelvis) 20.00 

Morganfield Stewart Elliott Laceration — suture 5.00 

Morganfield Tommy Omer Laceration — suture 5.00 

Morganfield Bobby .Toe Rudd Laceration — suture 5.00 

Morganfield Eddie Collins Laceration — suture 5.00 

Morganfield Bruce Bell Laceration — suture 5.00 

Morganfield Tommy Omer Dental injury (special) 21.50 

Morganfield Steve Crooke X-ray (finger) 7.00 

Morganfield Bennie Kramer Loss of teeth 50.00 

Morganfield Jim Fisher Loss of teeth 50.00 

Morganfield Ronnie Hite Finger injury (special) 36.25 

Morganfield Donald Troutman Laceration — suture 5.00 

Morganfield Tommy Gibson Laceration — suture 5.00 

Morganfield Larry Lovell X-ray (knee) 9.00 

Morganfield Bill Wathen Dislocated shoulder 8.00 

Morganfield Bobby Nay Broken teeth X-ray 32.00 

Morganfield Tony Murray X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Morganfield Jim Fisher X-ray (chest) 10.00 

Morganfield Johnnie Shelton X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Mt. Sterling Doyle Duff X-ray (head) 10.00 

Mt. Sterling David Black Loss of tooth 3.00 

Mt. Sterling Rodney Nixon X-ray (finger) 5.00 

Mt. Sterling Buddy Messer X-ray (foot & finger) 12.00 

Mt. Sterling David Black X-ray (shoulder) 20.00 

Mt. Sterling Charles Vice Leg injury (special) 17.60 

Mt. Sterling Stewart Gatewood X-ray (finger) 5.00 

Mt. Sterling Eddie Bayes X-ray (wrist) 7.50 

Mt. Sterling Dudley Pendleton X-ray (foot) 6.00 

Mt. Sterling Doyle Duff X-ray (ankle & foot) 7.60 

Mt. Sterling Robert Goldey Loss of teeth 6.00 

Mt. Sterling Dan McDonald Knee injury (special) 150.00 

Mt. Vernon Jimmy Pitman X-ray (ankle) 7.50 

Mt. Washington Ralph Coomer X-ray (skull) 10.00 

Muhlenberg Central Frank Fitzhugh X-ray (ankle) 5.00 

Muhlenberg Central Frank Fitzhugh Laceration — suture 5.00 

Muhlenberg Central Donald Harkins X-ray (leg) 6.00 

Murray Glenn Brewer Knee injury (special) 19.00 

Murray John Koertner X-ray (leg) 6.00 

Murray Kenneth Farrell Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Murray Ronald Kelley Laceration — suture 5.00 

Murray Jimmy Cross Fractured metacarpal 19.00 

Murray John Koertner X-ray (hand) 12.00 

Murray Gene King X-ray (elbow) 6.00 

Murray .Terry Buchman Fractured radius 40.00 

Murray Carl Stout Laceration — suture 5.00 

Murray Dan Parker Broken tooth 11.00 

Murray Gerald Tabers Loss of tooth. X-ray 27.00 

Murray Billy McLemore X-ray (knee) 6.00 

New Concord Bobby Osbran Dislocated ankle 11.00 

Newport Earl Kew X-ray (ankle) 5.00 

Newport Richard Wallace X-ray (skull) 16.00 

Newport Wayne Hetteberg Laceration — suture 5.00 



Page Twenty 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR AUGUST, 1957 



Newport 

Newport 

Newport 

Newport 

Newport 

Newport 

Newport 

Newport 

Newport 

Newport 

Newport 

Newport 

Newport Catholic __ 

Newport Catholic 

Newport Catholic 

Newport Catholic 

Newport Catholic __ 
Newport Catholic __ 

Newport Catholic 

Newport Catholic __ 

Newport Catholic 

Newport Catholic 

Newport Catholic __ 

Newport Catholic 

Newport Catholic 

Newport Catholic 

New Concord 

New Concord 

Nicholas County 

Nicholasville 

Nicholasville 

Nicholasville 

Nicholasville 

North Marshall 

North Marshall 

North Middletown _ 

Oil Springs 

Old Kentucky Home 

Oldham County 

County 

County 

County 



ty 



Oldhi 
Oldh; 
Oldh; 

Oldham Coi 
Orangeburg 
Owen County _ 
Owsley County 
Paducah Tilghi 
Paducah Tilghi 
Paducah Tilghi 
Paducah Tilghi 
Paducah Tilghi 
Paducah Tilghi 
Paducah Tilghi 
Paducah Tilghi 



._Don Ratliff X-ray (hand) 6.00 

bob Lee Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Steve Bohlinger Broken teeth 40.00 

._Willilam Pelirey Broken tooth 20.00 

_.Vic scharstein X-ray (leg) 6.00 

__Charles Crowe X-ray (wrist) 6.00 

iiirnest Blaut Nose injury (special) 123.50 

_.i{oland Daniel Fractured fibula 50.00 

.-Jerry Jones X-ray (head) 10.00 

__Cecil Turner X-ray (nose) 5.00 

__Cecil Turner Knee injury (special) 150.00 

-.Howard Miller Nose injury (special) 142.98 

--Robert Schneider Laceration — suture 5.00 

Kichard j^'rommeyer Laceration — suture 5.00 

—Jerry Glaser Broken nose 13.00 

--Paul Purcell X-ray (chest) 10.00 

George Grause X-ray (finger) 10.00 

--Lawrence Davis Fractured finger 15.00 

—Dave Taueber X-ray (foot) 10.00 

Robert Ferring Fractured ulna 40.00 

—Richard Hewling Dislocated elbow 21.00 

-.Dan Burns X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

Howard Theis Finger injury (special) 24.00 

—William Roell X-ray (spine & pelvis) 15.00 

-.Robert Zimmerman X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

Richard Hewling Arm injury (special) 129.00 

..Glen Stubblefield Fractured patella 5.00 

—William G. Marr Dislocated knee -' 7.00 

—John Baker Loss of tooth 26.00 

Billy Arvin Dislocated shoulder, dislocated finger 45.00 

-_Len Goss X-ray (knee) 10.00 

—Billy Thornton X-ray (hand) 10.00 

--Sam Gorman Fractured pelvis 20.00 

R. M. Spiceland Knee injury (special) 150.00 

^.limmy Lampley Back injury (special) 92.85 

—Bobby Steele X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Don McKenzie Laceration — suture 5.00 

..Leon Cundiff Fractured tibia & fibula 90.00 

..Franklin Osborne X-ray (chest) 10.00 

-.Kenneth Leet X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

—Lowell Coates X-ray (rib) 10.00 

—Bobby Leet X-ray (shoullder) 10.00 

Tommy Gowin Fractured radius (special) 43.75 

—Alfred Thomas, Jr. X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

—Harry Clifton Dental injury (special) 37.00 

—Paul Day Loss of tooth X-ray 27.00 

..Phillip Gibbs Knee injury (special) 37.50 

—Bill Ashley X-ray (shoullder) 20.00 

—Ernest Hannin X-ray (leg) 6.00 

Henry Clark Laceration — suture 5.00 

Larry Jones X-ray (finger) 5.00 

Jim Hardy Fractured finger, X-ray 20.00 

—David Rudd X-ray (foot) 5.00 

.Terry Beavins Laceration — suture 5.00 



(Continued in September Issue of the ATHLETE) 



Attention, Swimming Coaches! 

In recent years, several requests have come to 
the State Office of the K.H.S.A.A. concerning- the 
advisability of scheduling- the Class A Swimming- 
Meet on a February date. Principals of Class A 
schools were polled in an effort to determine their 
wishes. The majority favored a February date. 
The 1957 Class A meet is scheduled for Februai'y 
22. The meet for Classes B and C will be held on 
April 5. 



(Continued from Page Three) 

Secretary-Treasurer Sanford presented a list 
of claims which had been paid by the Protection 
Fund since April 27, 1957, the total amount of these 
claims being- $3,186.20. K. G. Gillaspie moved, sec- 
onded by Cecil A. Thornton, that the claims as pre- 
sented by the Secretary-Treasurer of the Protection 
Fund be allowed. The motion was carried unan- 
imously. 

There being no further business, the meeting- 
adjourned. 



TRACK MEET 

(Continued from Inside Front Cover) 

3. Thunning — St. Joseph 
5. Williams — ^Dayton 

Distance: 20' 11" 
High Jump — 

1. Westmeier — St. Xavier 
1. Jackson — Valley 
1. Johnson — Lacy 

4. Williams — Dayton 

4. Richard — St. Joseph 

Height: 5' 9" 
TOTAL POINTS 
St. Xavier 42 1/3 



Central (Louisville) 29 1/2 

duPont Manual 17 

Paducah Tilghman 16 

Eastern 13 

St. Joseph 13 

Hopkinsville 12 

K. M. I. 9 1/2 

Bourbon County 9 

Highlands 9 

Shawnee 9 

Lafayette 8 1/2 

Ashland 8 

M. M. I. 8 

Dixie Heights 6 

Barbourville 6 



Henderson (city) 5 

Lacy 4 1/3 

Valley 4 1/3 

Bellevue 4 

Bardstown 3 

Scott County 3 

Dayton 2 1/2 

Beechwood 2 

Fern Creek 2 

Glasgow 2 

Madisonville 2 

Newport 2 

Southern 2 

Crofton 1 

Trinity 1 



U. of K. Coaching Clinic 



You probably visited oui* display at the Coliseum during the University of 
Kentucky Coaching Clinic in Lexington, Kentucky, on August 8, 9 and 
10, 1957. 

We will be able to take care of your football order in a most satisfactory 
manner, as our stock is more complete than ever. 

On special-made merchandise we feel confident that we can have the 
merchandise in your possession in due time for your requirements. 

Any shipments made during the month of August will carry October 1, 
1957 dating. 

On your incidental supplies check up on the following: 

Football tees, table pumps, electric inflators, shoulder 
pad laces, pant laces, shoe laces, plastic face guards, 
rubber teeth guards or protectors, helmet paint for 
leather or plastic helmets, all kinds of chin straps, 
aluminum cleats, rubber cleats, dry stag line white for 
marking football fields, blocking dummies, line markers, 
linesmen's chains, goal line markers, sideline markers, 
football goal posts, sideline capes. Fair Play football 
scoreboards. Fair Play basketball scoreboards, portable 
bleachers, dry or wet lime markers. Whirlpool Baths, 
Vibra Whirl Baths by Cramer, football posters, first- 
aid kits, Cramer's first-aid supplies, a complete line of 
practice jerseys, sweat socks, athletic supporters. Grid 
football scoreboards, surgical scissors. 

We will be looking forward to seeing you at various times throughout the 
year, so drop by to see our displays. 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 

PHONE 104 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

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the year as usual — Hariy Blackburn, 1340 Linwood Ave., Columbus, 
Ohio, will cover the Big Sandy Valley; Bob Reis, 74 Pleasant Ridge Ave., 
South Fort Mitchell, Ky., will cover Northern, Central and Eastern Ken- 
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and Southern Kentucky, and Al LeComte, 600 Orchard Drive, Louisville, 
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High School Athlete 

K. H. S. A. A. SCHOOL FOR BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Arnett Strong, R. 14; Roy Settle, R. 3; Dave Longe- 
necker, R. 7; John Crosthwaite, R. 13; James Jenkins, R. 5. Second Row: Ernie 
Chattin, R. 16; Ben Topmiller, R. 4; Howard Gardner R. 6; Amos Teague, R. 2; Bennie 
Bridges, R. 10; Harry Stephenson, R. 11. Third Row: Elmo Mead, R. 8; Dick Looney, 
R. 15; Charlie Vettiner, School Director; Rex Alexander, R. 1; R. K. Padgett, R. 12; 
Ralph Mussman, R. 9. 



Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 
SEPTEMBER - 1957 



C. K. C. Officials Conduct Meeting 



The Officials Booking Department of the Cen- 
tral Kentucky Conference conducted a two-day 
meeting- for football officials on August 9-10 in 
Lexington. The sessions were well attended by 
members of the local organization, and also present 
were representatives of most of the area organiza- 
tions of football officials in Kentucky. 

The officials from the various groups w-re: 
Howard "Pete" Bennett, Western Kentucky Officials- 
Association; Harold Sauter, Falls Cities Football 
Officials Association; Dave Longeneeker, Metropoli- 
tan Football Officials Association; Bill Gammon, 
Northeastern Kentucky Officials Association; Ralpn 
Mussman, Northern Kentucky Officials Association; 
Kean Jenkins, South Central Kentucky Officials 
Association; Bernard Johnson, Officials Booking 
Department of the Central Kentucky Conference. 

Jim Barlow of the Officials Booking Depart- 
ment arranged the program and was in general 
charge of the sessions. The officials were welcomed 
to the meeting by Newell Hadden, Jr., president of 
the local organization. 

The program consisted of panel discussions on 
rules interpretations, led by Dave Longeneeker. An 
outdoor demonstration was moderated by Bill Gam- 
mon and "Pete" Bennett. The rules changes were 
discussed by Thomas P. Bell, one of the clinic 
directors for the K.H.S.A.A. Coach John Heber, 
Henry Clay Hig'h School, explained "What a Coach 
Wants in an Official." 

In addition to covering the rules changes, the 
group spent much time on controversial questions 
relating to rules interpretations and officiating 
procedure. 

The most important items covered and the 
recommendations adopted were as follows: 

1. FAIR CATCH SIGNAL: It is believed the 
present signal is understood and adequate. However, 
it was suggested particular emphasis should be 
placed on the waving of the extended arm to show 
that a fair catch is being clearly called for. 

2. TIME ON FIELD: It was suggested the 
umpire keep the time on the field. This will result 
in n. ore accurate time-keeping, and will relieve the 
field judge of this responsibility. This will be espec- 
iallly helpful on pass and kicking plays as well as 
out-of-bounds plays and during official's time-outs. 

3. ALTERNATE TIME CLOCK: It was recom- 
mended a watch be taken on the field by the of- 
ficials even though the field clock is the official 
time. This policy will be helpful in the event the 
field clock should fail to function properly during- 
the g-ame. It was considered optional whether the 
alternate clock should be actually running or mere- 
ly caified in case of emergency. 

4. POSITION OF FIELD JUDGE: It is felt 
the field judge should be on the line to detect illegal 
use of hands, off-sides, and other snap infractions. 
It is believed the field judge is still in a position to 
cover situations down field. Of course considering- 
individual preferences, on obvious pass or punt situa- 
tions the field judge may vary his position accord- 
ingly. However, if at all possible he should maintain 
his position on the line even during these play 
situations. 

5. POSaTIONS DURING TIME-OUTS: In 
order that officials may rapidly assume their posi- 
tions following a time-out it is recommended the 
umpire take the defensive team, the field judge take 



the offensive team, the linesman be on the ball, 
and the i-eferee be free. 

6. IMPROPER ALIGNMENT. This was a mat- 
ter which received attention last year. Naturally, 
officials should do what they can to assist players 
in proper alignment. However, if the infraction 
occurs, it should be penalized as there "will be no 
"first warning." In this respect it should be noted 
the team should be cautioned immediately upon 
breaking from the huddle and coming up to the 
line, and cautioned once only. After taking their 
position on the line no further warning should be 
given as this may result in causing an illegal shift 
or an illegal procedure infraction. 

7. INCOMPLETE PASS OR FUMBLE: This is 
another item which received attention last year. It 
was agreed that two factors enter into considera- 
tion: first, the arm of the passer must have started 
in a forward motion; and, secondly, it is left to the 
official's judgment as to whether "the ball had left 
the passer's hand. 

8. ACTION OF OFFICIAL CALLING FOUL: 
The official who calls a foul should promptly inform 
the referee WHO, WHAT, WHERE, and WHEN. 
He should also escort any disqualified player to the 
side line and inform the coach the nature of the 
infraction and other particulars. Each official should 
assist the referee, and in case of error in enforce- 
ment of a penalty promptly call the referee's atten- 
tion to it. It is not necessary to notify the coach of 
the violator on each penalty. However, all particulars 
on major fouls should be noted on the official's card 
in case the coach should inquire later. 

9. FALSE START: Attention was called to the 
rule change this year in which an interior lineman 
may not change his position after assuming the 
three point stance. Also attention was called to 
the action of any offensive player which might simu- 
late the action at the snap and tend to draw an 
opponent off-side. It is not necessary to actually 
draw an opponent off-side to be a false start. 

10. COACHING FROM THE SIDELINES: 
With the new rule in effect this year permitting- one 
player to talk with one coach at the sideline during 
any charged time-out, it was thought perhaps players 
and coaches will think they have this privilege at 
all times when the clock is stopped. It should be 
emphasized to the coach and captain in the pre- 
game conference that this is permissible only dur- 
ing a charged time-out and not during official's 
time-out or between quaiters. Officials should use 
their discretion and caution a player if it is ob-vious 
he intends to do this illegally. However, if a player 
is conversing with a coach at a sideline during an 
official's time-out or between quarters it must be 
enforced as coaching from the sidelines with a 15 
yard penalty. Please emphasize this to the coach and 
team captain before the game. 

11. APPLICATION OF RULE 1: It is the re- 
sponsibility of competing teams to abide by the 
provisions set out in Rule 1. Any team who fails to 
have the field properly marked,, flags furnished, 
etc., is violating Rule 1. Such infractions should be 
promptly reported to the Commissioner's office. It 
was recommended the referee notify the home team 
the week before the g-ame by post card, stating the 
time of the game, time officials will arrive, and 
requesting the home team have the field properly 
marked and the boxman and chain crew ready with 
the chains and box approximately 30 minutes before 
game time. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



Vol. XX— No. 2 



SEPTEMBER, 1957 



$1.00 Per Year 



Early Season Football Questions 



Editor's Note: These rulings do not set aside or modify any 
rule. Tiiey are interpretations on some of the early season 
situations which have been presented. 

Installment I 

1. Play. Al wears on his hand or aiin, a pad 
which contains fiber, sole leather or a stiff sheet 
of shaping- material or is in the nature of a metal 
finger stall. 

Ruling: Illegal. Player should not be allowed to 
participate until proper change has been made. 

2. Play: Al takes positon on end of line and 
then legally shifts to the backfield to leave former 
tackle A2 on end of line. If tackle has had a hand 
on the ground, may he move to a new position ? 

Ruling-: No. After having placed a restriction 
on himself as a tackle, such restriction continues to 
apply unless the team is called up for new signals. 

3. Play: After tackle Al and end A2 have taken 
a 3-point stance on the line, Bl moves laterally. Be- 
cause of this: (a) Al shifts; or (b) A2 shifts. 

Ruling: Illegal in (a). Legal in (b). 

4. Play: Tackle Al stands on line after which 
he puts hands on knees. He then drops to position 
with forearms on knees and finally to position with 
one or both hands on or near ground. Is this legal 
action? 

Ruling: Yes. Up to time Al places hand on or 
near ground, he may shift his body or move to an- 
other location. 

Comment: The rule has been written so the 
defensive player will have reasonable opportunity of 
detei-mining from any ang-le when the offensive in- 
terior linemen can no longer shift. A player's hand is 
considered near the ground if it is a few inches 
(approximately 3 or 4) above it. 

5. Play: Tackle Al and end A2 take a 3-point 
stance. A2 then shifts to a position in the backfield, 
leaving A2 on the end of the line. May Al then 
move to a new position ? 

Ruling: No. The restriction established when 
Al was in a tackle position continues. 

6. Play: After ball is ready-for-play, offensive 
tackle takes 3-point stance inadvertently in neutral 
zone. He moves slowly back to be legally on line. 
Is this a false start if B: (a) is; or (b) is not drawn 
into neutral zone ? 

Ruling: Not an infraction of the rule concei'n- 
ing interior linemen. It might be a false start for 
other reasons but if the obvious purpose is merely 
to move to correct position, it will be considered 
legal action. 

7. Play: A team charged with four time-outs 
in a half requests a time-out for injured Al. May 
A2 or Bl confer with his coach at the sideline. 

Ruling: If Al is removed, the time-out is not 
charged to anyone and it is not legal to confer. 

Comment. It is recommended that no player go 
to the sideline to confer until Referee has indicated 
time-out is to be charged to a team. Officials should 



indicate quickly to both captains whether or not 
time-out will be charg-ed to a team. 

8. Play: Coach of A desires to confer alternately 
with both Al and A2 during same charg-ed time-out 
or line and backfield coaches desire to confer alter- 
nately with Al during same charged time-out. 

Ruling: Illegal. 

9. Play: During a charged time-out: (a) coach 
of team A moves beyond the coaching box sideline 
to confer with one of his players; or (b) two coaches 
of team A confer with one or two players. 

Ruling: Foul in (a) and (b). 

10. Play: While goals are being changed be- 
tween first and second quarters, Al stops at his 
bench near the sideline to confer with his coach. 

Ruling: Foul. 

11. Play: Head coach of A goes on field to 
examine injured Al. Line coach confers with A2 at 
the sideline. As head coach comes off field, may he 
replace line coach in the conference? 

Ruling: No. Official is authorized to attempt to 
avoid foul by coach. 

12. Play: During charged time-out, Al starts 
toward sideline to confer with coach. Coach calls 
instructions to send A2. 

Ruling: Illeg-al. Determination of which player 
is to confer with the coach should be by field cap- 
tain or by other player designated by the coach in 
advance. The practice of calling any instructions 
from the sideline should be discouraged. Since the 
new rule allows considerable liberty in the way of 
conferences, all other restrictions on coaching from 
the sideline should be rigidly enforced. 

13. Play: A school administrator on the bench 
calls insti-uctions to his team. 

Ruling: Foul. Any person in a coaching box or 
on the coach's bench must abide by Rule 9-6 — Con- 
duct of Persons Other Than Players. 

14. Play: While a kick is in flight, Kl beyond 
the line interferes with Rl on R's 45 and K2 illegally 
pushes R2 on R's 35. 

Ruling: Multiple foul. R has choice of 15 yards 
at pi'e-vious spot or awarded fair catch. R may 
choose penalty for either foul or may decline both. 
R mig'ht take fair catch on his 45 or on his 35. 

16 Play: Substitute A2 replaces Al during a 
dead ball. Before the ball becomes alive, A3 enters 
for A2. 

Ruling: Foul. After administi-ation of penalty, 
A3 may remain in game. 

17. Play: At the snap, A7 simulates being an 
end and he is not on the line and he is less than 
1 yard behind it. 

Ruling: Loss of 5 for illegal position. If there is 
a foi-ward pass and A7 touches it before it is touched 
by a B player or if A7 advances beyond the neutral 
zone during the play and before the pass is touched, 

(Continued on Page Thirteen) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1957 



SEPTEMBER 1957 



VOL. XX— NO. 2 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (19B6-60), Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1957-61). Marion 

Directors— W. B. Jones (1957-61) Somerset: W. H. Crowdus 
(1954-58), Franklin; Jack Dawson (1954-58), Louisville; 
Robert P. Forsythe (1955-59), Greenville; K. G. Gillaspie 
(1955-59), Georgetown: Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



Jrom the Commissione'i s Dffl 



ice 



Basketball Clinics 



Charlie Vettiner, who has served the K.H.S.A.A. 
for many years as basketball clinic director, will be 
in charge of the 1957-58 rules meetings. Clinic at- 
tendance is required of all registered officials and 
head coaches under Association rules. 

The meetings are held primarily for the train- 
ing of officials, but much good will be accomplished 
when all officials and coaches attend the clinics and 
receive the same interpretations of the rules. The 
dates and sites of the m.eetings are as follows: 

September 29, Louisville City Jail, 7:30 P. M. 
(CDT) 

October 6, Elizabethtown High School, 1:30 
P. M. (CST) 

October 6, University High School, Lexington, 
8:00 P. M. (CDT) 

October 7, Somerset High School, 1:30 P. M. 
(CST) 

October 7, Bell High School, Pineville, 8:00 
P. M. (EST) 

October 8, Hazard High School, 1:30 P. M. 
(CST) 

October 8, Pikeville High School, 8:00 P. M. 
(EST) 

October 9, Morehead State College, 1:30 P. M. 
(CST) 

October 9, Ashland Y.M.C.A., 8:00 P. M. (EST) 

October 10, Newport High School, 7:30 P. M. 
(EST) 

October 14, Bowling Green High School, 7:30 
P. M. (CST) 

October 15, Mayfield High School, 1:30 P. M. 
(CST) 

October 15, Madisonville High School, 7:30 
P. M. (CST) 

October 16, Henderson High School, 1:30 P. M. 
(CST) 

October 16, Owensboro High School, 7:30 P. M. 
(CST) 

Use of Registered Officials 

The attention of principals and coaches is called 
to the lists of registered football and basketball of- 
ficials -wihich appear in this issue of the ATHLETE 



School men should study the current lists to deter- 
mine whether or not all officials with whom con- 
tracts have been signed have registered this fall. 
Supplementary lists of officials will appear in sub- 
sequent issues of the magazine. If there is any 
question about registration, the official should be 
asked to present his card. K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 22 
provides that member schools should use registered 
officials in all football and basketball games, and 
that failure to comply with this regulation makes 
the home school liable for suspension. 

Football Examinations 

Part II of the National Federation Football Ex- 
amination for Officials will be given in Kentucky 
on Monday, October 7. An official who has been 
registered for at least one year prior to the current 
season is eligible to take the examination and work 
for a higher rating. Officials who hold the "ap- 
proved" rating in football are required to make a 
minimum percentage gi-ade of 80 in order to main- 
tain this rating from year to year. Officials who 
hold the "certified" rating keep this rating by at- 
tending one or more clinics each year. Eligible of- 
ficials who wish to take the test should write the 
state office. 

Delegate Assembly 

Article IV, Section 2-b, of the K.H.S.A.A. Con- 
stitution provides that members to the Delegate 
Assembly at the annual meeting shall be elected by 
the principals of each basketball district on ballots 
distributed by the Commissioner before October 1 
and returned on or before November 15. Delegates 
serve for a period of one year, beginning January 1 
immediately following their election. 

KAHPER Fall Conference 

The Fall Conference of the Kentucky Associa- 
tion of Health, Physical Education, and Recreation 
will be held at Kentucky Dam Village on October 
11-13. For the first time this will be a cooperative 
workshop with the Kentucky Section of American 
Camping Association. Larry Eisenberg, famous 
in the field of social recreation, will be the key 
consultant. 

Basketball Tournament Trophies 

Specifications are now being written for the 
trophies which will be used in the 1957 district and 
regional basketball tournaments. Bids will be taken 
by the Trophy Committee during the next few 
weeks. Firms interested in submitting bids on the 
tournament trophies should write to the Commis- 
sioner for information. 

School for Officials 

The ninth annual School for Basketball Officials 
was held on Aug-ust 11-12 at the Phoenix Hotel, 
Lexington. The school was directed by Charlie 
Vettiner. 

The sixteen officials and the regions which 
they represented were: Rex Alexander, Region 1; 
Amos Teague, Region 2; Roy Settle, Region 3; 
Ben Topmiller, Region 4; James Jenkins, Region 5; 
Howard Gardner, Region 6; Dave Long-enecker, Reg- 
ion 7; Elmo Head, Region 8; Ralph Mussman, Reg- 
ion 9; Bennie Bridges, Region 10; Harry Stephen- 
son, Region 11; R. K. Padg-ett, Reg-ion 12; John 
Crosthwaite, Region 13; Arnett Strong, Region 14; 
Dick Looney, Region 15; Ernie Chattin, Region 16. 

In the first session of the school, held on the 
afternoon of Aug-ust 11, the agenda included the 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1957 



Page Three 



following: New Rules Changes, General Study of 
the Rules. In the evening session of the same day, 
the discussion centered around the following: Com- 
plete Study of the Rules, How to Call the Foul 
Lane Rule, How to Call the Dividing Line Rule. 

The morning session on August 12 was given 
to the study of the techniques of officiating in 
Kentucky. Among the items discussed were: Floor 
Technique on Jump Balls, Floor Technique on 
Fouls, Floor Technique on Field Goals. The after- 
noon session was devoted to the matter of fixing 
responsibilities in "charging" and "blocking" fouls. 
Special emphasis was given to determining the pri- 
mary responsibility on stationary and moving- 
screens, and offensive and defensive fouling. 

The school was attended by Associate Secretary 
Cliff Fagan, of the National' Federation of State 
High School Athletic Associations, who discussed 
various phases of officiating and rules interpreta- 
tions during the meeting. Commissioner Sanford of- 
fered a number of suggestions to officials as to the 
meithod in which they may best serve the officials 
and schools in their respective regions. 

New Football Film 

The enthusiastic reception which was given the 
film "Football For Millions" at its preview showing 
during the National Federation Annual Meeting at 
Miami Beach, Florida, indicates that it will be 
widely used during the 1957 Football season. This 
is the latest of the Wilson-Wheaties series which 
is sponsored by Wilson and General Mills. 

The growth in number of viewers of these films 
has been phenomenal. Their primary purpose has 
been to supplement the rules training pro- 
grams as sponsored by the member State High 
School Associations. An important secondary pur- 
pose has been to increase rules knowledge and to 
encourage appreciation for good game administra- 
tion. The films have been widely used in school 
assemblies, boys' clubs and service clubs as well as 
in school athletic departments where coaches have 
a pride in the attitude which is engendered among 
all squad members for the sport which is currently 
in season. Sports administration courses in the col- 
leges have included a study of the films. An even 
wider use is in television programs where short 
films are often used to maintain interest. For such 
use, the television station is permitted to delete all 
advertising provided the deleted film strip is re- 
placed before the film is returned. In nearly all 
cases, television stations have decided that the ad- 
vertising material is of such a nature that it is an 
integral part of the film and no deletions have been 
made. 

The number of leased prints of this new film 
establishes a new record. While the greater pi-opor- 
tion of the leases are to State High School Associa- 
tions, a considerable number are to teacher col- 
leges, service clubs and conferences. In some cases, 
a conference of half a dozen high schools or col- 
leges leases a print to service the members of the 
conference. This is also done for service clubs in a 
given area. In all such cases, the approval of the 
State High School Association is secured before 
any film is leased for showing in the given state. 

The graphic way in which the football scenes 
are shown and the humor which provides continuity 
are of such a nature as to wai'rant the prediction 
that this will be one of the most popular of the 
film sei'ies. 



National Federation Annual 
Meeting 

The thirty-eighth annual meeting of the 
National Federation of State High School 
Athletic Associations was held at the Bal- 
moral Hotel, Miami Beach, Florida, on June 
26-29, 1957. Forty-four state associations, 
along with affiliated associations in Alaska, 
Ontario, Canada, and Hawaii were represent- 
ed. In addition representatives from the 
Texas and Washington, D. C. associations 
were in attendance. Sixty-two state executive 
officers or assistant executive officers, fifty- 
five state association board of control of- 
ficers, and eighty-four additional board of 
control members attended. The National 
Association of Intercollegiate Athletics was 
also represented. The total individual attend- 
ance was 588. This represents a new record 
for total attendance. 

Kentucky was represented by K.H.S.A.A. 
President Russell Williamson ; Vice-President 
Louis Litchfield ; Directors W. H. Crowdus, 
Jack Dawson, Robert P. Forsythe, K. G. 
Gillaspie, W. B. Jones, and Cecil A. Thornton; 
Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford ; and Assist- 
ant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield. 

The Hawaii High School Athletic Associa- 
tion was officially accepted as an affiliated 
member of the National Federation. Secre- 
tary Alvin Chanig, Executive Officer of the 
newly-formed Association was present and 
participated in the program. Mr. Chang is 
also Director of Physical Education and Ath- 
letics for the territory. Alaska was represent- 
ed by President-elect J. E. McCarthy. Canada 
was represented by Gerald Allen and Ford W. 
Auburn of Toronto, Ontario. The meeting 
was the occasion for introducing several Ex- 
ecutive Officers who have recently taken 
office or who, for some reason, had not been 
initiated into the ranks of State Executive 
Officers. William C. Pace is the new Execu- 
tive Officer of the Virginia High School 
League. He replaces H. R. Richardson, who 
has accepted a highly responsible position as 
county supervisor of Fairfax County, Vir- 
ginia. This county includes many of the 
large suburbs of Washington, D. C. During 
the meeting, Mr. Richardson was cited for 
outstanding services and the entire Federa- 
tion group hopes that he will find happiness 
and satisfaction in his new field. Irvin A. 
Keller of Columbia, Missouri, and John E. 
Roberts of Marinette, Wisconsin are the 
newly-elected Executive Secretaries of their 
respective states. Delmer Marshall of Berke- 
(Continued on Page Ten) 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1957 



The Flying Dutchman 

When the National Federation of High 
School Athletic Associations sent Cliff Fagan 
to the Kentucky High School Athletic As- 
sociation's ninth annual School for Basket- 
ball Officials in Lexington, a lot was added 
to the value of this program. Cliff, who is 
a former commissioner of high school ath- 
letics in Wisconsin and is now working with 
H. V. Porter in the Federation offices in 
Chicago, did a complete job of selling him- 
self to Kentucky's officials. The arbiters im- 
mediately liked him. He won their respect 
and confidence and made us all feel we had 
known him all our lives. 

So much did Cliff Fagan contribute to 
the sessions this year, that it was a unani- 
mous agi'eement that this group recommend 
him for the first Corn Cob Pipe of Honor 
Award for 1957-58. Already, the Kentucky 
Racehorse with the Cob Pipe adorning its 
neck is in Cliff's office. 

Shelbyville's Elmo Head came up with 
another recommendation for the Cob Pipe 
Award when he named Jane Meyer, of his 
city, for the honor. In the line of unselfish 
service, Jane Meyer qualified because she 
has been a constant supporter of Shelby- 
ville's athletic program besides sponsoring 
and chaperoning the cheerleaders for the 
past ten years. 

This very popular lady takes the cheer- 
leaders to all the games in her own car ; gives 
the annual athletic banquet, which she has 
done for the past ten years ; gives gold balls 
to seniors in all sports ; awards an annual 
sportsmanship trophy to the outstanding 
senior boy and girl; helps all kids, not just 
athletes ; and she recently purchased cheer- 
leader jackets to be used on trips. Small won- 
der that the Corn Cob Pipe is on its way to 
this widely known Kentucky horsewoman 
who owns and operates the beautiful Undu- 
lata Farm. 

There are some orchids to be passed out 
to the management of the All-Star Games. 
They were as well done as this writer has 
ever seen anywhere. Commissioner Ted and 
Assistant Commissioner Joe Billy get some 
for the administration of the best training 
school for officials we have ever had. Noth- 
ing was left undone to make the officials 
comfortable and to send them away feeling 
that the Kentucky High School Athletic As- 
sociation is personally interested in the ath- 
letic welfare of all of the communities and 
the individuals associated with athletics. 




The Dutchman 

You know, it's not all study and work in 
the School for Officials, because most of the 
fellows bring along their golf clubs and get 
in as many holes as they can between ses- 
sions. So it was that the wee small hours of 
the morning found the Dutchman joining 
such experts as Dave Longenecker, of Louis- 
ville ; Roy Settle, Owensboro ; Rex Alexander, 
Murray ; and "Dapper John" Gettler, of Lex- 
ington, on the course. Unless you shoot top- 
flight golf, you don't want to "mess" with 
fellows like Dave, Roy, and Rex. They can 
pin about anybody's ears back on the golf 
course. Imagine what a picture the Dutch- 
man's 93 made alongside Longenecker's 77, 
Settle's 78, and Alexander's 79. Gettler kept 
me company with 92! 

It is a certainty that the School received 
added impetus this year from newcomers 
Jimmy Jenkins, of Bowling Green; Dave 
Longenecker, of Louisville ; and Ralph Muss- 
man, of Newport. It's funny, whenever we 
think of these three fellows, we think of 
Jimmy as "the brains," Ralph as "the per- 
sonahty," and Longenecker as "the courage." 
In Bowling Green, they'll tell you that Jimmy 
Jenkins is just plain sharp, and in Newport, 
City Manager Ralph Mussman is loved by 
everyone, including those whom he penalizes 
for being bad boys, while the courage of 
Dave Longenecker is a story in itself. 

About Dave — claiming Ohio State as his 
Alma Mater and having coached in Colum- 
bus, Ohio, it was a happy day for Kentucky 
when Dave brought his bride here. Immed- 
iately, he established an enviable officiating 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1957 



Page Five 



record, being in demand far and wide, and 
then came misfortune. On a trip into Ohio, 
an unfortunate accident put Dave and his 
wife in the hospital, with Mrs. Longenecker 
being in a full body cast for months. Neither 
gave up, and some time later Dave was out, 
but Ann was still wearing a cast. While Ann 
was still in the hospital miles away, Dave 
was stricken with a heart attack and all the 
doctors gave him up. In her cast, Ann was 
rushed to Dave at the time when all hope 
seemed gone, but this chap refused to quit 
living. 

More frustration was in store. Dave re- 
covered and was elected to work the State 
Tournament, the aim of all officials, but his 
doctor said, "No, you can never be very ac- 
tive physicaly again." And yet, this same 
CQiurageous chap officiates regularly and 
feels better because he does, shoots sub-par 
golf, and is one of Kentucky's finest leaders. 
Much of the ci'edit for his remarkable come- 
back has to go to charming Mrs. Ann Longe- 
necker. 

The big things scheduled in the near fu- 
ture are the Kentucky High School Basket- 
ball Clinics. All coaches are reminded that 
this year there is a requirement that they 
must be in attendance. So it is that we are 
looking for much larger crowds, and anti- 
cipating that these meetings will be of great 
value in bringing about friendlier relations 
between the coaching and officiating fratern- 
ities. 

Many spectators and even some coaches 
will agree that scheduling the Louisville of- 
ficials' clinic at the City Jail is an appro- 
priate move. These men already wear striped 
shirts. Be that as it may, the new and modern 
meeting room of Louisville's new City Jail 
will have the arbiters right where a lot of 
people have always suggested that they be 
put, only the door will not be locked ! For 
the date and the place your clinic is sche- 
duled, check elsewhere in this issue of the 
ATHLETE. 

Remember that the three aims of The Fly- 
ing Dutchman are: 1) To recognize people 
rendering unselfish service to others through 
the Corn Cob Pipe of Honor Award; 2) To 
find all of the Game Guys of Kentucky who 
are overcoming physical handicaps to play 
normally like other youngsters; and 3) To 
honor communities going beyond the call of 
duty to be good neighbors to the communities 
visiting them when Kentucky teams com- 
pete in sports. 

Let's have your recommendations! 



Registered Football Officials 

of The K. H. S. A. A.— 1957 

(List Compiled September 1) 

If one telephone numoer is given tor an official listed, it 
is the home piione unless otherwise desiernated. If two nuunioers 
are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Adams, Mark, 26U4 (Jumoeriand Ave., Ashland, East 4-5864, 

i.ast 4-l)«i:u 
Allmon, Eaymond i'., 108 Arta Dr., Madison, Tenn. 7-6076 
Alston, E. Ueedom, 1016 8. 4-ird., Louisville, Sp 2-1092, Ju 7-6129 
Anderson, E. W., Jr., 504 Wignland, Mayfield, 1927, 71 
Autore, Daniel, Box 172, Wheelwright, 2362 
Baird, Daniel M., ai:! Main St., Fulton, 1550, 100 
Ballard, Robert A., R. K. 3, Shelbyville, 1490, 152 
Bach, Leonard. 3137 N. Bend Rd., Cincinnati, Ohio, Mu 1-1515, 

MU 1-1515 
Barbour, Morris, 440 Wilberforce Ct.. Louisville 3 
Barlow, Bob, Highland Ave., Georgetown, 894 
Barlow, Bill, Lynnwood Dr., R. R. 5, Paris, 1095 W, Lexing- 
ton 2-2220. Ext. 2262 
Barlow, James L., 282 S. Ashland, Lexington, 4-9287, 2-5858 
Bartels, John, 423 3rd., Dayton, Ju 1-4260, He 1-9088 
Baskin, Sylvester, 214 W. St., Lynch, Vi 8-5637 
Bell, Clarence T., 1228 S. 41st St., Louisville 11, Sp 8-7792, 

Ju 2-1696 
Bell. Thomas P., 1843 Glennhill Dr., Lexington, 2-2958, 2-1477 
Bennett, Howard, R. R. 4, Mayfield, 1754 J. 1420 
Blanton, Homer, 711 Bellefonte, Princess Rd., Ashland, East 

4-1730 
Boeing, F. Charles, 3959 Delmar Ave., Cincinnati 11, Ohio, 

Mo 1-7032, Mv 1-6300 
Bohanon, J. B., 2226 Madison, Paducah, 2-8149, 2-1652 
Bonner, John C, 5335 Buckner Ave., Louisville, Em 7-1741, 

Ext. 51 (Bus. No. I 
Bostick, Lord M., Jr., 419 W. 12th St., Bowling Green, Vi 3-3319 
Bowling, Harry, Hodgenville, El 8316, El 8-3231 
Bowman, Earl G. "Dick", 689 Mt. Vernon Dr., Lexington, 

5-0473, 2-3343 
Bowman. George H., 3821 Mantel, Cincinnati, Ohio, Tw 1-2747, 

Re 1-9990 
Boyles, Jerry F., 3200 Park St., Ashland, East 4-6995, East 

4-111, E.xt. 229 
Bozarth, Frank, 6020 Athens Dr., Louisville 13, O.K. 9-3019 
Brandenburg. Donald E., 605 Winchester Ave., Middlesboro, 

Brichler, Joe A., 5737 Kiefer Ct., Cincinnati, Ohio, Ki 1-6049. 

Pa. 1-1984 
Brizendine, Vic, 2711 Lakeside Dr., Louisville 5, GL 4-6843, 

JU 7-9111 
Broderick. Carroll A.. P. O. Box 346, Bowling Green, 

2-5636, 3-8212 
Brotzge, Maurice, 3800 W. Broadway, Louisville, Sp 6-2606, 

Sp 6-2506 
Brown, George W., 1726 Quarry Hill Rd., Louisville, Gl 8-4857, 

.Tu 4-1361, Ext. 462 
Burke, Daniel F., 1115 Maureen Ln., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

Gr 1-9631, Ma 1-7411 
Byrd, Harry G., 7331 N. Timberlane Dr., Madeira, Ohio, 

Lo 1-8745, Wo 1-7534 
Caiman. Edwin C, .Fr., 1124 Washington, Sturgis, 3900. 3545 
Campbell, John J., Country Club Courts. Fulton, 1773, 14 
Canter, John, 1809 Shady Lane, Apt. 3, Louisville, Hi 7281-M, 

Ju 7-8862 
Carlson, David A., 2916 Washington St., Paducah. 5-7943 
Carroll, Thomas J., 1725 Devon Dale Dr., Louisville, Tw 5-8478 

Em 3-.3.582 
Caruso, J. T.. 123 Oak. Norton, Va., 154, 410 
Cathey, Gene S., 1415 Vine, Murray, 1179-M, Id 6-3221 
Cawood, Hobart Guy, 2016V. Cumb. Ave., Middlesboro, 729, 365 
Cecil, A. Morris. 14 Shaw Lane, Ft. Thomas, Hi 1-8427, 

Ch 1-2582 
Clagg. Harry G., 1336 13th St., Huntington, W. Va. 
Clark, Harold B., E.K.S.C. CPO Box 121. Richmond 
Clinard, Fred L., Snow Ave., Madison, Tenn., Al 6-7235, 

44-7-2437 
Coleman L J. "Duke", Jr.. 115 Arcadia Pk., Lexington, 

5-1400, 5-1400 
Combs, Travis, 610 N. Main. Somerset, 1239, 143 
Coulter, William, 807 Taylor, Evansville, Ind., H. A. 3-7510, 

H. A. 4-4915 
Cox, William J. (Bill). 528 Tenn. Ave., Pineville, Edgewood 

7-3290, Edgewood 9131 
Grace, James, 3354 Court St., Catlettsburg, 218 
Craig, Randy, 4676 Delhi Rd., Cincinnati 38. Ohio, Bl 1-1650, 

Ga 1-4460 
Craft, Wm. N., Jr., 638 Longview Dr.. Lexington, 4-2361, 

5-0160 
Crosthwaite, .Tohn S., Jr., Box 589, Harlan, 2075. 57 
Crum. Edward E., 3242 Greendale Dr., Louisville, Sp 8-6067 
Gulp, Capt. Willard E., Co. A, 326th Eng. Br., Ft. Campbell, 

4307, 2971 
Cummins, Joshua H., 2139 Memorial PkV.. Ft Thomas, Hi 

1-1679, Po 4100, Ext. 1401 
Current, Ray, 670 Springridge Dr., Lexington, 2-0382. 5-4660 
Dallmann, James W., 12 Center St., Jeffersonville, Indiana, 

Butler 3-7255 
Davis, Clyde E„ 2531 E. Euclid, Ashland, East 4-7804, 5-7151 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1957 



Demuth, Paul E., 2242 Thistle Dawn Dr., Louisville, Em 6-4354, 

Ju 7-0719 
Derrington, Robert, R. R. 9, New Harmony Rd., Evansville, 

Ind., Wo 3-5133, Ha 4-6441 
DiMuzio, Robert M., 6422 Golfway Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

Ki 1-2220, Wa 1-llSU 
Dixon, Charles 'i'., 101 Humston Dr., Lawrenceburg, 9-4080, 

Dolan, Richard Sherl, 5111 Emerald Dr., Louisville 19, 21-9-7239, 
Jeffersonville, Ind., Bu 3-6611 - Adv. Dept. 

Doll, Howard D., V. A. Hospital, Ft. Thomas, Hi 1-8200, 
Hi 1-8341 

Dotson, W. S., 432 E. 5th St., Lexington, 2-6131, 4-0350 

Duke, Jesse W., Jr., 8422 Staghorn, Louisville, T\, 6-7321, 

Durkin, Jack H., 240 Hillsboro, Lexington, 4-4396, 4-1717 
Edelen, Ben E., 3309 Wellingmoor, Louisville. Gl 4-3518 
Ellspermann, George, 1305 S. Ruston, Evansville, Ind., Gr 

6-5693, Ha 4-7741, Ext. 607 
Elovitz, Carl, 1920 Spring Grove Ave., Lexington, 5-1222, 

Vers. 720 
Engle, Orville, 128 Oak St., Pineville, 7-2916 
Ernst, Ray C, 3674 Larkspur Ave., Cincinnati 8, Ohio, East 

1-6768, Ch 1-5820, Line 697 
Ewing, C. M., 7409 U. S. 42, Florence. At 3-3147, Walton 93 
Falls, Wm. M., 122 Liberty St., Hopkinsville 
Faust, John F., 2427 Concord Dr., Louisville, Me 7-2043, 

Ju 7-7444 
Ferrell, Doc, 541 Hill-n-Dale, Lexington, 4-1851, 4-0301 
Figg, Charles R., Navaho Trail, Frankfort, CA 7-2146, CA 3-0565 
Fisher, William B., Jr., 1722 Beechview Ct., Louisville 16, 

Emerson 6-6488, 21-7-1431 
Fitchko, Bill, 918 Park Ave., Norton, Va., 466-W, 554 
Fletcher, John L., 122-1 Gaffey Hgts., Ft. Knox, Rt 3-2742, 

2052 
Florence, Robert H., 2722 Trimble St., Paducah, 5-7489, 6-6311, 

Ext. 676 
Forbes, John W., Jr., 208 Granvil Dr., Louisville, Gl 4-6025, 

Sp 8-2731 
Forsythe, Robert, 113 Chestnut, Greenville, 949, 474 
Fortney, Robert Lee, 2817 Breckenridge Ln., Louisville, Gl 

8-1079, Ju 2-3511, Ext. 474 
Foster, Berryman, 927 Waverly Dr., Lexington, 3-1827, 2-0515 
Freese, Oliver T., 6661 Meadowridge Ln., Cincinnati 37, Ohio, 

El 1-4791, Me 1-2295 
Freihaut, Herman, 2601 Heidelbach, Evansville, Ind., Ha 

5-6155, Ha 2-1774 
Funkhouser, Roy A., Bldg. 432 A., Ft. Campbell, 3257, 2128 
Gammon, Wm. H., 908 Highland, Ashland, Ea 4-6519, Ea 4-1111 
Gettler, John F., 705 Providence Rd., Lexington, 2-8845, 2-5494 
Giles, Jonathan W., 3404 Greenwood, Louisville, Sp 8-1976, 

Ju 4-6183 
Gish, Delmas, 204 W. 3rd St., Central City. 518W, 9 
Godbey, Edsel T., 662 Maxwelton Ct., Lexington, 6-0986 
Grace, Chas. K., Cypress St., Pineville, Ed 7-3331, Ed 7-2392 
Grady, Clarence, 430 N. Main, Marion, 95, 60 
Greene, Omar Paul, 1806 Scott St., Covington, Juniper 1-1706 
Greenslait, James W., Brown St., Raceland, 4-2156, Ext. 219, 

(Bus. No.) 
Grieco, Joseph R., 2832 Shaffer Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, Mon- 
tana 1-3346 
Gruneisen, Sam, 1101 Samuel St., Louisville, Me 4-9964, Ju 

7-6656 
Hacker, Henry, 1605 Laura, Clearwater, Fla. 
Hadden, Newell P., Jr., 942 Wolf Run Rd., Lexington, 6-6332, 

2-7866 
Haffey, Stan. 1243 Garden Circle, Cincinnati, Ohio, PO 1-2884, 

PO 1-2884 
Hagan, Joseph E., 3000 Sherbrooke Ed., Louisville Gl 8-1325 
Hagerman, Bart, 715 Magnolia Ave., Bowling Green, Vi 2-7865, 

Vi 2-2481 
Hale, H. Ed.. 288 Hillsboro, Lexington, 4-0017 
Hall, Frank P., 2828 Clay, Paducah, 2-3073, 2-1627 
Hanes. Edward C, 1508 Ridgecrest, Bowling Green 
Harris, Gene, 201 Riverside Dr., Russell, 822, Ashland Ea 

4-1155. Ext. 253 
Harrod, Eobert, 129 Camden Ave., Versailles. 710 (Bus. No.) 
Hartley. Wm. E., 1121 Marshall Ave., Evansville, Ind., Gr 

7-0631, Gr 7-0631 
Hatfield. Gene Edwin, 202 Taylor, Fulton, 1274. Union City, 

Tenn. 708 
Harkins, Ealph B.. 661 E. Broadway, Madisonville, 2927, 210 
Hawkins, Robert W.. Echo Ln.. Madisonville, 2722, 163 
Heinold, Jack, 3642 Wilshire, Cincinnati, Ohio, Ea. 1-9263, 

Ma 1-1901 
Heinze, Frank, 204 Maple Ave.. Prestonsburs, 2436 
Heinze, John G., 206 N. Arnold Ave., Prestonsburg, 2195. 2195 
Hellard, George D., Jr., 572 Longview Dr., Lexington, 3-0871, 

3-0484 
Herndon. Alton E.. 424 College. Paducah, 2-1153 
Hewline. Richard, 211 Linden. Newport. Ax 1-2299, Me 1-0010 
Hoferer, Louis R., 420 McClelland, Cincinnati 17, Ohio, 

Ca 1-3022, Wa 1-9841 
Holbrook, Wm.. 2421 Forest Ave.. Ashland, Ea 4-5850, Ea 4-2144 
Holeman. D. Fletcher, 329 Poplar St., Dawson Springs. 2302, 

4241 
Holman, S. T.. 3 Gilliam, Corbin, 1742-M. 283 
Howerton. Jack, .Tr., 416 Lotis Way, Louisville, Tw 3-7490, 

.Tu 7-6002 
Huff, Carl R., 1017 W. Delaware, Evansville, Ind., Ha 2-7234 



Janning, Robert L., 151 Pleasant Ridge Ave.. Ft. Mitchell, 

Ed 1-3538, Ki 1-2142 
Jarboe, Clem E., 321 Concord Blvd., Evansville. Ind., Ha 4-1965, 

Ha 3-4435 
Jenkins, Kean, 210 Morningside, Elizabethtown, EO-5-4087, 

EO-5-4087 
Jeter, John B., 1702 Versailles Rd., Lexington, 4-9935 
Johnson, Bernard, 322 Blueberry Ln., Lexington, 4-7722, 2-2200, 

Ext. 2324 
Johnson, James M., Box 367, Jenkins, 64-J 
Jones, James Carl, 1003 S. Ky. St., Corbin, 1820, 42 
Kathman, Bernie, 3060 Elmwood Dr., Edgewood, S. Ft. Mitchell, 

Di 1-7369, Ma 1-7541 
Kauth, Donald F., 2122 Ky. Ave., Paducah, 2-1208 
Kemper, Russ, 5732 Lauderdale Dr., Cincinnati 24, Ohio, We 

1-6222, Ma 1-4380 
King, Allen, 424 N. Brady, Morganfield, 623W, 2 or 3 
Kraesig, Charles F., 3851 C Fincastle, Louisville. Gh 8-4969 
Kraesig, Ray, 927 Ardmore, Louisville, Me 4-9366 
Kyle, Leslie G., Jr., 25 Chalfonte PL, Ft. Thomas, Hi 1-8601, 

Ki 1-2642 
Lancaster, Morris B., 106 Penmoken Pk., Lexington, 2-6692, 

4-3644 
Lawson, Carl E., Ivy Hill, Harlan, 1327. 1646 
Lawson, Leland, 949 Deporres, Lexington, 4-1009 
Lenahan, Thomas F., 3107 Doreen Way, Louisville, Gl 8-4490, 

Ju 4-9083 
Levicki, A. P., 340 Oak, Norton, Va.. 656, 664 
Longenecker, David M.. 3910 Olympic. Louisville, Tw 6-9071, 

Tw 5-3401, E.xt. 301-2 
Lowe, Eugene T., 107 Ford. London. 157-R, 527 
Lucas, Gene T., 412 Clayton Ave., Georgetown, 1371, 19 
Ludwig, Harry F., Lou. Country Day School, Louisville 7, 

Be 5380, Be 3452 
McClaskey, Booker, Boston, Te 3-4725, Ft. Knox 4916 
McCollum, Eobert G., 406 Holiday Rd., Lexington, 2-3710 
McCowan, Connell, R. E. 1, Box 261, Corbin, 2361 
McKown, C. H., Wayne. W. Va. 

McTigue, Joe, 647 Eastlawn, Louisville, Sp 6-6120, Me 7-8726-7 
Makepeace, Wm. H., Jr., 2346 E. Hill Ave.. Cincinnati, Ohio, 

East 1-4042 
Martin, Bill. 153 Clay St., Erlanger, Di 1-8472 
Matarazzo, Salvatore M., 320 N. Mulberry, Elizabethtown, 

EG 6-6689 
May, E. B., Jr., Box 185, Prestonsburg, 2314, 7661 
Mayhew, Happy, Barbourville. 619 L 

Mayo. Henry L.. Jr., 581 College, Paintsville. 856, 29 & 30 
Meeks, Jack F., 407 5th St., Corbin, 415. 561 
Mercke, Frank, 417 Lotis Way, Louisville, Tw 6-8460, Ju 5-4206 
Meyer, Bud, 5319 Lilibet Ct., Cincinnati, Ohio, Bl 1-3469, 

Du 1-5411 
Millerhaus. Bill, 923 Harris Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, Gr 1-7904, 

Wa 1-9722 
Mitchell, Emmett. 284 Taylor Dr., Lexington. 6-2480, 4-4255 
Mitchell, Vyron W.. 901 Walnut, Fulton, 1648, 30 
Moellering, Louis H., 6287 Lilburle, Cincinnati 30, Ohio, Be 

1-8701, Mu 1-3510 
Monahan. Wm. G., 103 Oaklawn Dr., Frankfort, Ca 3-3352, 

Ca 7-2231, Ext. 312 
Monroe, Robert W.. 601 W. Poplar, Elizabethtown, RO 5-4900, 

RO 5-6151 
Moran, W. C, 3104 Horton Ave., Louisville 5, Gl 8-6178 

Sp 2-3661 
Mordica, Wm. A., 800 Edgewood Ave., Ashland, East 4-7741 
Moss, Howard A.. P. O. Box 1042. Paducah. 3-1072, 2-4474 
Mullins. B. E., Paintsville, 432, 545 
Muntan. Peter J., 125 Woodmore Ave., Louisville, Em 8-8236, 

Me 7-7621, Ext. 288 
Mussman. Ralph. Jr., 602 Monroe. Newport, Ju 1-4562, Co 1-1300 
Nau, Bill, Barbourville, 203, 317 

Neal, Gene, 549 Washington, New Richmond. Ohio, RI 2-3641 
Neverstitch, Johnny. Benham, 6408 

Newman, Chas., 63A Rose Terrace. Ft. Knox. 2060 (Bus. No.) 
Nimmo, Lo, Beechmont Ave., c/o Gen'l Protestant Orphan 

Home, Cincinnati 30, Ohio, Beechmont 1-6630 (Bus. No.) 
Noland. Douglas. 707 E. Main. Stanford. 2609. 2619 
Nord, Ed, 1734 S. 23rd, Louisville, Sp 4-1968, Tw 6-3401, 

Ext. 202 
Omer, Billy W., R. E. 5. Madisonville, Taylor 1-2833 
O'Nan, Norman. E. E. 3. Henderson. 7-3465. 7-9912 
O'Neal, Bud, 1767 Harvard Dr., Louisville. Hi 6388. Me 7-6494 
Osborne, Ted G., 408 Henry Clay. Lexington, 4-6270 
Overby, H. E., 1913 11th Ave., N. Nashville. Tenn., Al 6-1310, 

AI 6-4742, Al 4-8364. Sta. 12 
Palmer, Carl A., Ironton, Ohio. 4171 

Parker, Billie E., P. O. Box 731. Pineville. Edgewood 7-3293 
Parsley, Clyde E., E. E. 2, Providence. Mo 7-2624 
Patrick, Chas. C. E. E. 2, Lexington, 4-4516 
Pearce, H. L.. 2324 Broadmeade, Louisville 5, Sp 4-2341, 

Gl 8-3845 
Perdue, Paul. 623 Broad, Murrav, 1018-J, 298 
Perkins, Billy, R. R. 1, Georgetown, 438 
Perry. A. L., 321 Meadow Ln., Elizabethtown, EO 5-7735, 

Ft. Knox 2149 or 2140 
Perry, L. J., 438 South. Lynch. Vi 8-5941 
Pinson. Eugene, 3208, Ashland, EA 4-6548. EA 4-3101 
Poore, Wm. E.. Box 116. Somerset. 1313 (Bus. No.) 
Radjunas. Stan E.. 1644 Elliott Ave., Ashland, East 4-1896, 

East 4-1896 
Raines, Max, 229 Eebecca Ln., Clarksville, Tenn., Ft. Camp- 
bell 2144 (Bus. No.) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1957 



Page Seven 



Keddington, James, 2539 Ridgewood, Louisville, Me 7-7964 
Reed, Gordon, 1603 N. Ft. Thomsa Ave., Ft. Thomas, Hi 1-4946, 

Du 1-4507 
Reinhart, Gene, 4813 Sweetzer, Evansville, Ind., Gr. 7-3919, 

Ha 4-7741, Ext. 565 
Renfro, .lohn Edwin, Pikeville College, Pikeville, 1456R, 9102 
Riddle, J. B., 840 12th Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Riddle, Maurice G., R. R. 1, Georgetown. 661M2, 2-2220, 

Ext. 2238 
Rigas, Wm. T., 28 Congress Dr., Morganfield, 690, 9168 
Robbins, Robert A., 400 Culpepper, Ijexington, 2-2148 
Rocke, James M., 10 Lewis Circle, Erlanger, Di 1-9082, Ax 

1-2523 
Rogers, Harry, 76 Blade Ave., Frankfort, 3-8236, 7-4611 
Rogers, J. B., 840 12th Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 
Rolph, Harold J., 915 S. 7th St., Ironton. Ohio. 2059 R, 1390 
Rudolph, Fred, Jr., 1020 Parkway Dr., Louisville, ME 4-0737, 

ME 6-7441 
Russell, Charles B., Box 627. Lynch, Viking 8-2301 
Russell, Joe, Box 11, Russellville, Pa 6-6983. Pa 6-6983 
Sabato, Al, 7621 View Place Dr., Cincinnati 24, Ohio, Va 

1-3646, Pa 1-1062 
Sacra, Gresham, 920 Darley Dr., Lexington, 2-6036, 2-2220, 

Ext. 3217 
Sauter Harold S., 1227 Crown Ave., Louisville 4, Highland 

6512J, Emerson 8-3381, Ext. 271 
Saylor, Ben H., 312 Von Dorn, Corbin, 2187 
Saylor, Deward, Wallins Creek. Morris 4-3694 
Scharfenberger, Irvin T., 7267 Jethve Ln., Madeira, Ohio, 

Lo 1-6378, Lo 1-6378 
Schmitt, K. F., 636 S. 40th, Louisville, Sp 2-0131, Ju 4-8269 
Schultz, Edward "Jake," 6910 Gloria Dr., Cincinnati 39, Ohio, 

Ja 1-6665, Ch 1-1960 
Schuhmann, Jos. R.. Altawood, Anchorage 21-6088. Ju 7-7341 
Scott, Bill, 1816 McDonald, Lexington, 2-3316, 4-3662 
Scullen, Allan R., School Troops, Ft. Knox, 6998 
Seale, Frank E., 1001 Tates Creek Rd., Lexington, 6-6028 
Selvy, Curt, Corbin, 1333 

Shackelford. Dallas E.. 1107 S. 1st. Union City, Tenn., 144, 144 
Shaw, John H.. 219 E. Lee St., Mayfield, 1436 
Shaw, Paul, 1709 Hawthorne, Lexington, 2-1803 
Shaw, Stanley E., 4460 W. 8th St., Cincinnati 38, Ohio, 

Gr 1-1100, Mu 1-3610 
Showalter, John, Georgetown, 662 

Sloan, Earl Dean, 108 Diane Ct., Madison, Tenn., 7-6316 
Sloan, Wallace, 419 Oread Rd.. Louisville, Tw 6-1126, Tw 7-2664 
Smith, Edgar. J., 3904 Farmview Ave., Louisville 18, GI 8-1286, 

Em 6-8745 
Smith, Walter K., 1709 Harvard Dr., Louisville, Ju 7-9201 

(Bus. No.) 
Snider, Louis G., 2103 Debera Way, Louisville 18, Gl 8-5248, 

Gl 4-7511, Ext. 
Stephenson, Burkitt H., 331 Taylor Dr., Lexington, 2-7970 

(Bus. No.) 
Stephenson, Harry S., Transylvania College, Lexington, 4-9620, 

4-2431 
Stevens, Paul B., 633 Hospital Rd.. Dawson Springs, 2006, 3811 
Stevens, Wm. Darrell. 418 Culpepper Rd., Lexington, 6-1071, 

2-2220, Ext. 3122 
Sullivan, Don C, 523 Riverside Dr., Prestonsburg, 4791, 2530 
Teague, Amos, Chickasaw Dr., Madisonville, TA 1-4639 
Thompson. Jack, 2347 Saratoga Dr.. Louisville, Hi 4183 
Thompson. Jack, 1310 Rammers St.. Louisville, Me 4-3617, 

Ju 4-5311 
Thompson, Paul, 2624 Blackburn Ave., Ashland 
Thompson, Ralph, 649 Ivy Hill, Cincinnati, Ohio, BI 1-3394, 

Wa 1-0047 
Thurman, J. W., 108 Town So., Manchester, 2281, 2811 
Timmering, George E., 1741 Boiling, Louisville 
Treas. Joe W.. 609 Green, Fulton. 1056, 41 
Tucker, William R., 27 Lisle Ln., Winchester. 2143 
Vance, Wendell, 27 Whirlaway, Lyndon, Tw 5-6618. Ch 5-4121 
Van Meter, John W., Jr.. 1933 Olive, Louisville, Sp 8-6032, 

.Tu 7-6656 
Vankirk. Alvia S., 107 S. Poplar, Corbin, 1646 
Varner, Ray G.. 1002 Birch Dr., Lexington, 2-5432. 6-4224, 

Ext. 210 
Wade, Bill. Dewey Ct.. Frankfort 
Walker, Paul R., 224 S. Mulberry St., Elizabethtown, RO 

5-4524, RO 6-4604 
Waldrop, Douglas, Park City, SH 9-2196 

Walter. Lafayette, 55th St., Ashland, East 4-7661, East 4-6191 
Wanchic, Nicholas. 505 Holly Hill Dr.. Lexington, 3-2880, 

Ext 318 (Bus. No.) 
Wash, Johnnie. 1806 Beacon Hill, Lexington, 5-2474, 3-0484 
Welch, Bill, 1324 Beech, Cincinnati 5, Ohio. Gr 1-8090, Pa 1-8578 
Welch, Tom, 3932 Vine Vista PI., Cincinnati 17, Ohio, Av 

1-8094, Ga 1-5700, Ext. 371 
Wells, Milford, Prestonsburg, 6101. 7731 
Whedbee, Melville F., 1301 S. 32nd, Louisville, Sp 8-0465, 

Me 5-6211 
Whipple. Lloyd G., 216 S. Frederick, Evansville, Ind., Gr 6-6809, 

Hi 4-3311 
Wigginton, Al., Sr., 1037 Cecil Ave., Louisville, Sp 6-7881, 

Sp 6-7881 
Williams, Bert O.. 668 Ohio St.. Lexington, 4-0057. 2-2626 
Williams, Felix, Jr., 417 N. Upper St., Lexington, 2-6297, 

Post Office 
Williams. James H., 116 Grove, Russell, Oak 889, Ashland, 

East 4-8282 



Williams, Reid, R. H. 1, Mt. Hermon 

Williams, Roy E., Deepwood Dr., R. R. 3, Elizabethtown, 

RO 6-4831 
Wilson, Jack R., 2220 Sharon Rd., Ashland, East 4-1234, 

East 5-1611 
Winfrey, Shelby, S Holly St., Berea, 805, 850 
Witt, Fred, Whitesburg, 2661 

Womack, Wm. H., 1131 Burris, Henderson, Va 6-9780, Va 6-2735 
Wurtz, Emil H., 18 E. 4th St., Cincinnati, Ohio, Gr l-05?6, 

Du 1-1232 



Registered Basketball Officials 

of The K. H. S. A. A— 1957-1958 

(List Compiled September 1, 1957) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it 
is the home phone unless otherwise designated. If two numbers 
are given, the first number is that of the borne phone. 

Adams, Ira R., Inez, 2332 (Bus. No.) 

Adkins, Alec K., Box 484, Pikeville 43? (Bus. No.) 

Adkirs, Raymond C, 1526 Beverly Blvd., Ashland, Ea 4-7229 

Akins, Charlie, White Mills, TO 2-1911 

Akridge, Dean, Fredonia, 4531, Marion 452 

Alexander, Rex E., College Station, Murray, 1292, 740, Ext. 15 

Allen, Nelson R., Hueysville, 4464 Wayland, Thompson Hall, 

Morehead 
Alwes, Donald R., Shipley Lane, Valley Station, WE 76348 
Angel, Jack, 621st QM HT Supply, Ft. Campbell, GE 94757, 

4470 
Armstrong, Thomas Richard, Route 2, Murray, 663W 
Arnold, Kenneth L., Route 2, Box 658, Fern Creek, Fc 3-5445, 

Fc 3267 
Bach, Bert C, 506 N. Broadway, Lexington, 3-0613 
Back, Adrian G. Jr., Hodgenville, El 8-3866, El 8-3474 
Baker, James A., R. R. 1, Wingo, Ev 22168 
Baker, James E., 2465 Main Street, Westwood Station, Ashland, 

East 4-6467, East 4-9226 
Bankemper, Jerome, 64 Licking Pike, Wilder, Co 1-1064, 

Co 1-6620, Line 158 
Bankemper, Thomas F., 1031 York Street, Newport, Co 1-0593 
Barker, Walter D., Route 6, Portsmouth, Ohio, Ul 8-2770 
Barry, Harold L., Route 1, Elizabethtown, Glendale 4303. 5-2226 
Batten, Wade Howard, Box 1611, Pueblo, Colorado, 4-2228 
Baumeyer, William A., 312 Euclid, Evansville. Ind., Gr 7-3108, 

Ha 6-2214 
Bell, Clarence T., 1228 S. 41st St., Louisville 11, Sp 8-7792, 

Ju 2-1696 
Bell, Thomas P., 1843 Glenhill Dr., Lexington, 2-2968, 2-1477 
Bennett, Bert A., 14 Doris Dr., Covington, Ju 1-2121, Co 1-1114 
Billings, B. E., Stanton, 2762, 2762 
Black, Amos. 325 Moreland, Harrodsburg, 1490, 711-J 
Blackburn, Viley O., 144 Richardson Dr., Somerset, 1113, 993 

or 162 
Blanton, Homer, 711 Belief onte. Princess Rd., Ashland, East 

4-1730 
Boggs, C. W., 961 May wick Dr.. Lexington. 2-2260, Ext. 82 

(Bus No.) 
Bolander, Albert J., 416 N. 26th St., Louisville 12, Sp 6-2046, 

Sp 6-9061 
Bolen, Edmon E., Loyall 
Bowman, Earl G. "Dick", 689 Mt. Vernon Dr., Lexington, 

6-0473, 2-3343 
Boyles, Jerry F., 3200 Park St., Ashland, East 4-6995, East 

4-1111, Ext. 229 
Bozarth. Frank, 6020 Athens Dr., Louisville 13, Ok 9-3019 
Bradberry, Calvin, Baxter, 2073R 
Bradshaw, Bill, Burgin, 5265 
Brichler, Joe A., 5737 Kiefer Ct., Cincinnati, Ohio, Ki 1-6049, 

Pa 1-1984 
Brizendine. Vic, 2711 Lakeside Dr., Louisville 6, GI 4-6843, 

Ju 7-9111 
Broderick, Carroll A., P. O. Box 346, Bowling Green, 2-5636, 

Brotzge, Maurice J., 3800 W. Broadway, Louisville, Sp-6-2506, 

Sp 6-2606 
Brown, James W., 122 Lancaster Ave., Richmond, 1558, 1776 
Brown, Thomas, 3598 Kenoak Lane, Cincinnati 13, Ohio, El 

1-6532, Re 1-7360 
Brugh, Walter, Box 624, Paintsville, 1114, 97 or 866 
Bryan, William B., Route 4, Paris, 4801, 4192 
Bryant, Jack E., 136 Morris Rd., Lookout Heights, Edison 

1-2819, Dunbar 1-1400, Ext. 220 
Buis, Nathaniel A., Liberty. 3471. 2852 

Burke. David L., 10113 Donav Lane, Valley Station, 21-8-3508 
Burke, Raymond, 408 7th, Pikeville, 971 J, 38 or 39 or 1840 
Burton, Dennis, Jr., Box 618, Hazard, North 1087, 75 
Busse, Carl Edward. 3113 Redbud Lane, Louisville, Gl 8-4431 
Butcher, Granville. Williamsport 399 (Bus. No. I 
Butcher, Joe M., Pikeville College, Pikeville, 9121 
Butcher, Paul, 134 Park St., Pikeville 
Butler, Donald, 2505 Iroquois Dr., Owensboro, Mu 3-3175, 

Mu 3-2401 
Byrd, Harry G., 7331 N. Timberlane Dr.. Madeira, Ohio, 

Lo 1-8745, Wo 1-7534 
Canter, John, 1809 Shady Lane. Apt. 3. Louisville, Hi 7281-M, 

Ju 7-8862 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1957 



Eichn 



nd. Ohi( 



26642 



■ille, 2179, 



Carnes, Richard, 110 Plenty, Ne 

Ri 2-220? 
Caruso, Richard A., 1964 Compton Rd., Cincinnati 31, Ohio, 

Ja 1-3349, Ga 1-3300 
Cassady, Richard, 608 Nutwood, Bowling Green, Vi 3-3606, 

Vi 3-9078 
Cathey, Gene S., 1416 Vine, Murray, 1179 M. Id 6-3221 
IJnalin, David L,., Box 46s, Wheelwright, 2741, 2261 
Chandler, Bobby G., 230 S. Morgan, Morganfleld, 79, 232 
Cnandler, James t'., 123 Main, Paintsville, 374 
Unattin, Charles, 232Ej Harrod St., Ashland, East 4-6386, East 

4-6464 
Chilton, John 0., Turners Station, Pont Royal 2606 
Chumbler, W. W., 1307 South 9th, Mayfield, 2821, 274" or 699 
Clark, Harold B., E. K. S. C. CPO Box 121. Richmond 
Coleman, L J. "Duke," Jr., 116 Arcadia Pk., Lexington, 6-1400, 

6-1400 
Combs, James Glen, 280 E. 3rd St., London, 278R, B19 
Combs, Travis, 610 N. Main, Somerset, 1239, 143 
Combs, Walter H., 2709 Iroquois, Ashland, East 4-4219, East 

4-2144 
Conley, George, 2436 Roosevelt Ave., Ashland, East 4-6042 
Conn, Hershel, Dana 
Connor, James E., 933 Saratoga Street, Newport, Ju 16121, 

Hi 17100 
Connor, Neal, 322 Division Street, Bellevue, Ju 11369, Hi 17100 
Cooper, F. John, Brooksville, Augusta 2343 
Cooper, Hewlett, Murray, S31-R-4, 330 

Cooper, John Wellington, P. O. Box 332, Danville 2090-J, 9102 
Cooper, Warren, 120 Barbour Ct., Morehead 
Coppage, Donald L., Route 1, Walton, Fl 7-5572, Fl 7-3071 
Cornn, Harold, 2053 St. Christopher, Lexington, 4-2812, 2-0265 
Cotton, Larry Joe, 805 Walnut St., Dawson Springs, 2610, 2610 
Coulter, William, 807 Taylor, Evansville, Ind., Ha 3-7510, 

Ha 4-4916 
Grace, James, 3354 Court, Catlettsburg, 218 
Craig, John G., Ennis, Rochester Exchange 
Craft, James T., "Tommy", 134 N. Main, : 

548, 3059 
Craft, William N., Jr., "Bill" 638 Longview Dr., Lexington, 

4-2361, 5-0160 
Crawford, Fred T., 1711 Blake Ave., Bowling Green, Vi 3-6441, 

Vi 3-9051 
Crosthwaite, John S., Jr., Box 589, Harlan. 2076, 57 
Crutcher, James W., 3210 Cawein Way, Louisville, Glendale 

8-6830, Emerson 6-5821, 6-7072 
Crutcher, Joseph Lamar, Box 346, Vine Grove, 112W2 
Cubbage, Tom, 317 N. English, Leitchfield, 80, 67-M 
Cullivan, Jim. Sycamore St., Murray, 2060, 740 Ext. 15 
Gulp, Capt. Willard E., Co. A, 326th Eng. Br., Ft. Campbell, 

4307, 2971 
Cummings, Dale A., 303 Forrestdale, Fulton, 
Cummins, Albert B., 8706 Plainfield Rd., Cii 

Sy 1-1536, Po 1-4100, Ext. 2166 
Cummins, Joshua W., 2139 Memorial Pky., Ft. Thomas, Hi 

1-1679, Po 4100, Ext. 1401 
Curtis, Robert L., 700 Main St., Manchester, Ohio, 73Y, 38 
Dale, Pat, 700A College St., Georgetown, 826 
Damico, Ernie, 17E8 E. McMillian St., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

Wo 1-8068, Ch 1-5820, Ext. 386 
Daum, Charles A., 6201/, N. 4th Ave., Evansville, Ind., Ha 

4-4933, Ha 28806 
Davenport, William T., 315 Village Dr., Elizabethtown, 6-6461, 

U. S. Post Office 
Davis, Dwight R., 3616 Hycliffe Ave., Louisville, Tw 6-7302, 

Ju 7-7531, Ext. 201 
Davis, Ralph E., Vanceburg, Swift 6-4601, Swift 6-2621 
Davis, William, "Bunny", 128 7th, Danville, 2079 
Denton. Charles M., 1427 Clay. Henderson. Va 6-4020, Va 6-3195 
DiMuzio, Robert M., 6422 Golfway Dr., Cincinnati, Ohio, Ki 

1-2220, Wa 1-1180 
Dixon, Charles T., 101 Humston Dr., Lawrenceburg 9-4080, 



Downing, Thomas E., Gamaliel, HE 4-1 
Driskell. Earl, .Tr., 1002 Cecil Ave., 

Me 77621, Ext. 260 
Eads. Walter, Monticello, 17013, 262 

Eaton, James Marvin, 214 Carolyn, Greenville. 624 J 
Edelen, Ben R., 3309 Wellingmoor, Louisville. Gl 4-3518 
Edwards, Hubert. 612 Tutt St.. Columbia. 6332, 4531 
Edwards. Lloyd, Prestonshurg, 2718. 2347 
Ellington. Japies E.. 18 Division St., Erlanger. Di 1-6058, 

Ju 1-7946 
Ellis, Walter H., West Paducah, 3-1439, 
Elovitz, Carl, 1920 Spring Gr 

Vers. 720 

EIrod. Turner, 332 Sumpter Ave.. Bowling Green. 2-5110. 3-4334 
Engle, Orville, 128 Oak St., Pineville, 7-2916 
Fagues, Homer, Combs. Oak 907 

Fallon, Robert J.. 709 Eversole. -Hazard. High 339, Main 484 
Fenne, Donald. 23 Chapel View, Wilmore, 9161 
Ferrell, Doc. 641 Hill-N-Dale, Lexington. 4-1861, 4-0301 
Fiex, Jimmie W., Western Ky. State College. Bowling Green, 

Vi 3-9G35. Vi 3-4334. Ext. 21 
Fields. Joe D., Route 1, Gilbertsville, Fo 24362. Paducah 24311 
Figg, Charles R., Navaho Trail, Frankfort, CA 7-2146, CA 3-0B65 



Flagg, Robert A., 3212 Ainslie Way, Louisville 5, Gl 8-6896, 

iw 5-3462 
Flynn. Booby, 100 Halls Lane, Lexington, 4-7924, 2-9474 
ford, Joe 1., 600 Hillside, Mayiieid, 1739, 2371 
lorsythe, Robert, 113 Chestnut, Greenville, 949, 474 
I'ort, Jonn W., Pleasant View, 4841 
J-'ortney, Robert Lee, 2817 Breckenridge Lane, Louisville, 

Gl 8-1079, Ju 2-3611, Ext. 474 
Foster, Berryman. 927 Waverly Dr., Lexington, 3-1827, 2-0616 
Fraley, Bill S., 1604 Lee Dr., Henderson, 7-9410 
Franc, Anthony, Equality High School, Equality, 111., 41 

(Bus. No.) 
Francis, Royce L., 725 Algonquin Pk'wy., Louisville, ME 5-6931, 

JU 7-0039 
Frazer, Tom Roe, 212 E. Belleville, Marion, 20, 4 
i'reese. Oliver T., 6661 Meadowridge Lane, Cincinnati 37, Ohio, 

El 1-4791, Me 1-2295 
Fugate, E. Hugh. Price, McDowell, 2911, Prestonshurg 2649 
Fultz. Jack. Box 636. Olive Hill, 3661, 4691 
Fuson, Shelvie, 312 Englewood, Middlesboro, 1541, 263 
Gamble, Gerald Eugene, Earlington. 5435 
Gardner, H. E.. 307 Poplar Dr., Elizabethtown, 5-4461, Fort 

Knox 4654 
Gates, William H., Jr., 125 Travels Rd., Louisville, Tw 52310, 

Me 6-1381 
Gettler, John F., 705 Providence Rd.. Lexington, 2-8845, 2-5494 
Gilbert, Lawrence "Butch", Eads Street. Cambpellsville 386 

(Bus No.) 
Giles, .Jonathan W.. 3404 Greenwood, Louisville, Sp 8-1976, 

Ju 4-6183 
Gish, Delmas, 204 W. Third Street, Central City. 618W. 9 
Gish, Stanley, Jr., 1130 Columbia Street, Newport, Ju 1-0917, 

Ga 1-1800 
Golden. Billy Joe, 668 Main St., Lynch, Vi 8-2612 
Goley, James E., 10 Utz Dr., Florence, At 3-5646, Ax 1-5447 
Grace, Charles K., Cypress St., Pineville, Ed-7-3331, Ed 7-2392 
Grady, Clarence, 430 N. Main, Marion, 95, 60 
Graehler, Albert J., 1227 Hess Lane, Louisville, Me 6-1601, 

Ju 2-2514 
Graham, Harry, 714 A. Warrendale, Georgetown, 1172-M 
Greene, Omar Paul. 1806 Scott Street. Covington, Ju 1-1706 
Greenslait. James W.. Brown St.. Raceland. 4-2156, Ext. 219 

(Bus No.) 
Greenwood. Robert N.. Crestwood. Pewee Valley 6-2263 
Griese, Warren J., R. 1, Box 226-6, Evansville, Ind., Yu 5-2S80, 

3-4052 
Grimes, James W., Lewisburg 
Grimes, Mike, 13 Beckridge Dr., S. Ft. Mitchell, Di 1-6724, 

Ma 1-5083 
Grone. Freddie. 1125 Win Ave.. Ashland. Ea 48320. Ea 48320 
Gustafson, Alford, Jr., "Gus", 240 Francis Bldg., Louisville, 

Gl 4-6151, Ju 4-2058 
Hadden. Newell P.. Jr., 942 Wolf Run Rd., Lexington, 5-5332, 



Haga 



2-78 



tph E.. 3000 Sherbrooke 



8-1325 



Louisville 
Hale, H. Ed, 288 Hillsboro. Lexington. 4-0017 
Hall, C. E., Jr., 1317 Edsel. Worthington 
Hall. Jack R.. 315 W. Hill. Louisville, Me 7-9866, Sp 8-2731, 

Ext. 353 
Hall. Rudy L., Jr., Route 2. Calvert City. La 7-8067 
Hamblin. Gayle. Krypton 

Hammons. Norman. Route 4, Hopkinsville, Tu 6-5915. Tu 5-6914 
Hancock. Morris W.. R. R. 1. Fulton. 1222-R2, 9166 
Hannum. Harry, 3192 West Tower Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, 

Hu 1-1603, Wo 1-3760 
Harp Gene, Route 2. Cynthiana. Sunrise, 520 
Harrell, Bill D., Ky. Methodist Home, Versailles, 107, 107 
Harris, Jerry Lee, R. E. 1, Rockhold, Corbin 1064J1 
Harrod, Edmon, Route 4. Frankfort. Ca 3-0268 
Hartley, William E.. 1121 Marshall Ave.. Evansville. Ind., 

Gr 7-0631, Gr 7-0631 
Hatfield. Gene Edwin. 202 Taylor. Fulton. 1274. 708 Union 

City. Tenn. 
Hawkins. Ralph B.. 661 E. Broadway, Madisonville, 2927, 210 
Hayden. Samuel J.. Fancy Farm. Ma 3-3641, 33181 
Haynes, John. 416 Clay St., Henderson, VA 7-5137 
Head, Elmo C, 113 Alton, Shelbyville. 1273 W. 142 
Hedges. George. Jr., Dry Ridge, Ta 3-2281, Ta 3-9061 
Herndon. Alton E.. 424 College. Paducah. 2-1153 
Howling. Richard A.. 211 Linden. Newport. Ax 1-2299, Me 

1-0010 
Hibbs. Eugene M.. 109 E. Arch, Madisonville. 2639. 210 
Hildreth. David Paul, Pi Kappa Alpha House, Georgetown, 

1218 
Hodge. Don Robert, 1012 S. E. 2nd Street, Evansville. Ind., 

Ha 3-2436 
Hodge, Fred, 2011 Joyce Ave., Evansville. Ind.. Gr 7-2993 
Hodges. Holbert, 516 N. Hill. London. 208 Z 
Hoferer, Louis R.. 420 McClelland. Cincinnati 17, Ohio, 

Ca 1-3022. Wa 1-9841 
Holden. Frye H.. Centertown. 1202 
Holeman. Bill R., Box 433. Manchester. 2289. 2289 
Hopper. Edwin. Box 183. Russell Springs. 119-02 
Hornsby. .John W., 826 N. 26th. Paducah. 2-1762. 66311. Ext. 657 
Houchin. Robert R., Apt. B-3, Colonial Court. Bowling Green, 

Vi 3-6988 
Howard. Jimmy D., 1021 Husband Rd.. Padu 
Howard, Joseph W., 606 S. Seminary, Madis 



. 2-0198. 5-5629 
■ille, 3117, 92 



Howard, Oscar D., 256 Vets Village, Richmond 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1957 



Page Nine 



Hubbard, Joel JVl., IViorehead State College, Morehead 

Hudson, J. D., Caneyville 

Hudson, Oscar, 70S Highland Ave., Hazard, Grand 638 

Huff, Carl R., 1017 W. Uelaware, Evansville. Ind., Ha 2-7234 

Hunley, Neil P., West Liberty, Sti 3-3131 

Hunt, Jack L., 920 Greenwood, Clarksville, Tenn., 5-5804 

Hunt, Leonard D., 316 t:,, 5th, Lexington, 2-0236 

Hutt, Joseph D., Jr., 608 Wallace, Louisville, Tw 3-5060, 

Ju 4-3545 
Hyatt, Robert L., 1291 Airway Ct., Louisville 5, Glendale 

8-1565, Glendale 8-1565 
Hyland, Frank Dixon, P. O. Bo.x 465, South Webster, Ohio, 

Scioto 2211. Waverly 5100 
James, William V., 537 S. Lafayette, Beaver Dam, 4928, 

Owensboro Nat'l Bank 
Jarvis, Lindle, 934 Spanish Ct., Wilmette, 111., AL 1-0631 
Jenkins, James D., R. K. 1, Bowling Green, 2-5954, 2-5954 
Jenkins, Kean, 210 Morningside, Elizabethtown, RO 5-4087, 

RO 5-40S7 
Johnson, James M., Box 367, Jenkins, 64-J 

Johnson, Waller. Grayson. GRanite 4-4689. GRanite 4-5581 
Johnson, \Vm. Bernard, R. R. 7, Hopkinsville. Amhurst 9-2208, 

TUxedo 5-5366 
Jones, Boyer, 437 Jackson St., Campbellsville, 507-M, 184 
Jones, Carson G., 709 N. Main, Evansville, Ind., Ha 2-3069, 

4-7741, Ext. 360 
Jones, Geo. W., Jr., 216 Christ Rd., Evansville, Ind., HA 2-3348, 

HA 5-2661 
Jones, Joseph, 2710 Shuck Ln., Louisville, 21-95898, ME 4-8311 
Jones, Wendell, 320 2nd St., P. O. Box 384, Morehead 
Jordan, Forbis, Bremen, 451 M-2, 41 
Justice, Morris W., Box 316 A, Pikeville, 703-J 
Keene, Marcum, Biggs, Dunlap 1 (Bus. No.) 
Key, Callvin, Hazel, HY 2-3431 or Hy 2-2341 
Kimmel, Jerry, Beechmont, Drakesboro, Gr 6-2656 
King, Alien, 424 N. Brady, Morganfield, 532W, 2 or 3 
King, Edwin C, 1715 E. 4th. Owensboro, Mu 3-0806, Mu 3-5636 
King, James E., R. R. 1, Radcliff 
King, John J., Jr., 1758 Dixdale, Louisville 10, Sp 6-3732, 

Me 4-8313 
King, P. J., 307 Coast Guard Ln., Owensboro 3-2401 (Bus No.) 
King, Russell, 943 Whitney Ave., Lexington, 4-3049, 2-2370 
Kinman, Joe T., Williamstown, Taylor 4-8631 
Knight, Bill, 752 N. 36th, Paducah, 3-2775, 3-1957 
Kok, George W., 9406 .lanna Dr., Valley Station. 21-85436 
Kremer, Joseph A., 3727 Glenmeade Rd., Louisville 18, Gl 4-3991, 

Ju 7-7747 
Lashbrook, Harry Eugene, Jr., 607 Warwick Dr., Owensboro, 

Mu 3-0831, Mu 3-2431 
Lawson, Leland, 949 Deporres, Lexington, 4-1009 
Lazarus. Rhea Price, 516 E. 14th, Bowling Green, Vi 3-8398 
Leach, Aaron "Pete", McHenry, 4906, Central City 13 
LeVan, T. F., Box 823. Benton. La 7-3221, La 7-4521 
Lewis, Jack C, Pineville, Ed 7-2481 
Little, James Glen, Hellier 
Logsdon, David L., 1160 Lincoln Ave., Louisville, Me 7-3192, 

Sp 6-3921 
Long, William G., Jr., 209 Idlewylde Dr., Louisville 6, 

Tw 5-8731, Me 5-5211 
Longenecker, David M., 3910 Olympic, Louisville, Tw 6-9071. 

Tw 5-3401, E.xt. 301-2 
Looney, Dick, Riverview Dr., Pikeville, 813 
Lucas. Gene T., 412 Clayton Ave.. Georgetown, 1371. 19 
Ludwig, Harry F., Louisville Country Day School, Louisville 7, 

Be 5380, Be 3452 
Lusbv, George, Clinton St., Georgetown, 1073. 1334 
Lvons, Charles S.. R. R. 2, Sharpsburg, 2457 
Lytic, Wm. Price. 927 E. 13th, Hopkinsville, Tu 5-8903, Tu 5-8588 
McClaskey, Booker, Boston. Te 3-4725, Ft. Knox, 4916 
McCowan, Connell, R. R. 1, Box 251, Corbin, 2361 
McCully, Ray, R. R. 2, Dixon, ME 9-2321 
McNeil, Patrick, McPherson Dr., Madisonville, 3464, 2402 
McPike, Ray S., Jr., 309 Theatre Bldg., Louisville 2, Hi 6398 W, 

Ju 5-2832 
Macon, Alan Leon, 1759 Wilart Dr., Louisville, Sp 6-7906, 

Ju 4-1361, Line 473 
Macy, Lowell Z., 218V> W. 24th St., Owensboro 
Mahan, Carle "Buddy", 16 French, Winchester, 1717, Lex- 
ington 2-0290 
Marble, Luke, 4226 W. Broadway, Louisville, Sp 8-5146, 

Sp 8-7249 
Martin, Jennings, Mousie 

Martin, John B., 202 S. Ky. St., Corbin 847-R, 1348 
Matarazzo, Salvatore M., 320 N. Mulberry, Elizabethtown, 

RO 5-5689 
May, E. B., Jr., Box 185, Prestonsburg, 2314, 7661 
Mavo, Henrv L., Jr.. 581 College. Paintsville. 856, 29 & 30 
Melton, Curtis Ray, General Delivery, Nebo. 2802, TA 1-3870 
Menshouse, Glen, 2017 Main, Ashland, East 4-5397 
Meredith, Clement A., R. R. 5, Brownsville 
Meyer, Bud, 5319 Lilibet Ct., Cincinnati, Ohio, Bl 1-3459, 

Du 1-5411 
Middleton, Howard W.. Dry Ridge, TAylor 4-4533 
Miles, Joseph D.. 124 Harrison. Jeffersonville. Ind.. Bu 2-4794, 

Shawnee H. S., Louis\'ille 
Miller, Jack, College St.. Barbourville, 417 
Miller, Wm. A.. 1601 Shelby Ave., Evansville 14, Ind., GR 

6-9542, HA 5-7276 
Miracle, Ed, Millstone, Neon 4621 



Mitchell, Emmett, 2»4 Taylor Drive, Lexington, 5-2480, 4-4255 
Moll, l^rancis B., 620 Mulberry, Mt. Vernon, Ind., PO 3-2870, 

Po 3-4469 
Monahan, Wm. G., 103 Oaklawn Dr., Frankfort, CA 3-3362, 

CA 7-2231, Ext. 312 
Moore, Ed, Vets' Village, Morehead 
Moore, James E., Lcndon, 889 L. Corbin 1915 
Moore, Robert W., Jr., 217 Center, Florence, AT 3-5578, 

HE 1-4040 
Moore, Roy, Jr., London, 398 J, 24 
Moser, Rudy Clay, R. R. 2, Sebree 

Mouser, Henry D., Princeton Rd., Madisonville, 327 M, 1298 
Mueller, Frank J., 3850 Shroyer Kd., Dayton, Ohio 
Mullins, B. E., Paintsville, 432, 646 
Mussman, Ralph, Jr., 502 Monroe, Newport. JU 1-4562, CO 

1-1300 
Myers, Edward B., 312 Seay St., Glasgow, OL 1-2445 
Nau, Bill, Barbourville, 203, 317 

Neal, Gene, 549 Wasnington, New Richmond, Ohio, RI 2-3641 
Newman, Chas., S3A Rose Terrace, Ft. Knox, 2050 (.Bus. No.) 
Newman, E. B., 602 Fifth, Paintsville, 1287 
Newnam, Luther G., Beattyville, IN 4-2560, IN 4-8132 
Newsome, Forest, Wheelwright, 2784, 2142 

Newton, 0. M., 2041 Dellwood Dr., Lexington. 2-6669, 4-2431 
Nixon, James W., R. R. 7, Honkinsville, TU 6-2641 
Noble, Chas. B., Main, Jackson, 6-2728, 6-9224 
Noel, Robert A., R. R. 3, Winchester, 766 M-2 
O'Bryan, Robert, 1736 Harvard Dr., Louisville. GR 8-7675, 

JU 7-9111, Ext. 34 
O'Daniel, Jeff, R. R. 1, Lebanon, 7112 
Omer, Billy W., R. R. 5, Madisonville, Taylor 1-2833 
Overly, Wm. H., 210 N. Maple, Somerset, 1294, 1294 
Owen, Arthur, 2627 Meadow Lark Ln., Evansville, Ind. HA 

3-7883 
Page, Forrest C, 3007 Taylor, Evansville, Ind., GR 7-0088, 

GR 6-7211 
Palmer, Carl A., Ironton, Ohio, 4171 

Park, J. M., 924 Yarbro Lane, Paducah, 6-6567, 5-6292 
Patrick, Chas. C, R. R. 2, Lexington, 4-4516 
Paulin, Al, Tell City, Ind., 436 R 
Pergrem, Nard, 2616 Country Club Ct., Ashland, East 4-7664, 

4-1155, Ext. 390 
Perry, James E., R. R. 6, Paducah, 3-6740, 5-6886 
Petty, John F., R. R. 1, Gracey, Adams 5-6063 
Phelps, John B., 302 Johnson Rd., London, 26 W, 103 
Phelps, Ralph, "Rudy", Box 533, Russell, GR 172, 425 
Pittard, Fred W., 129 Mimosa Ln., Paducah, 3-6680, Calvert 

City, EX 5-4121 
Poe, Thomas Ervin, R. R. 6. Benton, LA 7-7663 
Pridemore, Franklin D., Barbourville 1, Stevenson Hall 
Racel, David, Watterson Trail, Jeffersontown, Lambda Chi 

House. Lexington 
Radjunas, Stan E., 1644 Elliott Ave., Ashland, East 4-1896, 

East 4-1896 
Rainey, Jimmy, 16 Phillips Court, Winchester. 1440, 558 
Rail. Eugene, 124 W. Todd, Frankfort, 7-2355. 7-2231, Ext. 202 
Randall. H. C. 106 Church, Columbia, Fu. 4-4661, Fu. 4-4711 
Redman, Malvern G.. 206 Edson Street, Mt. Vernon, Ind., 

P.O. 3-3328, P.O. 3-2637 
Reed. Gordon, 1603 N. Ft. Thomas Ave., Ft. Thomas, Hi 1-4946, 

Du 1-4507 
Renfro. John Edwin, Pikeville College, Pikeville, 1456R, 9102 
Reynolds. Charles W., 410 W. 4th, P.O. Box 164, Brookport, 

111. 2501, 2-1691 Paducah 
Reynolds, Howard M., 407 Holt Ave., Mt. Sterling, 1058 
Reynolds, W. J., Jr., Martin, 3020 

Rice- James F., 506 Morehead, Central City, 205, 674 
Rice, Willard S.. 1702 Farmer Ave., Murray, 487-W, 9125 
Richards. James, Box 94, Columbia, Fu 4-3135 
Richardson. Charles E., Waco, 2401, 4021 
Rickard, Bob, 805 Clay, Owensboro 

Riggs, William T., 28 Congress Dr., Morganfield, 590, 9168 
Robbins, Robert A., 400 Culpepper, Lexington, 2-2148 
Roberts. Earl C, Science Hill, 19R. 19 
Robertson, William R., Springfield, 9955, 4164 
Robinson, Donald C, Box 452, Corbin 2143, 760 
Robinson, Eugene, McDowell Ave., Cynthiana, 113-R, 986-Wl-3 
Rocke, James M., 10 Lewis Circle, Erlanger, Di 19082, 

Ax 12523 
Roller, Otis, 3712 Nanz Ave., Louisville, TW 5-6356, JU 7-1121, 

Ext. 302 
Rolph, Harold J.. 915 S. 7th St.. Ironton, Ohio, 2059 K, 1390 
Rosenbaum, Robert, 117 Fairlawn, Louisville, TW 7-2833, 

JU 4-8191 
Rountree. John T., 686 So. 44th Rd., Louisville, SP 5-6555, 

EM 6-9511 
Rouse, Clyde L., 630 Erlanger Rd., Erlanger, Di 1-6943, 

HE 1-3604 
Rubarts. Leland G., Dunnville, Liberty 2784 (Bus. No.) 
Russell, Allen, Box 81, Murray. 821-W 
Russell, Eugene. 1106 Gallia Street, Portsmouth, Ohio, EL 

3-7653, EL 3-4370 
Russell, Joe, Box 11, Russelllville, PA 6-6983. PA 6-6983 
Sabato. Al, 7621 View Place Drive, Cincinnati 24, Ohio, VA 

1-3646, PA 1-1052 
St. Clair. Robert L., Jr., 435 No. 29th, Louisville, SP 4-2911, 

EM 6-1368 
Samples, Gilbert, 306 East 3rd, London, 221 J, 624 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1957 



Sanders, Mel, 3910 Sunset, Paducah, 2-3650, 5-6311, Ext. 685 
toaylor, Deward, WalJins (Jreek, Morris 4-3594 
Scnarlenberger, Irvin T., 7zti7 Jetnve Lane. Madeira, Ohio, 

LO 1-B378, LO 1-6378 
Scheben, W. J., Erlanger, DI 5832 
Schnebelt, Carl K., ±lanover, Ind., 9-3843, 9-4661 
Schu, Wilbur, 106 W. Mam, Georgetown, 1297, 1297 
Hchwitz, Joe, 1419 SweeLser Ave., JlJvansville. ind., GR 7-2933 
Scott, Bill, 1816 McDonald, Le.\ington, 2-3316, 4-3662 
Scully, Tliomas L., Jr., 1427 Earl Ave., L<ouisville, Em 7-8829, 

Em 3-0277 
Seelye, Arthur L.., 2309 Jones, Paducah, 3-4405 
Selvy, Curt, Corbin, 1333 
Settle, Roy G., 1413 St. Mary's Ave., Owensboro, MU 3-2136, 

MO 3-3574 
Shaw, Donald Lee, Union College, College St., Barbourville, 

College Gym. (Bus. No.; 
Shaw, Stanley E., 4460 W. 8th Street, Cincinnati 38, Ohioj 

GK 1-1100, MU 1-3510 
Shirley, Henry R., S. Park Rd., R. R. 2, Bo.x 485, Fairdale, 

EM 8-3260, SP 8-2731, Ext. 353 
Shively, Howard, Jr., Radcliff, 192 M, 192 M 
Shope, Lowell M., 30 Webb, South Webster, Ohio, Scioto 2131, 

Waverly 51U0, Ext. 2665 
Showalter, John, Georgetown, 662 
Singleton, Vesper, Anco 
Sloan, Wallace, 4l9 Oread Road, Louisville, TW 5-1126, 

TW 7-2554 
Smith, Darrell Carlton, 2090 Edgeworth Dr., Lexington, 4-3166, 

2-2776 
Smith, Edgar J., 3904 Farmview Ave., Louisville 18, GL 8-1286, 

i^cii 6-8746 
Smith, Edwin B., 1905 Gary Ave., Bowling Green, 2-7112 
ynntn, Elza, Box 247, Beauty, Warfield 4886 
Smith, Jack, 57 Mitchell Hill Dr., Madisonville, 2687-W 
Smith, Wilbur G., 629 Brown Street, Kaceiand, Oak 954 
Smith, Wilbur W., Comer & College, Horse Cave, ST 6-6131, 

ST 6-6181 
Snider, Louis G., 2103 Debera Way, Louisville 18, GL 8-5248, 

GL 4-7511, E.xt. 
Stanfiil, Robert S., Louisa, Med. 8-4657, Ashland Oil, ext. B57, 

Ashland, Ky. 
Steenken, Wm. R., 1636 Highland, Covington. ED 1-3789, HE 

1-3108 
Stephens, Clarence W., 943 Bryan, Lexington, 4-1224, 2-1497 
Stephenson, Harry S.. Transylvania College, Lexington, 4-9620, 

4-2431 
Stewart, Herbert T., Lothair, High 89 
Stone, Doyle C, 109 Moundale, Winchester, 2973 
Strange, William L., 306 Sycamore, Elizabethtown, RO 5-7851, 

RO 6-5286 
Strong, Arnett, 425 Cedar, Hazard, N 389, 3300 
Strong, David A., Ft. Amador, Canal Zone, Panama 
Surgill, Barkley J., N. Lake Dr., Prestonsburg, 6781, 2391 
Stutler, John P.. 1621 Cumberland, South Hilis, Covington, 

ED 1-2631, RE 1-6224 
Sullivan, Don C, 523 Riverside Dr., Prestonsburg, 4791, 2530 
Sullivan, Wallace Bryan, Stearns 

Sykes, Harry N., 439 Bamberger Rd., Lexington 6-2252 
Taft, Gayle E., 1410 Hill St., Lexington 
Taylor, Robert S., 2231 Hawthorne, Louisville, GL 4-3423, 

ME 4-1581 
Teague, Amos, Chickasaw Dr., Madisonville, TA 1-4639 
Thomas, Harold E., 74B1-B Tank Bn., 10th St., Ft. Knox. 

6860, 6757 
Thompson, Jack, 2347 Saratoga Dr., Louisville, Hi 4183 
Thompson, Ralph, 649 Ivy Hill, Cincinnati, Ohio, Bl 1-3394, 

Wa 1-0047 
Thurman, Harold W., R. R. 1, Livermore, BR 8-2339, Owens- 
boro MU 3-6936 
Tichenor, Billy, R. R. 3, Hartford, 224-LLS, Bowling Green, 

Vi 2-7080 
Tipton, Asa I., 828 Hillwood, Frankfort, 3-8714, 3-1641 
Todd, Lonnie H., 644 S. Scott St., Madisonville, 3403, 271 
Tompkins, Chester B.. Box 13, Slaughters, Tu 4-2693 
Topmiller, Ben, Jr., Browder, Gr 6-2628, Greenville 942 
Tuck, L. Ochell, 124 Lexington Dr., Glasgow, 3331, 3811 
Tucker, Neal R., Box 76, Dunmor, Lewisburg SK 5-8666 
Vandenberg, Ralph H., 3126 S. Farmcrest, Cincinnati 13, Ohio, 

Me 1-9072, Ki 1-1800 - 633 
Varner. Ray G., 1002 Birch Dr., Lexington, 2-5432, 5-4224, 

Ext. 210 
Vaughn, Melvin, R. R. 5, London 
Vettiner, Charles J., Ai-mory Bldg., Louisville 
Vice, Cliff. .Tr., Carlisle, 63S-J3, 87 

Vineyard. Chalmer Eugene, 401 S. Main, Somerset, 1424 
Wade, Bill, Dewey Ct.. Frankfort, CA 3-.3034. CA 3-3034 
Waldrop, Douglas, Park City, SH 9-2196 
Walke, Glenn R., 902 1st St., Paintsville. 91, Prestonsburg 

2-680 
Walker, Paul R., 224 S. Mulberry St., Elizabethtown, RO 6-4624, 

RO 5-4604 
Wallen, Howard Wendell, Williamsport 
Wallin, Buddy M., 220 Vets Village, Richmond, 2814-.T 
Walter, Lafyaette 66th St., Ashland, East 4-7661, 4-6191 
Wanchic, Nicholas, 605 Holly Hill Dr., Lexington, 3-2880 - 318 

(Bus. No.) 
Ward, Tommy, Marsee Dr., Harlan, 1930-W, 522 



Watkins, Earl, P. O. Box 18, Jackson, NO 6-2369 

Weber, John, 4829 Kollman Ave., Covington, AX 1-5199 

Welch, John H., Neon, 7746 

Welch, Ralph W., 3011 Wedgewood Way, Louisville 6, 01 8-1746 

Welch, Tom, 3932 Vine Vista PL, Cincinnati 17. Ohio, Av 1-8094, 

Ga 1-5700, Ext. 371 
Wells, Milford, Prestonsburg, 6101, 7731 
Westerfield, Glenn, 536 Sta.nley, Evansville, Ind., HA 3-9570, 

HA 4-7741 
Whalen, Wm. Clinton, R. R. 1, Maysville, LO 4-3942, LO 4-34G1 
Whedbee, Melville F., 1301 S. 32nd, Louisville, Sp 8-0466, 

Me 5-5211 
Whipple, Lloyd G., 216 S. Frederick, Evansville. Ind., Gr. 6-5809, 

Ha 4-3311 
White, Wm. Jason, Eddyville, 3052, 3391 
Wigginton, Al, Sr., 1037 Cecil Ave., Louisville, Sp 6-7881, 

Sp 6-7881 
Wilcox, Edgel M., Oil Springs 

Williams, Bobbie, 144 Aspen Ave., Richmond, 2671 
Williams, Lewis P., Burkesville 
Williams, James H., 116 Grove, Russell, Oak 889, Ashland 

Fast 4-8282 
Williams, Reid V., R. R. 1, Mt. Hermon 
Williams, Roger, 706 Poplar, Ravenna, 139-L 
Winchester, Roy L., Vaughn Mill Rd., Box 164, R. R. 10, 

Louisville 18. Cedar 9-6202, Cedar 9-3267 
Winfrey, Shelby, 8 Holly St., Berea, 805, 850 
Withrow, Roy D., 424 Res. Ave., Central City, 742-W, Owens- 
boro Mu 3-9160 
Woford, Ernest, 222 S. 4th, Danville, 1276-W, 2576-J 
Wom.ack, Wm. H., 1131 Burris, Henderson. VA 6-9780, VA 

6-2735 
Wright, Billy Joe, Salt Lick, OR 4-3927 
Wurtz, Emil H., 18 E. 4th St., Cincinnati, Ohio, GR 1-0526, 

DU 1-1232 
Yates. Wm. D., R. R. 2, Fulton, 1580 R, 9176 
Yeary, Wm. H., Jr.. 156 Lowry Lane, Lexington, 2-6945, 2-6603 



NATIONAL FEDERATION ANNUAL MEETING 

(Continued from Page Three) 
ley, California recently became Assistant Sec- 
retary of the California Interscholastic Fed- 
eration. He will assist W. W. Russell in ad- 
ministering the affairs of the California 
Federation. Brice Durbin of Topeka, Kansas 
is the newly-elected Assistant Secretary of 
the Kansas State High School Activities As- 
sociation. He will assist Carl Kopelk in the 
work of that organization. Norman J. Mans- 
field is the Assistant Secretary of the New 
Jersey State Interscholastic Athletic Associa- 
tion. Alvin Chang is Secretary of the Hawaii 
High School Athletic Association. In addition 
to these newly-elected men, H. W. Jennings 
of Petaluma, California was included with 
the initiates since it was pointed out that, 
even though he has served the North Coast 
Section for many years, he had not been of- 
ficially initiated. In addition to these men 
who were present for interesting initiation 
ceremonies, it was announced that Floyd Lay, 
Field Secretary of the Florida High School 
Activities Association, and Thomas Whalen 
of the Vermont Headmasters Association 
had become Executive Officers since the last 
meeting, serving on a part-time basis. 

The opening general session on Wednesday 
nig'ht included an interesting "Parade of 
States", which involved participation by the 
young people of the group. The pageant was 
efficiently supervised by the committee. 

A ceremony honoring Past-Commissioner 
E. A. Thomas and Mrs. Thomas was con- 
ducted on Thursday night at the non-athletic 



THE KE.NTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1957 



Page Eleven 



session. A memorial tribute to prominent 
members of the group who had passed away 
since the last meeting was paid by Secretary 
Henry De Young (Washington). Those 
specifically listed are R. L. Bates of Enter- 
prise, Alabama, William A. Fisher of Lynden, 
Washington, Leonard L. McLucas of Jack- 
sonville, Florida, D. R. Mitchell of Lehi, 
Utah and H. L. Ray of Chicago, Illinois. Cita- 
tion certificates were presented in an im- 
pressive ceremony with Vive-President L. 
T. Havig presiding. 

Speakers and others who had an active 
part in the program included most of the 
State Executive Officers and many Board 
of Control officers and members. In addit- 
ion, interesting presentations were made by 
Dade County (Florida) Superintendent of 
Schools Joe Hall; Deputy State Superinten- 
dent of Florida Schools J. K. Chapman ; Dr. 
Clair E. Turner (National Foundation for 
Infantile Paralysis) ; Howard A. Hobson 
(A.A.H.P.E.R) ; Harvey Harman (Football 
Hall of Fame) ; John L. Longfellow (Presi- 
dent of the National Association of Intercol- 
legiate Athletics) ; Don McClanen (Fellow- 
ship of Christian Athletes) ; J. Eugene Rings- 
dorf (U. S. Soccer Association) ; and Milton 
Raymer (American Junior Bowling Con- 
gress) . 

Announcement was made concerning a 
friendly alliance which had been completed 
during the year with the National Junior 
College Athletic Association and of a pro- 
posed alliance with the National Association 
of Intercollegiate Athletics. The purpose is 
to further mutual and overlapping interests 
for which joint action will be of benefit to 
all groups. Dr. Norma Leavitt of the Univer- 
sity of Florida training staff attended the 
meeting as a representative of the National 
Section of Girls and Women's Sports, and 
participated in the discussion. 

The Friday night session included a fea- 
ture of the new film "Football For Millions" 
produced by the Official Sports Film Serv- 
ice under the supervision of Director W. M. 
Runyon. This was followed by the showing 
of an interesting reel of pictures taken by 
Commissioner Lee K. Anderson (Oklahoma) 
at last year's annual meeting. The film pro- 
gram also included a showing on Thursday 
night of a soccer film, an Olympic track film 
and a film depicting activities of the Fellow- 
ship of Christian Athletes. 

Secretary LaFayette Golden and members 
of the Florida Board of Control rendered 



many services and contributed to the smooth- 
ly functioning series of meetings. The Florida 
Association complimented the group with an 
interesting sight-seeing trip on buses secured 
by the Association. A majority of those in 
attendance took advantage of this trip along 
fabulous Collins Avenue on which are located 
deluxe hotels and motels in numbers which 
are fantastic. It also included a drive past 
some of the world famous estates in Miami. 

Popular activities engaged in by many of 
those in attendance included a complimen- 
tary beach luncheon for the young people, 
swimming, sun bathing, boat trips in Bis- 
cayne Bay, bridge and canasta. 

The Executive Committee met at 8:00 
P. M. Tuesday and at 1 :30 P. M. Saturday. At 
the Saturday meeting, newly-elected mem- 
bers C. H. Hancock of Great Falls, Montana, 
representing Section 6, and C. E. Wetmore, 
representing Section 4, were present. The 
committee organized by electing Homer Wil- 
liams (Idaho) President and W. R. Fugitt 
(West Virginia) Vice-President. 

Here is a brief summary of action taken 
by the National Council. The Hawaii High 
School Athletic Association was accepted as 
an affiliated member of the National Federa- 
tion. Three proposed additions to the list of 
recommended eligibility rules were acted 
upon and two of these were adopted. One of 
them is designed to prevent some of the evils 
which have or which might develop if high 
school athletes were permitted to attend 
clinics or camps in which one of the purposes 
is to give coaching instruction to such ath- 
letes. The other is a recommendation that 
each of the State Associations adopt a rule 
which prohibits the use of high school facil- 
ities or manpower in connection with any 
unapproved all-star contest which involves 
high school athletes or recent graduates 
whose prestige established during the prev- 
ious school year is the basis for selection on 
such all-star team. The Treasurer's report 
was approved. For the fiscal year ending 
January 31, the report showed an excess of 
receipts over disbursements of approximate- 
ly $14,000.00. Of this amount, about $7,800.00 
were received as interest and dividends from 
securities in the Federation working fund. 
In addition, about $4,700.00 were received 
as interest and dividends from securities in 
the Retirement Fund. Sales gain during the 
past fiscal year was approximately $8,870.00 
fo the Federation Fund and an additional 
sales gain for the Retirement Fund of about 
$6,800.00, for a total sales gain of approxi- 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1957 



mately $15,670. A list of all securities in 
both funds was inspected by the Council. 
The Mutual Legal Aid Pact was reviewed and 
full report was studied by each member of 
the Council. An election of Sections 2, 
4 and 6 resulted in the reelection of Her- 
man F. Keller (Indiana) of Section 2 and the 
election of C. E. Wetmore (Wisconsin) for 
Section 4 and of C. H. Hancock (Montana) 
for Section 6. Announcement concerning the 
1958 Federation meeting was made. The 
winter meeting of the National Football 
Committee, State Executive Officers and 
Federation Executive Committee will be at 
the Phoenix Hotel in Lexington, Kentucky on 
Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday, January 
6, 7 and 8, 1958. The next annual meeting 
will be held in California during the week of 
June 22-28, 1958. The exact dates depend on 
available accommodations but the dates of 
June 25-28 are preferred. The facilities in 
the Lake Tahoe area are being studied to 
determine whether they are adequate. Final 
action will be taken as soon as a California 
committee further investigates accommoda- 
tions. 

Pre-Meeting Activity 

Prior to the opening of the formal sessions, 
small groups convened to discuss specified 
topics. Those interested in athletic accident 
insurance and safety projects had a confer- 
ence Tuesday afternoon, June 25. Some of the 
discussion centered around problems which 
are created by athletic insurance firms which 
make this type of insurance a means of mak- 
ing contacts which may balance an operat- 
ing loss. Among such companies there is 
considerable turnover from year to year. It 
is not uncommon for a company to enter the 
field at an extremely low rate and then find 
it necessary to discontinue the program or to 
increase the rates. All of this provides a type 
of competition which creates difficulty. An- 
other problem centers around unscheduled 
coverage in an Association benefit plan. This 
reimburses a school for any medical or hos- 
pital expense which has been incurred, with- 
out specifically stating in the schedule the 
amount which should be paid for care of such 
injuries. Representatives from California, 
Kentucky and Wisconsin commented on the 
unsatisfactory nature of such efforts. Among 
those who commented on experiences in sub- 
sidizing the insurance program were Messrs. 
C. E. Forsythe, John Roberts and T. A. 
Sanford. Several years ago, Wisconsin sub- 
sidized the athletic insurance program in 
the amount of about $41,'0i00.000 in a given 



year. Currently, the State Association sub- 
sidizes this activity in amounts ranging 
from 65c to $1.25 for each individual. Iowa 
subsidizes this division in the amount of 
$1.00 for each individual policy. Until the 
last couple of years, the Michigan Associa- 
tion had a surplus at the end of each year 
which permitted them to honor special cases 
which were not included in the regular 
schedule. For the last couple of years, the 
claims have been such that the surplus was 
negligible and it has not been possible to ex- 
pand the coverage to include unscheduled 
cases. In a few states, such as Florida and 
Georgia, the athletic benefit plan has been 
discontinued because of the feeling that ade- 
quate coverage is now available through regu- 
lar insurance company channels. The cost to 
schools is somewhat higher than when the 
State Association sponsored the program but 
the tendency was in the direction of making 
greater claims each year because of the feel- 
ing that the insurance division is impersonal 
and "fair game" even when operated by the 
group of schools as a unit. 

Attention was called to a number of the 
efforts in the direction of reducing injuries. 
Many of these efforts have been sponsored 
through the Football Safety Committee. The 
opinion was expressed that there have been 
some good results and that these projects 
are tangible evidence of good things which 
can be accomplished through directing atten- 
tion to avoidable injuries and the need for 
adequate care of those which are unavoid- 
able. 

The National Federation Track and Field 
Rules and Records Committee met on Wed- 
nesday morning, June 26. Because a great 
many others were interested in the activity 
of this committee, the meeting was in the 
nature of "open house." Approximately 60 
men sat in with the committee. 

Federation representatives on the Joint 
Baseball Committee participated in a bene- 
ficial meeting on Thursday morning and 
topics of general interest were discussed. 
The primary purpose of the meeting was to 
keep interest in the project alive. It was the 
opinion of the group that these activities are 
proceeding in a satisfactory way and that 
no controversial movement exists at the 
present time. Report of this committee was 
made at the Friday afternoon session. 

Session for Board Members 

The Wednesday afternoon session was 
made up of two divisions which ran concur- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1957 



Page Thirteen 



rently, with State Association Executive Of- 
ficers in one group and members of State 
Association Boards of Control in the other. 
Both sessions convened at 2:00 P. M. and 
continued to 5:30 P. M. 

The Board of Control session was called 
to order by Board Member H. D. Williams 
(Idaho), member of the Federation Execu- 
tive Committee. Presiding duties were divid- 
ed between Mr. Williams, President V. E. 
Dozier (Florida) and President V. F. God- 
dard (Tennessee). 

An interestinig- presentation concerninig 
Association finances was presented by Presi- 
dent R. C. Hall (Washington) and Jack Daw- 
son (Kentucky). Mr. Hall called attention to 
ways in which Associations are financed. A 
few such as Florida and Wyoming place 
great dependence on dues paid by member 
schools. Some, such as Oklahoma, Montana 
and Oregon, receive some income from foot- 
ball play-offs. The California Federation is 
partially supported by the athletic insurance 
program. Some states, such as Tennessee, 
Illinois, Kentucky and Ohio have a sizeable 
surplus which returns interest. Iowa owns 
a headquarters building from which there 
are some rental returns. Minnesota receives 
some financial help from a profitable hockey 
tournament. For a majority of the Associa- 
tions, great dependence is placed on receipts 
from basketball tournaments. 

Mr. Dawson, who has had much experience 
as a State Association Board of Control mem- 
ber, called attention to the many services 
which can be rendered if Association funds 
are available. In some states, basketball tour- 
nament receipts are great enough so that an 
appreciable sum of money may be returned 
to each member school at the end of the 
year. This is a direct bonus or dividend. 
States such as Illinois and Indiana are among 
those which choose to make a direct contibu- 
tion to each member school athletic depart- 
ment. In other states, the State Association 
receipts merely balance the needs for ad- 
ministering the affairs of the Association. 
In some, there is an appreciable income and 
the member schools have expressed a desire 
to have the excess funds used for expanded 
services. In some, the athletic accident insur- 
ance program is subsidized so that the cost 
of such insurance to member schools is 
quite low. In some, a scholarship fund to 
assist worthy high school students in secur- 
ing a training in physical and athletic educa- 



tion is available. In a few, receipts from the 
basketball tournaments are partially used in 
defraying part or all of the travel expense 
incurred in connection with non-paying 
sports such as track, tennis and golf. In 
some, part of the funds have been used to 
build or buy a headquarters building to 
eliminate payment of rent. State Association 
staffs have been increased to more adequate- 
ly administer services of all kinds to member 
schools. There is a marked trend in the direc- 
tion of using some of these funds as a type 
of endowment or working fund which will 
cover part of the running expenses of the 
Association. The size of the working fund 
has undergone a change over the past several 
years. In most states, it is recognized that 
a surplus of a few thousand dollars is no 
longer adequate. In general, the amount ac- 
cumulated in the State Association surplus 
ranges from an amount which would cover 
all necessary running expenses of the Asso- 
ciation for a period of one year to an amount 
which may reasonably be expected to provide 
an income in interest and dividends of from 
$5,000.00 to $10,000.00 per year. In all cases, 
it is recognized that an Association with ade- 
quate funds is more stable and more highly 
respected because of the tangible services 
which can be rendered. Adequate funds also 
contribute to the building of an efficient 
State Association office staff. In all of these 
matters, it is essential that those who have 
the reponsibility of administering the funds 
use good judgment in preventing wasteful 
practices and in authorizing only those ex- 
penditures which will meet with the approval 
of member schools. 



FOOTBALL QUESTIONS 

(Contmued from Page One) 

he commits an additional foul which makes it a 
multiple foul. 

18. Play: On a forward pass play, ineligible 
Al advances beyond nputral zone and Umpire 
throws a foul marker. The pass ends behind the 
line. What is the proper procedure ? 

Ruling: Some Officials refer to this as "eating 
the marker." It is not greatly different from sim- 
ilar situations. Sometimes a touchdown signal must 
be retracted because there was a foul. There might 
be use of hands after ball has become dead under 
circumstances in which Official is not certain ball 
was dead. Use of hands during the dead ball is not 
a foul so the throwing of the marker would have to 
be canceled. There is no signal which is entirely sat- 
isfactory for canceling use of marker. Probably the 
one which comes the closest is the declined penalty 
signal. 

19. Play: May a safety be declined? 



Page Fourteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1957 



Ruling: If the safety is the result of legal play, 
no foul has been committed and there is no penalty 
to decline. If the safety would result from enforcing 
a penalty, then the penalty may be declined just as 
a penalty for any single foul may be declined. 

20. Play: Al requests privilege: (a) of tying 
his shoulder lace pad; or (b) replacing broken 
shoulder pad lace. 

Ruling: Referee will order clock stopped. In (a), 
if Al or A2 on the field or an Official ties the lace 
without appreciable delay, the Referee will charge 
the time-out to himself. In (b), the replacement or 
repair of the broken shoulder pad lace will normally 
necessitate the assistance of an attendant, coach or 
someone from the bench. Therefore, the Referee 
will charge the time-out to team A. In both situa- 
tions, clock starts -when ball is placed ready-for-play. 

21. Play: Al advances across B's goal line. After 
ball becomes dead, A3 commits personal foul. A2 is 
offside. 

Ruling: Not a multiple foul. Acceptance for 
offside penalty is automatic. Both fouls penalized. 
Total loss of yards will be 5 yards plus 15 yards. 

22. Play: If the kickers commit fair catch in- 
terference, does this always give R the right to ad- 
vance after catching kick? 

Ruling: Not unless the interference is caused 
by a kicker touching the kick. 

23. Play: Since penalty for a flying block or 
tackle has been eliminated, does the last sentence 
of Rule 10-5-2 sei^e any useful pui-pose? 

Ruling: This sentence could probably be elimi- 
nated except for the unusual case where there 
might be a foul by a non-player during a i-unning 
play in which the ball becomes dead in the end 
zone. If such foul has a penalty of 5 yards, measure- 
ment could leave the ball in the end zone. 



24. Play: What is the relationship of the terms 
enforcement, administration, acceptance, declination 
and measurement? 

Ruling: The term "enforcement" is usually 
synonomous with "administration." When Official 
enforces a penalty, he arranges for possible "ac- 
ceptance" or "declination" and for "measurement." 
The tei-m "measui-ement" implies acceptance of 
penalty. In the Federation code, all penalties involve 
distance of 5 or 15 yards. Hence, the term "measure- 
ment" covers all cases in which a penalty is accept- 
ed and the term is so used in the current edition 
of the rules. 

25. Play: If the second scrimmage-kick occurs 
after K has recovered their first kick behind the 
line, is this a retui'n-kick ? 

Ruling: This is not a return-kick unless there 
is a change of team possession. The next down is 
not always first unless the kick has been touched 
beyond the line by R. 

26. Play: In the Football Meeting Folder, Ques- 
tion 6 is a thought provoker which is a "little 
catchy." What factor makes the listed answer in- 
correct ? 

Ruling: The listed choices are correct as given 
but the choice is made by team A instead of team B. 

27. Play: In the 6-Man game, should the kick-off 
after safety be from the 15 yardline or from the 
30 yardline and may a field goal be scored by such 
kick? 

Ruling: Such kick should be made from the 30. 
It is not possible to score a field goal from the kick. 

28. Play: When and where will the National 
Federation Football Committee meet in 1958 ? 

Ruling: At the Phoenix Hotel in Lexington, 
Kentucky on Monday and Tuesday, January 6 and 7. 



REPORT OF INSURANCE CLAIMS 

(Continued from August Issue of the Kentucky High School Athlete) 



Injury Amount Paid 

Laceration — suture 4.00 

Bill Basham X-ray (knee) 10.00 

-Don Wilkerson Laceration — suture 5.00 

-Jerry Lax X-ray (rib) 10.00 

-Roy Bryant X-ray (chest) 6.00 

-S. W. Stamper X-ray (spine) 10.00 

-Gene Hipp X-ray (foot) 12.00 

-Allen Tilley Fractured metatarsal 20.00 

-Bill Presson X-ray (chest) 6.00 

-Benny Green X-ray (ankle) 12.00 

-Richard Roberts X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

-Charles Evans Fractured metacarpal & finger 25.00 

-Tommy Timmons X-ray (finger) 5.00 

-Kenneth Hurley X-ray (hand) 6.00 

-Robert Feezor X-ray (foot) 5.00 

-Charlie Osborne X-ray (hand) 5.00 

-Benny Green X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

-Otis Dinning, .Tr. X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

-Gene Hipp X-ray (finger) 6.00 

-Bill Basham X-ray (rib & wrist) 20.00 

-Wayne Huff Leg injury (special) 150.00 

-David Rudd X-ray (finger) 10.00 

nt Lick Harold D. Hunt Head injury (special) 36.75 

Paint Lick Rill S. West Broken nose. X-ray 30.00 

Paintsville Ralph Houston Broken tooth 20.00 

Park City David Denton Broken tooth. X-ray 24.00 

Park City Bobby Carey Broken tooth. X-ray 22.00 

Park City Billy Minyard Broken tooth. X-ray 23.00 

Phelps :— Dickie Skeens X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Pine Knot Charles Thomas X-ray (thumb) 6.00 

Pineville Danny Haley X-ray (elbow) 6.00 

Pineville Henry Howard X-ray (ribs) 10.00 

Pineville David Hendrickson Broken finger 8.00 

Prestonsburg Tames Crager Loss of tooth 25.00 

Prestonsburg Toe ITack Harris X-ray (spine) 20.00 

Prestonsburg Tames Buford Crager X-ray (knee) 11.00 



School Claimant 

Paducah Tilghman Kenneth Brooksh: 

Paducah Tilgh: 
Paducah Tilgh 
Paducah Tilgh: 
Paducah Tilgh: 
Paducah Tilgh: 
Paducah Tilgh: 
Paducah Tilgh 
Paducah Tilghr 
Paducah Tilghr 
Paducah Tilghr 
Paducah Tilghr 
Paducah Tilghr 
Paducah Tilghr 
Paducah Tilghr 
Paducah Tilgh 
Paducah Tilgh 
Paducah Tilgh 
Paducah Tilgh 
Paducah Tilgh 
Paducah Tilgh 
Paducah Tilgh 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1957 Page Fifteen 

Prestonsburg James Crager X-ray (knee) 11.00 

Prestonsburg Paul Phillip Hughes Wrist injury (special 57.50 

Prestonsburg Wayne Dixon X-ray (shoulder) 15.00 

Richardsville Harold Embry, Jr. X-ray (skull) 5.00 

Rineyville Raymond Nail Laceration — suture 6.00 

Rineyville Donnie Lewis X-ray (chest) 10.00 

Rineyville David Dowell Loss of tooth (X-ray) 27.00 

Rineyville James Welch X-ray (spine) 15.00 

Rockhold Ewell T. Cobb X-ray (ankle) 12.00 

Rockhold Frankin Alsip Broken nose 20.00 

Russell County Brentley Bernard X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Russell County Bobby L. Skaggs X-ray (back) 10.00 

Russell County Carlie Roy Head injury (special) 22.60 

Russell County Rupert Keith X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Russellville Berks Brown Fractured clavicle 35.00 

Russellville Gish Arnold Dislocated elbow, X-ray 37.00 

Russellville James E. Miller Back injury (special) 22.50 

Russellville Donald Monroe Ankle injury (special) 43.00 

Russellville John Guion Dislocated knee 20.00 

Russellville Jim Daniel X-ray (hand & arm) 18.00 

Russellville Don Monroe Chipped tooth 3.00 

Russellville Howard Taylor Head injury (special) 35.35 

Russellville Howard Taylor X-ray (back) 20.00 

St. Agatha Richard Nunan X-ray (finger) 6.00 

St. Agatha Robert Aldridge Fractured clavicle, laceration — suture 40.00 

St. Agatha Charles Butcher Dental injury (special) 82.50 

St. Mary (Alexandria) James Kelley Laceration — suture. X-ray 20.00 

St. Mary's (Paducah) .Terry Vance Laceration — suture 5 00 

St. Vincent Samuel Hosbach Wrist injury (special) 44.48 

St. Vincent Timmy Phipps Knee injury (special) 33.00 

Salem Duke Ramage Ankle injury (special) 72.50 

Salem Roe Vaughn Broken finger 10.00 

Salyersville A. B. Conley X-ray (knee) 10.00 

Scottsville Jimmie Rippy X-ray (chest) 10.00 

Scottsville Jerry Wimpee X-ray (ankle) G.OO 

Shelbyville John Molitor X-ray (arm) 12.00 

Shelbyville Frank Longley Laceration — suture 5.00 

Shelbyville Robert Marshall X-ray (shoulder) 7.50 

Shelbyville .Tames Landers Fractured tibia 41.00 

Shelbyville Donnie Swigert X-ray (pelvis) 10.00 

Shelbyville Otto Ryan X-ray (arm) 10.00 

Shelbyville Wyman Giles X-ray (chest) 10.00 

Shelbyville Bill Ellis X-ray (knee & arm) 20.00 

Shelbyville Jimmy Kit Long Dislocated knee 35.00 

Shelbyville Orris Johnson Dislocated shoulder 29.00 

Shelbjrville Bobby Arnold Arm injury (special) 16.00 

Shelbyville Bill Ellis Head injury (special) 34.50 

Shelbyville Bobby Aldridge Fractured tibia 60.00 

Shelbyville Buddy Marshall X-ray (back) 20.00 

Shelbyville Donnie Swigert Leg injury (special) 50.00 

Shelbyville Donnie Swigert Broken tooth. X-ray 24.00 

Shepherdsville Harold Sipes Back injury (special) 24.10 

Somerset Bob Waddle X-ray (elbow) 7.50 

Somerset Allen Mitchell Dental injury (special) 42.00 

Somerset Gene Branscum Dental injury (special) 44.50 

Somerset Ed McKenny X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Somerset Jim Doulton Leg injury (special) 132.90 

Somerset Danny wTasper X-ray (shoulder) 7.50 

Somerset Larry Dick X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Somerset William Coffey X-ray (ankle) 5.00 

Somerset -Terald Monds X-ray (hand) 6.00 

Somerset Tommy Adams X-ray (hand) 7.60 

Somerset Wilson Sears X-ray (hand) 7.60 

Somerset Ed Cook Fractured ulna 20.00 

Sonora Bill Koutt X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

Sonora -Tesse Marvin Walters Knee injury (special) 150.00 

South Marshall Darrell Morgan X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

South Marshall Darrell Morgan Fractured radius 40.00 

South Marshall Harold Wilkins X-ray (foot) 5.00 

South Marshall Edward Max Cole Chipped tooth. X-ray 5.00 

South Marshall Harold Dean York Chipped tooth. X-ray 5.00 

South Marshall Dwain Ross X-ray (hand) 6.00 

South Marshall .Jerry Ross Loss of teeth 35.00 

South Marshall Bobby Miller Head injury (special) 21.16 

Southern Ted Powers X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Southern Morris Longacre Laceration — suture 5.00 

Southern Donald Henson X-ray (wrist) 12.00 

Southern Lynn Griffin Broken tooth 5.00 

Southern Donald Henson Knee 'njury (special) 112.50 

Southern William Paschal Knee injury (special) 104.00 

Southern George McCarty Loss of teeth 62.50 

Southern Tom Paul Laceration — suture 5.00 

Southern Bill Showalter Laceration — suture 5.00 

Springfield Charles Havden Fractured clavicle 36.00 

Springfield Robert Kimherlin Laceration — suture 6.00 

Springfield Tom Moore X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Springfield Robert Kimberlin Chipped tooth 3.00 

Springfield Robert Kimberlin X-ray (hand) 8.00 

Springfield Tom Moore Laceration — suture 5.00 

Springfield Hal Barber X-ray (ankle) 10.00 

Springfield Frank Peters X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Springfield Michael Goatley Dislocated ankle, fractured radius 65.00 

Springfield John Boone X-ray (spine) 20.00 

Stanford Randall Paul Napier Broken nose 15.00 

Stanford Douglas Frisbie Fractured tibia & fibula 90.00 

Stinnett Settlement Richard Bailey X-ray (spine) 10.00 

Stinnett Settlement .John A. Wilson X-ray (foot) 5.00 

Sunfish Jerry A. Basham Dislocated hip 27.50 

Taylor CDunty Brent Cox X-ray (ankle) 7.60 



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Page Sixteen THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR SEPTEMBER, 1957 

Taylorsville Bobby Jones Laceration — suture 5.00 

Taylorsville David Houghlin Laceration — suture 5.00 

Taylorsville Donald Patterson Fractured metatarsal, X-ray 35.00 

Taylorsville Doyle Nichols X-ray (knee) 6.00 

Temple Hill Donald Nuckols Fractured tibia 50.00 

Tollesboro Harold Bryant Loss of teeth 50.00 

Tollesboro Leslie Tolle Dental injury (special) 93.00 

Tollesboro Davis Breeze Broken tooth 20.00 

Joe Petitt Knee injury (special) 17.00 

Charles Miller X-ray (leg) 12.00 

Joe Russell A.rm injury (special) 18.50 

Leon Denham Laceration — suture 5.00 

Carl Hartley X-ray (ankle) 4.00 

^Slmer Waller X-ray (knee) 8.00 

*^obby Fritz Head injury (special) 16.13 

Hollis Litchfield Broken teeth, X-ray 42.00 

Trigg County \lfred B. Cossey Broken tooth, X-ray 22.00 

Trigg County \lfred Cossey Broken nose 16.00 

Tyner Charles Turner Broken nose 10.00 

Tyner Ronald D. Carnenter X-ray (knee) 10.00 

Tyner Kenneth Davidson X-ray (ankle) 7.50 

Tyner Ta-nes Spence Fractured radius 35.00 

University \llcn Tolman X-ray (hip) 15.00 

Utica Tommy Westerfield Dental injury (special) 128.50 

Valley Frank Wallace X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Valley Robert Arnold X-ray (chest) 10.00 

Valley Dick Hawkes X-ray (chest) 10.00 

Valley David Holton Fractured fibula _: 50.00 

Valley Fergie Scheynost X-ray (leg) 6.00 

Valley Eugene Speer X-ray (foot) 10.00 

Valley Billy Seward X-ray (chest) 10.00 

Valley T.^rry Gritton Fractured metacarpal 26.00 

Valley Larry Gritton Dislocated finger 10.00 

Valley Bill Baker Laceration — suture S.Ort) 

Valley Tesse Henon X-ray (chest) 10.00 

Valley Carl Cooper _- Fractured pelvis 70.00 

Valley Haro'd Embry X-ray (hand) 6.00 

Valley Bill Beanblossom Dislocated shoulder 35.00 

Valley Fergie Scheynost X-ray (hand, wrist, arm & elbow) 12.00 

Valley Richard Hill X-ray (leg and knee) 8.00 

Valley Bill Seward Broken nose. X-ray 30.00 

Valley Buddy Ro'Jenberger X-ray (chest) 10.00 

Valley Krnny Baker X-ray (chest & leg) 16.00 

Valley Bobbv Grasch X-ray (foot) 6.00 

Valley Dav'd Holton X-ray (wrist & elbow) 12.00 

Valley Ruddy Rosenberger X-ray (skull) 10.00 

Valley Larry Gritton Dislocated elbow 13.50 

Valley B-ll Seward Reopened claim on nose injury (special) 89.00 

Valley Kenny Baker Dislocated shoulder 35.00 

Valley Randel Sharp Dislocated shoulder 35.00 

Valley Erwin Boone X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Valley Larry Gritton Fractured radius 40.00 

Valley Jess Ellis X-ray (neck) 10.00 

Valley Fonda Seward X-ray (shoulder) 10.00 

Valley Randall Walker X-ray (thigh & chest) 16.00 

Valley Bill ETiglish X-ray (elbow) 6.00 

Valley .Jesse Henon X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Valley Tames Crisp X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Versailles Tack Hilton X-ray (ankle) 5.00 

Versailles Bert Gilkerson Fractured carpal. X-ray 25.00 

Versailles Tames Berry Broken teeth 40.00 

Versailles Judson Strader X-rav (foot & anklel 2.00 

Vine Grove Bob Oldham Knee injury (special) 97.50 

Virgie Perry Brewer Loss of tooth. X-ray 29.00 

Warfield T)on Hall Leg injury (special) 150.00 

Warfield Tommy Jarrell X-ray (foot) 6.00 

Warren County Charley McDonald Nose injury (special) 36.50 

Warren County Harold .Jenkins X-ray (ankle) 6.00 

Warren County Kenneth Collins X-ray (arm) 6.00 

Wayne County Robert Cooper X-ray (wrist) 7.00 

Wayne County Jack Unchurch Eye injury (special) 56.08 

Wayne County Donald Dunagan X-ray (wrist) 10.00 

Wheelwright Chet Curry Loss of tooth. X-ray 29.00 

Wheelwright Jimmy Joe Hall X-ray (finger) 10.00 

Wheelwright Paul E. Campbell Fractured radius & ulna 65.00 

Whitesburg Steve Lee Morton Loss of teeth 50.00 

Whitesburg Donald R. Fields Fractured metacarpal 11.00 

Whitesburg Harold Ogelvie Laceration — suture 5.00 

Whitesburg Carlos Brown X-ray (shoulder) 6.00 

Whitesburg Sammy Blair Loss of teeth 50.00 

Whitesburg Carlos Fugate Leg injury (special) 15.00 

Williamsburg Marcus Yancey Knee injury (special) 150.00 

Williamstown Glen Caldwell X-ray (knee) 8.00 

Williamstown Layle Lonkard Laceration — suture 5.00 

Willisburg Donnie Noel X-ray (hand) 10.00 

Willisburg Larry Birch X-ray (knee) 10.00 

Willisburg Bobby Coulter X-ray (finger) 10.00 

Willisburg To>,„ q Lewis X-ray (foot) 10.00 

Winchester David Scott Dental injury (special) 65.00 

Woodbine Bobbv Sears X-ray (ankle) 10.90 

Wurtland Floyd Adkins X-ray (shoulder & spine) 20.00 

Wnrtland . .Jerry Fannin Dental injury (special) 35.00 

Official John H. Shaw X-ray (knee) 10.00 

Official Gordon Reed Replaced knocked-out filling. X-ray 24.00 



HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO. 



INCORPORATED 



103 PHONE 104 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



SERVICE 

IS OUR MIDDLE NAME 



Whether your order is for a few special items or for outfitting a complete 
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We try to make our SERVICE match the quality of the items we sell. 
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If you would like to see our salesman for either football or basketball 
supplies, call us at 103 or 104. 

ROY BOYD, HERBIE HUNT, JIM MITCHELL, BILL HUNT or C. A. 
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The Player . . 

1. He lives clean and plays hard. He plays for the love of the game. 

2. He wins without boasting, he loses without excuses, and he never quits. 

3. He respects officials and accepts their decisions without question. 

4. He never forgets that he represents his school. 

The Coach . . 

1. He inspires in his boys a love for the game and the desire to win. 

2. He teaches them that it is better to lose fairly than to win unfairly. 

3. He leads players and spectators to respect officials by setting them a 
good example. 

4. He is the type of man he wants his boys to be. 

The Official . . 

1. He knows the rules. 

2. He is fair and firm in all decisions. He calls them as he sees them. 

3. He treats players and coaches courteously and demands the same 
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4. He knows the game is for the boys, and lets them have the spotlight. 



7726 Spectator . . 



1. He never boos a player or official. 

2. He appreciates a good play, no matter who makes it. 

3. He knows the school gets the blame or the praise for his conduct. 

4. He recognizes the need for more sportsmen and fewer "sports." 




Omcial Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 
OCTOBER - 1957 



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The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL XX— NO. 3 



OCTOBER, 1957 



$1.00 Per Year 



Early Season Football Questions 

(b) above, team K was in possession even 
though the ball was loose. The other funda- 
mental is, assuming no foul occurs before a 
scrimmage-kick is touched beyond the line 
by R, such touching always ends the series, 
regardless of whether penalty for the foul 
which is thereafter committed is accepted or 
declined. 

34. Play: While having a foot on or outside 
the sideline, Rl signals for fair catch. During 
flight of ball, he is tackled by Kl. Ball then 
strikes Kl in back while Kl is also touching 
the sideline. Ball is recovered in field by R2. 

Ruling: Double foul. Down replayed. Rl 
committed foul by participating (giving 
fair catch signal) after having been out-of- 
bounds. Kl committed foul by illegally 
tackling a player other than runner. Kl also 
committed fair catch interference. Since 
fouls by K and R occurred during down, they 
constitute a double foul. 

35. Play: Does Case Book Plav 125A con- 
flict with Rule 3-5-la? 

Ruling: No. After excess time-out, clock 
starts when ball is ready but 125A situation 
is not an excess time-out. In the case cited, 
no penalty and time-out is not charged. 

36. Play: A team fails to participate in 
warm-up exercises three minute before be- 
ginning of half. Is there a penalty? 

Ruling: No specific penaltv is provided. At 
one time there was a demand for a specific 
penalty. This would have made the Official 
fully responsible for enforcing compliance 
with practice provision. The National Com- 
mittee felt better results would be secured by 
placing the responsibility for this safety 
measure on coach and school authorities. The 
only time Official would assess 15 yards for 
this would be in situation where he has been 
specifically instructed by a conference to 
order teams to be ready three minutes be- 
fore the beginning of a half. Failure to comply 
with an Official's order would be unsports- 
manlike. 

37. Play: Before ball becomes alive after 

(Continued on Page Nine) 



Editor's Note: These rulings do not set aside or 
modify any rule. They are interpretations on some 
of the early season situations which have been pre- 
sented. 

Installment II 

30. Play : If the interior lineman rule is in- 
fracted, should the signal for illegal proce- 
dure or delay of game be used? 

Ruling: This is classified as a false start. 
The signal is for illegal procedure. 

31. Play: Question 48, Football Exam Part 
I, indicates after free-kick has touched the 
ground, K may push or pull in attempting 
to get ball. Does this conflict with Case Book 
page 67? 

Ruling: The answer is correct as printed 
and is in accordance with the last sentence 
of Rule 9-1-2. K as well as R is entitled to 
keep the ball if they legally get possession 
of a freekick. Therefore, either may use his 
hands in an attempt to get at a loose ball. 

32. Play: Al inadvertently takes a 3-point 
stance with head and hands in neutral zone. 
Al adjusts by taking position on line. Bl 
immediately charges and makes contact. 
Should Al be penalized under internal line- 
man's restriction? 

Ruling: First position of Al is not "on the 
line." Therefore, he has not violated the in- 
ternal lineman restriction. His action may be 
a false start for other reasons, i.e., an act 
which simulates a charge at the snap. 

33. Play : 3rd on 50. Punt by Kl is touched 
beyond the line by Rl after which: (a) R2 
commits a foul and R3 recovers ; or (b) K2 
commits a foul and K3 recovers. 

Ruling: In (a), if K declines penalty, 1st 
down for R where recovered. If K accepts 
penalty, K's ball 15 yards in advance of the 
previous spot, 1st and 10. In (b), if R declines 
penalty, 1st down for K where recovered. If 
R accepts penalty, 1st and 10 for K, 15 yards 
behind previous spot. 

Comment: The rulings hinge on two fun- 
damentals. After any penalty is measured, 
ball belongs to team which was in possession 
at time the foul was committed. In (a) and 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1957 



OCTOBER, 1957 



VOL. XX— NO. 3 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1966-60), Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1957-61). Marion 

Directors — W. B. .Tones (1967-61) Somerset: W. H. Crowdus 
(1964-58). Franklin; Jack Dawson (1964-58), Louisville; 
Robert P. Forsythe (1955-59), Greenville; K. G. Gillaspie 
(1955-59), Georgetown; Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



Jrom the Commissioned s Dffi 



ice 



The Cross Country Run 

The K.H.S.A.A. is attempting- to set up five 
regional cross country meets, scheduled to be held 
on Saturday, November 2, 1957. The sites are Pa- 
ducah, Bowling Green, Louisville, Bellevue, and 
Berea. Entry blanks will be sent to the principals 
of all member schools who have indicated that they 
plan to sponsor cross country teams this year. The 
state cross country run is scheduled to be held in 
Lexington on November 16. With interest increasing 
in the event, two more regional meets have been set 
up for 1957 than were held in 1956. 
Falls Cities Clinics 

Secretary Claude Ricketts of the Palls Cities 
Basketball Officials Association has scheduled six 
rules clinics in areas where his group supplies many 
of the officials. These meetings have the approval 
of the K.H.S.A.A. The dates and sites of the climes 
are as follows: Henry Central High School, Thurs- 
day, October 24; Greensburg High School, Tues- 
day, October 29; Harrodsburg High School, Monday, 
November 4; Frankfort High School, Thursday, 
November 7; Lebanon High School, Wednesday, 
November 13; Shelbyville High School, Thursday, 
November 14. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled October 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Adams, Roy D., 302 Brunswick Rd., Louisville 7, Tw 56301, 

Tw 60177 
Almon, James H.. P. 0. Box 967. Lynch, Vi 85942 
Ashworth, Fred G., P. O. Box 391, Huntington. W. Va. 
Ball. Al, 306 Monroe St., So. Charleston. W. Va. 
Beck, C. Norman, 2588 Filson Ave., Louisville, Me 41737, 

Ju 23611. Ext. 381 
Betz, Dick. 250 Albany Rd.. Lexineton. 47394. 21640 
Black, Charles D., 223 S. Main. Barbourville. 193, 341 
Bond, Jack C, 596 Mitchell. Lexington. 2-4287. 6-2250, Ext. 196 
Brown, .John W.. 525 E. North Aspendale, Lexington, 5-6868, 

2-3212 or 2-0232 
Bryan, Louis C Jr., Hq. & Hq. Co., 187th Inf., Ft. Campbell, 

4638. 4476 
Burchett. Joe A., P. O. Box 202. Prestonsburg, Allen 4662 
Campbell, William C, Box 266-G-Rt. 2, Louisville 14, WA 19052, 

.TU 6S361 
Carter, Darrell, Tompkinsville. Hu 7-5418, Hu 7-6466 
Cason, .Toe D., Sr., 122 S. Main St.. Hopkinsville, 6-3478, 6-3393 
Chaput, Louis E.. 410 College St.. Elizabethtown, Ro 6-7069, 

Ro 6-4126 
Clark. Charles F.. P. O. Box 444, Holden, W. Va. 
Creasey, Fred, Sebree, Te 5-7854 



Grotty, Arnold. A. E. P. Co., Bluefield. W. Va. 

Crouch, Jack J., 463 Villa Dr., Evansville, Indiana, GR 64892 

Daniels, Robert, Prestonsburg. 7761 

Davis, Charlie, Benham, Vi 82093 

Dixie, Cornelius P., 608 So. Clay, Louisville, Ju 77680, 

Em 69561, Ext. 326 
Drake, Ralph R.. 61G Wherry Apts., Fort Campbell, GE 93895, 

Ft. Campbell 2680 
Fey, Allen. 123 Garden Way, Ft. Thomas, Hi 16288, Ki 11800, 

Ext. 1346 
Fitch, F. A.. 156 Wiison Ct., Huntington, W. Va. 
Foreman. Earl V., 1400 Silver St., New Albany, Ind., 43394 
Garrity, E. F., 106 Bradford St., Charleston. W. Va. 
Goebel, Bill. Jr.. P. O. Box 142, Prestonsburg, 2407 
Golden, Billy Joe, Lynch 
Goodwin. W. H.. 403 E. 6th, Lexington, 3-2716, Frankfort 

CA 77626 
Gorham, Robert J.. 174 St. -Tames. Lexington. 26610, 40503 
Graham, .Tames Edward, 2424 Adams, Ashland, Ea 4-8169 
Hagy, Harold J., 201 Lovell Dr., Charleston. W. Va. 
Hofstetter, Joe, Box 2173, Williamson, W. Va. 
Holstein. William, 42V, High Street, Logan. W. Va. 
Isaac. John K.. 705 Ellette Dr., Charleston. W. Va. 
Kimble. Frank, Box 2173. Williamson. W. Va.. 1870 
Lohr, Joel D., 3124 Redbud Lane, Louisville. Gl 83386. Tw 

63401, Ext. 226 
Manning. Louis. 383 Laurel Ave.. Ashland EA 47745, EA 49226 
McHenry. Louis P., 408y, Main. Hopkinsville, Tu 62601, 

Tu 62813 
Malcolm, Donald C. EFD 1, Kenova, W. Va. 
Marushi, Rudy. 651 Stratton St.. Logan. W. Va. 
Mayhugh. Robert Lee. Route 3. Elizabethtown, Rockwell 59298. 

Rockwell 56187 
Medaris, Oliver .T., Apt. 12-C. Wherry Apts.. Fort Campbell, 

GE 93219. Ft. Campbell 2954 
Moll, Charles Joseph, Jr., 1002 Ashland, Louisville, Emerson 

64496, Spring 82731, Ext. 270 
Moss. James W., 163 Bell Ct.. Lexington. 5-3636, 4-2015 
Mudd, Ed. 3512 Mildred, Louisville, Sp 6-6888 
Pence, William M.. 4900 Andalusia Lane. Valley Station, 

PI. Ridge 83781, Ft. Knox 3340 
Potter. Sam. Lynch. 2673. 2591 
Powell, Logan G., 1031 Oak Hill, Lexington, 29794, Georgetown 

1600 
Ray, Shirley G.. 3035 San Juan Dr., Owensboro. MU 37663, 

MU 34537 
Rentz, Thomas W., 335 Transylvania Park, Lexington, 41091, 

32880 
Robertson. Everett L., 341 Etna, Rnssell. Oak 328 
St. Charles, Thomas A.. 1409 Grandview Dr., Nashville. Tenn., 

Cy 29958, Al 56497 
Schelhase. David. 1630 Wedeking, Evan=iville. Indiana, HA 59790 
Schlich, Paul E., 3150 Talisman Rd., Louisville, Gl 86765, 

Tw 60211 
Schutz, .John ,T.. Jr.. Hickory Grove. New Albany. Ind., 46984 
Sheets, .Tames W.. 208 Louden Ave.. Lexington, 62234 
Shumate. Roy V.. P. O. Box 261, Benham, Viking 82538, 

Viking 86408 
Simms, Wavelan J., .Tr.. Co. B, Sp. Tng. Regt. USATCA, 

Fort Knox. 6033. 2648 
Sinclair, George H., 5120 Lammers Ln., Louisville. Wo 9-7925. 

Me 7-7621, Line 228 
Sledd. T.. 712 Poplar St.. Murray. 219. 740 - T.'-nt. ^ 
Soarks. Harry M.. 210 Woodlawn, Murray 1193-J, 740. Ext. 10 
Stone. Clifton. 2930 Oak Hill Rd., Evansville, Indiana, GR 60973 

HA 63311 
Troutman, Doyle C, Harlan. 1937. 522 

Van Meter. David G.. 3148 Talisman Rd.. Louisville, GL 44030 
Vennari, Paul, Box 13. Becklev. W. Va. 
Vinson. William .Tarrel. 325 Main St.. Ceredo. W. Va., 

Gl 31225. East 45660 
Watson. .Tohn T.. 1808 16th St., Huntington. W. Va.. .Ta 55398. 

Ja 69162 
Watts. Shirley. 654 Headley Ave.. Lexington. 4-»s.^;2. 2-6494 
Werkowitz, Jack, 4614 Miller Road, Blue Ash. Ohio, Sv 15382. 

Sy 15382 
Williamson. .Timmie. Box 741, Camp Knox Trailer Park, 

Camp LeJeune. N. C. 
Wilson. C. P. (Pete). 449 13th Ave.. Hnntinirton. W. Va. 
Wilson, .Tohn Pone. 812 Main St., Louisville, Tu 5-4591, Tw 60211 
Willis. Jim. P. O. Box 1332. Logan. W. Va. 
Wilson. Vern. 618 Stratton. Loean. W. Va. 

William. 3103 Wedgewood Wav, Louisville, 

Gl 44439, Gl 44439 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled October 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise desi^rnnted. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Adams, Roy D.. 302 Brunswick Rd., Louisville 7. Tw 56361, 

Tw 60177 
Adkins, Harvey Richard, Morehead State College. P. O. Box 

464, Morehead 
Adkins. Tom, Randy Hook. Re 86216. Re 86';15 
Allen, Jack, Bardstown, Fi 8-S294, Fi 8-3282 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1957 



Page Three 



Almon. James H., P. O. Box 967, Lynch, Vi 8-5942 
Almond, Alvm, 644 14th, Bowling Green, a4fi60, 34334 
Arnold, Marvin K., 3B6 McLeod, Madisonvule, Ta 14133, 

Ta laOlO 
Ashley, Kenneth, Eubank, 2604, 2611 
Bailey, Arville, Flat Gap, Cy 7-3945 (Bus. No.) 
BalUnger. Richard L., 820 E. Washington St., Louisville, 

Ju 70394 
Barnes. Judson, Bo.\ 127, Cawood, 1947-J, 472-J 
Barton, Walter W., Rt. 2, Box 12, Corbin, 1432M, 9144 
Bennett, Gene, Rt. 2, Wheeleisburg, Ohio, Scioto 970 L, 

Scioto 1078 R 
Best, Norris Gene, 5606 Walnut Way, Louisville 
Betz, Dick, 260 Albany Road. Lexington, 47394, 21640 
Bonner, William, Box 426, Vanceburg, 6-3401, 6-3351 
Bouisseau, Douglas, State St., Guthrie, Hu 3-2689, Hu 3-295.9 
Bowling, Roy, Route 1, Box 6, London, 309-J, 309-J 
Boyles, Paul E., Box 594, Russell, Park 892 
Branaman, Bill, Jr., 600 5th St., Corbin, 2457-J, 2288 
Braun, Robert "Bob", 27 Hollywood, Florence, At 3-5484, 

Re 1-6000 
Brown, Bryant, 631 Daviess St., Owensboro, Mu 3-2401, 

Ext. 273 (Bus. No.J 
Brown, E. C, Liberty, 4421, 4101 

Brown, Eddie W., 15 Bustetter Dr., Florence. At 3-5072 
Brown, J. Carlton, 411 O'Hara Drive, Danville, 1569J, 58 
Brown, John W., 526 E N. Asp. Lexington, 50858, 23212 
Browning. William Henry, Route 2, Lebanon 
Bryan, Louis C, Jr., Hq. & Hq. Co., 187th Inf., Ft. Campbell, 

4538, 4475 
Bunnell, Kenneth L., Munfordville, Ja 4-6464 
Burchett, Joe A., P. O. Box 202, Prestonsburg, Allen 4562 
Burchett, Lanier, 1007 Appen Ave., Columbia, Ful 4-2654, 

Ful 4-4111 
Burnett, Gerald T.. Union College, Barbourville 
Butts, Delbert L., 212 Mulberry, Carlisle, 144 
Caldwell, James, 65 Biehl, Newport, Co. 11786. Ex 69900, 

Ext. 2354 
Campbell, French, Garrett, 5521 
Campbell, William C, Box 266-G Rt. 2, Louisville 14, WA 19052, 

JU 53361 
Carpenter, Leonard, Salyersville 
Carpenter, William A., 1729 18th St., P. O. Box 12. Bowling 

Green, Vi 21263, Vi 21253 
Cartee. Ralph, Jr., Olive Hill, 4061 
Carroll, Joe E., Falcon 

Casteel, Ralph M., East Bernstadt, 904J, 906L 
Caudill, Gary A.. 227 High Street, Pikeville, 812-R 
Chandler, Tommy W., Dixon 
Chaput, Louis E., 410 College St., Elizabethtown. Ro 5-7069, 

Ro 6-4126 
Childs, Sherman, College Station, Murray. 2049 
Coffey. Kenneth B., Short St., Berea, 63-R, 880 
Coe, Jimmy, Burkesville, 11211, 91 
Cole, Lynn, Paducah, 3-2758, 3-6213 

Colgan, Donald L., 424 Mt. Carmel, Flemingsburg. 3671. 6511 
Combs, Roy B.. 1337 So. 1st, Louisville, Me 4-3374 
Correll, Elmer Eugene, 212 Vets Village. Richmond 
Cook, John, P. O. Box 255. Prestonsburg, Berea 9109 
Cooke, George W., P. O. Box 82, Morehead, 201 
Curry, Ellis, Bypro 

Day. Billy J., P. O. Box 53, West Liberty, SH 3-4177 
DeBoor, Matt, 215 Norway, Lexington, 6-3997, 3-0235 
Decker. William K., Main St., Paintsville, 1360, 866 
Denney, Billy L., 1420 Packard St., Ashland, East 48464 
Dial, Jack, 1230 26th St., Huntington, W. Va. 
Dorroh, Glenn U., Jr., 301 Clinton Rd., Lexington, 4-2234, 

2-3632 
Doyle, Donald, 302 Underwood, Campbellsville. 470 M. 231 
Drake. Richard R.. 61 Edwards Ct., Ft. Thomas, Hi 1-4235 
Dubrock. Donald M., 122 Southland Blvd., Apt. 2, Louisville, 

Em 77425 
Duncan, Earl, 10007 Taylorsville Rd., Jeffersontown. An 

71478, Tw 60177 
Fades, Jimmie, South Carrollton 
Earle, Herschel G.. Route 4, Cynthiana, S82-WI 
Early. Robert Gray, Bagdad, 6401 

Edmiston, Raymond Lee, 617 W. Arch, Madisonville, 1862-R 
Elliott, Carroll L., 106 Vertrees Ct.. Elizabethtown, Ro 52166, 

Ro 66118 
Elliott, Humphrey T., Liberty, 4291 

Ensslin, Charles William. No. Main St.. Barbourville, 185, 145 
Evans, James, Auxier, Prestonsburg 2072 
Fanning, Homer, 18 Bel Air, Winchester, 1696R, 2-2220, 

Ext. 2223 
Fields, Charles H., 100 Bennett Ct., Richmond, 1662-R 
Francis, Wendell Y.. 809 N. Race, Glasgow, Olive 1-5687, 

Olive 1-2136 
Frey, Bobby. State St.. Guthrie. Hu 32664 
Fritz, Sherman, Meadowlark Dr., Richmond, 2919 J, 1695 
Fugett, Karl F., 318 Vets Village, Richmond 
Fulkerson, Billy Bruce, Beech Creek 
Gardner, Daniel H., 104 S. Adams, Henderson, Ma 71297, 

Chrysler Corp. 
Garrett, Jack, 801 Center St., Corbin. 874-2, 15 
Gilbert, Gerald Leroy, Third St.. Vine Grove, 4950 (Bus. No.) 
Gilvin, Allie F.. 1657 Winchester, Cincinnati, Ohio, Be 1-6009, 

Be 1-8292 
Godsey, Garland D.. Box 181, Prestonsburg, 4541 
Griffith, Daryel, Mouth Card 



Gritton, Robert A., 443 W. Office, Harrodsburg, 963, 660 

Hackel, John C, Jr., 846 Linwood Ave., Louisville, Me 4-8730 

Hale, Don C, Box 127, Berea, 1063 

Haley, Dalton D., 230 W. College, Mayfield. 943-W 

Hall, Billy J., 151 Main St. % J. C. nowell. New madison, O. 

Hall, Bob, Box 444, Cumberland, 43 W 

Hampton, Wallace Ray, 730 Riciiaruson St., Clarksville, Tenn., 

Mi 74969, Mi 71873 
Hanes, Kd, 1508 Ridgecrest, Bowling Green, Vi 3-3432 
Hardin, Ben, Marrowbone, 6830 (bus. No.) 
Harmon, Hayes Kussell, P. O. Box la, Inez, 2771 
Harris, Joe D., Nebo, Ci 9-4441 

Harris, Thomas P., Jr., Route 1, Allensville, Co 5-2791, Co 6-2111 
Hayes, Douglas J ., McDowell 
Heldman, John Jr., 140 Seneca Trail, Louisville 14, EM 32181, 

Me 72531 
Hendren, Bill N., Route 2, Richmond, Kirk. 8244 
Henson, Tony C, Pryorsburg 
HewUng, Franklin C, llzd Orchard, Newport, Co 17380, 

Ga 13700 
Hill, Jimmie, Gausdale 

Highbaugh, Ottis, Bonnieville, Ja 44047 (Bus. No.) 
Hines, G. Cliff, 1113 Covington, Bowling Green, Vi 34810 
Hiten, John W., 722 Melrose Ave., Lexington, 48672, 22626 
Hoffman, Jack J., Box 455, Vine Grove, 4176 Ft. Knox 

(Bus. No.) 
Holbrook, Arthur, P. O. Box 103, Leatherwood 
Holt, Robert, Route 6, Hopkmsviile, 61738, 61207 
Hooks, Robert H., Wheelwright, 2121 (Bus. No.) 
Hull, David S., Hazard, 609, oo» 

Hubbs, Cletus L., Jr., Box 64, Sedalia, Fa 8-3453, Fa 8-3241 
Hummer, Irby, Hodgenvllle, El 8-3009, El 8-3000 
Hurst, Harold M., P. O. Box 178, Stanton, 4423, 4423 
Hutchinson, Jack, P. O. Bo.x 524, Martin, 3427, Prestonsburg 

7601 
Inman, Briscoe, Green Acres Danville, 3076, 1900, Ext. 26 
Irwin, Charlie, Route 4, Hopkinsville, Tu 58884, Tu 68884 
Jeter, John B., 1702 Versailles Road, Lexington, 4-9935, 2-8766 
Johnston, Edward E., 300 College, Paducah, 2-0216 
Jones, Elmon, East Bernstadt, London 40 (Bus. No.) 
Jordan, Ken, 104 W. Orchard Rd., Ft. Mitchell, Ed 1-2747, 

Ga 1-3100 
Kazee, Wiliam Wallace, 111 Maple Ave., Danville, 9156 
Keffer, Dick, 1485 Squires Dr., Louisville, Em 8-4618 
Kessinger, Hubert B.. Cadiz, La 2-8116, La 2-8676 
King, James A., 720 So. 43rd, Louisville 11, Sp 8-3690, Sp 6-2466 
King, Randall E., 119 S. Central, Campbellsville, 696W 
Kohlmeyer, Robert L., 1760 N. Alvord, Evansville, Ind., 

Gr 70600, Ha 34401 
Lance, Walter N., 2319 Maple St., Owensboro, Mu 33974, 

Mu 31591 
Landolt, Gene. 1002 Payne, Murray, 1685, 6 
Larson, Robert A., 309 Walnut, Springfield, 4117, 3601 
Ledford, James, Box 144, Crab Orchard 
Litteral, Ray, Morehead 

Lyon, Manuel R., 5077 Strathmore Dr., Cincinnati 27. Ohio 
Lyons, Harold M., Webster Ave., Cynthiana, 332-R, 99 
McBee. William K., Burlington, 342, Wal. 93 
McClellan, Leonard B., 2512 (Joldsmith Lane, Louisville, 

Gl 8-2598, .Ju 7-9111 
McGlasson. Galen, Route 1, Burlington, 3342. 3342 
McGuffey, Harold B., Smiths Grove, Vi 2-5090, 77 
McHenry, Louis P., 408i/, Main, Hopkinsville, Tu 62601, 

Tu 62813 
McLeod, Robert N., Jr., Somerset, 571, 646 

Mahan, Boyd W., 8 Circle Drive, Florence, At 33336, Lo 18686 
Martin. Charlie, Box 63, Sharpsburg 
Martin. Howard 1.. 403 N. 16th. Murray 
Marushi, Rudy, 651 Stratton St., Logan, W. Va. 
Masters. Kaman Jackson, P. O. Box 1226, College Station. 

Berea, 9128 
Mayes, Edward, 838 Crossbill Rd., Danville, 986R, 1008 
Meade. Foster "Sid", Box 63, South Portsmouth, Fl 2-1391, 

Fl 2-1311 
Meadows, Marvin Ray, Clavhole. N O 6-5057 
Metcalf, Earl L., 3441 Lovelaceville Rd., Paducah, 2-1369 
Mikez. Joseph A.. 412 N. 8th St., Murray, 1887 W 
Miller. Lonnie. Laurelville, Ohio, 2021 (Bus. No.) 
Miller, Roy J., 644 Whitcomb, Clarksville, Ind., Bu 3-6335, 

Em 1-4140 
Miller, Roy L., Eelton. GR 6-2666 
Miller, Victor Leon, West Irvine, 268-R 
Miller, William L., Belton 
Mills, Claude. 861 S. Byinker, Columbus, Ohio. Br 93397, 

Br 90646 
Moody, Arthur L., 1320 Miles Lane, Louisville, Wo 9-6100 
Moore, Joe W., McRoberts 
Moll, Charles Joseph, Jr.. 1002 Ashland, Louisville, Emerson 

64496, Spring 82731, Ext. 270 
Moss, Bobby G., Box 373. La Center. 5-6445. 5-8081 
Mudd. Ed, 3512 Mildred, Louisville, Sp 6-6888 
Mullins, Arthur, Elkhorn City, 4151, 3401 
Neal, Marion, 2215 8th St., Portsmouth, Ohio, El 3-3948, 

El 3-4401 
Newsom, Marley, 109 Division St., Pikeville, 866R 
Nie. Allen Frank. 1031 Isabella. Newport, Ax 16847 
Noel, Paul W., Midway, Th 6-4101 

Oldham, Charles M., 134 Washington St., Hartford, 5 (Bus No.) 
Oldham, .Tohn H., Prospect, Ca 8-1698, Tw 3-3636 
Oney, Leo T., Jr., 603 Perry St., Greenup, 162 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1957 



Padgett, B. K., 117 Griffin Ave.. Somerset, 470W, 12 

Patrick, Don, 2223 Ohio Ave., Cincinnati 19. Oliio, Ga 13273, 

Ma 143UU, No. 368 
Patrick. Kalph. Salyersville, Fl 9-4121. Ashland Ea 4-1641 
Patterson. Paul G.. Lothair. 550, 350 
Pearson. Bobby Neal. Beechcreelt 
Penrod. «Joe B., 1115 W. 3rd. Owensboro. 35068 
PeteU, frank JVl.. 418 E. 13tn St., Bowling Green 
Polston. Billy. Bow. 145 (Bus. No.) 
Porter. David. Stevens Hali. Union College. Barbourville, 

North 1003 
Powell, Logan G., 1031 Oak Hill, Le-xington, 29794, George- 
town 1600 
Price, Jimmy Hart, Route 2, Waynesburg 
Pursiful, Darrell, Four Mile, Ed 729»3 

Quigg, Ben F., IV, Third St., Livermore. BR 82247. MU 32401 
Ray, Shirley G., 3035 San Juan Dr., Owensboro, Mu 37653, 

Mu 34537 
Ricketts, C. O., 10217 Starlight Way, Valley Station, Warwick 

1-9583, Melrose 4-1551, Ext. 220 
Rison, Johnny B., Bo.x 148, Irvine, 276-R, 111 
Rush, Jim T., South Main St., Tompkinsville, Hud 76541 
Rush, Ralph, Lida, London 
Salchli, Stanley W., 105 Aspen Ave., Frankfort. Ca 3-8420, 

Ca 3-3350 
Sallee, Charles M., Singer Optical Co., Bo.x 57, Evansville. Ind. 

Ha 28526. Ha 31179 
Schlich. Paul E., 3150 Talisman Rd., Louisville, Gl 86765, 

Tw 60211 
Scott, Emmanuel H., 706 W. 8th St., Cincinnati 3, Ohio 

DU 16468, Mo 18068 
Settle, Evan E., Jr., 102 Alton Rd., Shelbyville, 661-W, 142 
Solomon, Jim, 406 E. 8th, Benton, LA 72731. LA 76921 
Spiceland, S. E., 306 So. 13th, Murray, 852 
Stacy, Richie M., West Liberty, Sh 34685 (Bus. No.) 
Stamper, Paul, West Liberty, Sh 34325, Sh 34675 
Stanley, Haskell, Rt. 1, Pikeville 

Stephens, Robert J., Bo.x 629, Montgomery, W. Va. 
Stokes, Jim W., 737 E. Powell, Evansville. Ind., Ha 2-6004 
Sumner, Harold Carl, 1856 Heaton Rd, Louisville, FM 83647, 

Wh 48585 
Surface, William E., Sports Dept., Courier Journal, Louisville. 

SP 45593, Ju 52211, Ext. 488 
Taylor, Carl L., Clarksville, Tenn., Mid 5-9914 
Tate, Harold D., R. R. 5, Richmond, Ford 4503, Ford 4503 
Taylor, Hal, 9802 Orlandi Ct., Jeffersontown, An 76764 
Thurman. A. Earl. 3025 So. Allen. Owensboro, Mu 3-9683, 

Ro 4-5151 
Troutman, Doyle C, Harlan, 1937, 522 
Varble, William, 1705 Cypress, Louisville, SP 66712, SP 23621 

- Demur Dept. 
Vandergriff, Gene, 1307 Park Ave., Paducah, 5-5752, 2-2768 
Van Sant, William E., 101 Holaday Lane. Lakeside Park, 

S. Ft. Mitchell, Di 16087 
Walls, Harry B., 1310 Walter Ave., Louisville, EM 63454, 

Me 73611 
Warner, Marvin, Nancy 
Webb. Alvin B., Whitesburg, 2606 
Wilcox, Ursal E., Auxier, 4411 

Wilder, Murris. P. O. Box 302, Cumberland, 349 J, 73 
Williams, Donald, Route 2. Waltersville, Irvine 276-R, Irvine 106 
Willis. Jim, P. O. Box 1332, Logan, W. Va. 
Willis, Robert A.. 2916 W. Walnut St., Louisville, SP 81391, 

JU 62261, Ext. 282-283 
Wingfield, Felix. 1134 Eastern Pkwy., Louisville 17, Me 5-2751, 

01 8-3766 
Wise, Billy V.. 363 N. Broadway. Lexington. 2-0731, 2-5494 
Wise. Jack, 363 N. Broadway, Lexington, 20731. 42431 
Wood, Kenneth C, 118 Maryland Ave., Frankfort, Ca 3-0244, 

Ca 3-8261 
Wray, Darrel, Water Valley 
Wright, H. W., Jr., 719 Cedar Grove Ct., Louisville, Sp 2-3232, 

Ju 7-1161, Ext. 413-414 
Young, Billy Joe, 515 Coronado Ct., Paducah. 5-6382 



Attention! 

Principals and coaches will please notify their 
pep club and cheerleader sponsors that they are 
invited to attend the Sponsors Luncheon, to be held 
in the Student Union Football Room immediately 
after the morning session of the Cheerleaders Clinic 
on November 2. Service will be cafeteria style, and 
those attending may make any choice as to menu 
which they desire. Those who have not joined the 
KAPOS (Kentucky Association of Pep Organization 
Sponsors) and wish to do so may send the member- 
ship fee of $1.00 to Mrs. Stella Gilb, College of Edu- 
cation, University of Kentucky, or may join on 
November 2. 



Nineteen Miles Up 

Being "high" or "up in the air" connotes 
physical or mental confusion but being 19 
miles up has been popularized by a recent 
performance of a space biologist who hitched 
himself to a pressurized capsule and ascended 
for a "ringside view of the heavens". His 
service to his ultra-modern profession is 
appreciable. 

The school athletic profession could profit 
from an eagle's eye view which would encom- 
pass an expanded horizon so that the forest 
would not be obscured by individual trees. 
Contemplation in an area where the stars 
do not twinkle and the sky is purple-black 
might be beneficial. An athletic administra- 
tor in a local system or at the state or na- 
tional level finds it necessary to weigh each 
decision in its relation to the effect on the 
entire program rather than to base it on the 
effect on the individual or specific event. 
Certain boys who are 21 years of age might 
provide even competition with younger ath- 
letes but attempts to base the privilege on 
individual cases is not practical. Ditto for 
the right of the team to participate in un- 
limited travel or the right to extend the sea- 
son to include the entire calendar year or 
the right of non-staff members to coach 
the team or the right of a coach to recruit 
athletes. A good athletic administrator is 
trained to subordinate the individual case to 
the long-run effect on all of those who may 
be affected. 

Courts of Law, being composed of 
human beings, most of whom are not spec- 
ialists in the school athletic field, are seldom 
fully acquainted with the possible effect of 
an athletic decision on the whole school or 
the whole group of schools. The view from 
"19 miles up" is not possible in the short 
time which can be devoted to any one request 
for an injunction to hinder the activity of a 
governing athletic body. As a result, the 
forest is obscured by the trees. Sympathy 
for those nearest at hand rather than for 
the welfare of the entire group which may be 
affected is often a determining factor. 

The athletic administrator who on the 
local level, allows a rule to be set aside 
because of alleged extenuating circumstances 
or, on the state level, distorts a general rule 
in an attempt to fit a specific case, seldom 
accomplishes the intended purpose. 

It is not always easy to rule by law but 
the end result is good. — National Federation. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1957 



Page Five 



Member Schools of the K. H. S.A.A. 



The foIlowinK schools are 
School Athletic Association for 
Principals of member schools 
to see if the names of schools 
games are included. This list 
printer on October 1. A suppb 
joining in October will appeal 
magazine. 

Adair County 

(Columbia) 
Adairville 
Ahrens Trade 

(Louisville) 
Albany Independent 
Allen County 

(Scottsville) 
Almo 
Anderson 

(Law^renceburg) 
Annville Institute 
Ashland 
Athens 

(Lexington) 
Attucks 

(Hopkinsville) 
Auburn 
Aug'usta 
Austin Tracy 

(Lucas) 
Bagdad 
Bald Knob 

(Frankfort) 
Ballard Memorial 

(Barlow) 
Barbourvllle 
Bardstown 
Bardstown Training 
Bate 

(Danville) 
Beaver Dam 
Beechwood 

(So. Ft. Mitchell) 
Belfry 
Bell County 

(Pineville) 
Bellevue 
Benham 
Benton 
Berea 

Betsy Layne 
Black Star 

(Alva) 
Blaine 
Bloomfield 
Boone County 

(Florence) 
Bourbon County 

(Paris) 
Bowling Green 
Boyd County 

(Ashland) 
Bi'acken County 

(Brooksville) 
Breathitt 

(Jackson) 
Breckinridge County 

(Hardinsburg) 
Breckinridge Training 

(Morehead) 
Bremen 



members of the Kentucky High 
the year ending .June 30, 1958. 
should check this list carefully 
with which they have scheduled 
was compiled and sent to the 
imentary list of member schools 
• in the November issue of the 

Bridgeport 

(Frankfort) 
Bristow 
Brodhead 
Brownsville 
Buckeye 

(Lancaster) 
Buckhorn 
Bunche 

(Glasgow) 
Burgin 
Bush 

(Lida) 
Butler 
Butler 

(Louisville) 
Butler County 

(Morgantown) 
Caldwell County 

(Princeton) 
Calhoun 
Campbell County 

(Alexandria) 
Campbellsville 
Camargo 

(Mt. Sterling) 
Camp Dick Robinson 

(Lancaster) 
Caneyville 
Carlisle 
Carr Creek 
Carrollton 
CatlettS'buvg 
Caverna 

(Cave City) 
Centertown 
Central 

(Clinton) 
Central 

(Louisville) 
Central City 
Chandler's Chapel 

(Auburn) 
Clark County 

(Winchester) 
Clay 
Clay County 

(Manchester) 
Clifty 
College 

(Bowling Green) 
Corbin 
Cordia 

(Hazard) 
Covington Catholic 
Crab Orchard 
Crittenden County 

(Marion) 
Crofton 
Cuba 

(Mayfield) 
Cub Run 



Cumbei'land 
Cumberland County 

(Burkesville) 
Cynthiana 
Dalton 
Danville 
Daviess County 

(Owensboro) 
Dawson Springs 
Dayton 
Deming 

(Mt. Olivet) 
DeSales 

(Louisville) 
Dixie Heights 

(So. Ft. Mitchell) 
Dixon 
Dorton 
Dotson 

(Princeton) 
Douglass 

(Lexington) 
Douglass 

(Murray) 
Drakesboro 

Drakesboro Community 
DuBois 

(Mt. Sterling) 
Dunbar 

(Mayfield) 
Dunham 

(Jenkins) 
duPont Manual 

(Louisville) 
Durham 

( Campbells ville) 
Durrett 

(Louisville) 
East Benham 

(Benham) 
Eastern 

(Middletown) 
Earling-ton 
East Main Street 

(Lynch) 
Elizabethtown 
Elizabethtown Catholic 
Elkhorn 

(Frankfort) 
Elkhorn City 
Eminence 
Erie 

(Olive Hill) 
Estill County 

(Irvine) 
Eubank 
Evarts 
Ezel 

Falmouth 
Fancy Farm 
Farmington 
Ferguson 
Fern Creek 
Flaget 

(Louisville) 
Flaherty 

(Vine Grove) 



Flat Gap 
Fleming County 

(Flemingsburg) 
Fleming'-Neon 

(Fleming) 
Fordsville 
Forkland 

(Gravel Switch) 
Ft. Knox 
Frankfort 
Franklin-Simpson 

(Franklin) 
Frederick Fraize 
(Cloverport) 
Fredericktown 

(Springfield) 
Fredonia 
Fulgham 

(Clinton) 
Fulton 
Fulton County 

(Hickman) 
Gallatin County 

(Warsaw) 
Gamaliel 
Garth 

(Georgetown) 
Garrett 
Glasgow 
Glendale 
Graham 
Grant County 

(Dry Ridge) 
Greensburg 
Greenup 
Greenville 
Guthrie 
Haldeman 
Hall 

(Grays Knob) 
Hanson 
Harrison County 

(Cynthiana) 
Hartford 
Harlan 
Harrodsburg 
Hazard 
Hazel 

Hazel Green Academy 
Hazel Green 

(East Bernstadt) 
Heath 

(West Paducah) 
Hellier 
Henderson 
Henderson County 

(Henderson) 
Henderson Settlement 

(Frakes) 
Henry Central 

(New Castle) 
Henry Clay 

(Lexington) 
Highlands 

(Ft. Thomas) 
High Street 

(Bawling Green) 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1957 



Hindman 

Hiseville 

Hitchins 

Hodg'enville 

Holmes 

(Covington) 
Holy Cross 

(Covington) 
Holy Family 

(Ashland) 
Holy Name 

(Henderson) 
Hopkinsville 
Horse Branch 
Hughes-Kirlc 

(Beechmont) 
Hustonville 
Inez 
Irvine 
Irvington 
Jackson 
Jenkins 
J. M. Atherton 

(Louisville) 
Junction City 
Kentucky Mil. Institute 

(Lyndon) 
Kentucky Sch. for Blind 

(Louisville) 
Kingdom Come 

(Linefork) 
Kirksey 
Knott County 

(Pippa Passes) 
Knox Central 

(Barbourville) 
Kyrock 

(Sweeden) 
Lacy 

(Hopkinsville) 
Lafayette 

(Lexington) 
Lancaster 
Leatherwood 

(Slemp) 
Lebanon 

Lebanon Junction 
Lee County 

(Beattyville) 
Leslie County 

(Hyden) 
Leitchfield 
Letcher 
Lewisburg 
Lewi sport 
Lexington Catholic 
Liberty 
Lincoln 

(Franklin) 
Lincoln 

(Middlesboro) 
Lincoln 

(Paducah) 
Lincoln Institute 

(Lincoln Ridge) 
Livermore 
Livingston 
Lloyd 

(Erlanger) 
London 



Lone Jack 

(Four Mile) 
Louisa 

Louisville Country Day 
Lowes 
Loyall 
Ludlow 
Lynn Camp 

(Corbin) 
Lynn Grove 
Lynnvale 

(White Mills) 
McCreary County 

(Whitley City) 
McDowell 
McKee 
McKell 

(South Shore) 
McKinney 
Mackville 
Madison Central 

(Richmond) 
Madison-Model 

(Richmond) 
Madisonville 
Magnolia 
Magoffin Baptist Inst. 

(Mountain Valley) 
Male 

(Louisville) 
Marrowbone 
Martin 
Mayfield 
May's Lick 
Maysville 
Maytown 

(Langley) 
Meade County 

(Brandenburg) 
Meade Memorial 

(Williamsport) 
Memorial 

(Hardyville) 
Memorial 

(Waynesburg) 
Menifee County 

(Frenchburg) 
Mercer 

(Harrodsburg) 
Metcalfe County 

(Edmonton) 
Middlesboro 
Middleburg 
Midway 

Millersburg Mill. Inst. 
Million 

(Earlington) 
Montgomery oCunty 

(Mt. Sterling) 
Monticello 
Morehead 
Morgan 
Morgan County 

(IWest Liberty) , 
Morganfield 
Mt. Sterling 
Mt. Vernon 
Mt. Washington 
Muhlenberg Central 

(Powderly) 
Mullins 

(Pikeville) 



Murray 

Nancy 

Napier 

(Hazard) 
Nebo 

New Concord 
Newport 

Newport Catholic 
Nicholas County 

(Carlisle) 
Nicholasville 
North Marshall 

(Calvert City) 
North Middletown 
Nortn Warren 

(Smiths Grove) 
Oil Springs 
Oldham County 

(LaGrange) 
Old Kentucky Home 

(BardstovsTi) 
Olive Hill 
Olmstead 
Oneida Institute 
Orangeburg 

(Maysville) 
Ormsby Village 

(Anchorage) 
Owen County 

(Owenton) 
Owensboro 
Owensboro Catholic 
Owingsville 
Owsley County 

(Booneville) 
Paducah Tilghman 
Paint Lick 
Paintsville 
Paris 
Park City 
Parksville 
Paul Laurence Dunbar 

(Lexington) 
Peaks Mill 

(Frankfort) 
Pembroke 
Perryville 
Phelps 
Pikeville 
Pine Knot 
Pineville 
Prichard 

(Grayson) 
Pleasant View 
Powell County 

(Stanton) 
Prestonsburg 
Providence 
Pulaski County 

(Somerset) 
Raceland 
Red Bird 

(Beverly) 
Reidland 

(Paducah) 
Richardsville 
Rineyville 
Riverview 

(Hickman) 
Rockhold 
Rosenwald 

(Harlan) 



Rosenwald 

(Lebanon) 
Rosenwald 

(Madisonville) 
Rosenwald Dunbar 

(Nicholasville) 
Russell 
Russe'l County 

(Russell Springs) 
Russellville 
Sacramento 
St. Aug-ustine 

(Lebanon) 
St. Benedict 

(Lebanon Junction) 
St. Camillus Acad. 

(Corbin) 
St. Catherine 

(New Haven) 
St. Charles 

(Lebanon) 
St. Francis 

(Loretto) 
St. Henry 

(Erlanger) 
St. John 

(Paducah) 
St. Joseph Prep. 

(Bardstown) 
St. Mary 

(Alexandria) 
St. Patrick's 

(Maysville) 
St. Thomas 

(Ft. Thomas) 
St. Vincent Acad. 
St. Xavier 

(Louisville) 
Salyersville 
Sandy Hook 
Scott County 

(Georgetown) 
Scottsville 
Sebree 
Sedalia 
Sharpsburg 
Shawnee 

(Louisville) 
Shelbyville 
Shepherdsville 
Shopville 
Silver Grove 
Simmons 

(Versailles) 
Simon Kenton 

(Independence) 
Simpsonville 
Sinking Fork 

(Hopkinsville) 
Slaughters 
Somerset 
Sonora 
South Christian 

(Herndon) 
Southern 

(Louisville) 
South Hopkins 

(Nortonville) 
South Marshall 

(Benton) 
South Portsmouth 
Springfield 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1957 



Page Seven 



Stanford 

Stearns 

Sturgis 

Sunfish 

Symsonia 

Taylorsville 

Temple Hill 

(Glasgow) 
Todd County 

(Elkton) 
Todd County Training 

(Elkton) 
Tollesboro 
Tompkinsville 
Trigg County 

(Cadiz) 
Ti'imble County 

(Bedford) 
Trinity 

(Louisville) 
Tyner 
University 

(Lexington) 
Utica 
Valley 

(Valley Station) 
Vanceburg-Lewis County 

(Vanceburg) 
Versailles 
Villa Madonna Acad. 

(Covingrton) 
Vine Grove 



Virgie 
Waddy 
Waggener 

(Louisville) 
Wallins 
Walton- Verona 

(Walton) 
Warfield 
Warren County 

(Bowling Green) 
Wayne County 

(Monticello) 
Western 

(Owensboro) 
Western 

(Paris) 
Western 

(Sinai) 
West Main Street 

(Lynch) 
Wheelwright 
Whitesburg 
Williamsburg 
Williamstown 
Wilmore 
Winchester 
Wingo 
Wolfe County 

(Campton) 
Woodbine 
Wurtland 



Tackling Can Be Safe 

Follow these safe, simple techniques when 
tackling : 

1. Keep your eyes open and on the target 
and seek a position. Remember most backs 
will avoid you, so position is important. 

2. Feet wide apart and body controlled 
with arms in gorilla-like style, (a) You are 
in a better position to fight off blockers. 

(b) This makes the ball carrier's shoulder 
fakes show, so his fakes will be of little use. 

(c) Trap him by position using side lines, 
team mates, or blocked out players. 

3. Get in close before you show, (a) Get in 
real close and then take one more step. Step 
through ball carrier, (b) You can never get 
in too close. 

4. Drop your shoulder at the carrier's 
waistline and drive into him. (a) Never dive 
toward ball carrier, keep your feet under you 
as long as you possibly can. (b) Avoid hitting 
too far from target. This eliminates falling 
to the knees on tackling and the possibility 
of getting the carrier's knees in your face 
or his cleats on your hands. 

5. On solid contact, lock your arms around 
him and lift the ball carrier off the ground, 
(a) Failure to lock arms comes from poor 
shoulder contact or from getting the head 
into the target instead of the shoulders. 



(b) Failure of a leg drive results in poor 
shoulder contact using a bent back and too 
low approach causing the head to be down 
and in an unsafe position. 

6. Aim the head with the shoulder, but let 
the head slip behind the carrier, (a) When 
good shoulder contact is made, the head will 
slip past ribs on the carrier without too much 
practice, (b) Carriers today in open field 
play like to cut back into the tacklers as this 
gives greater opportunities for the use of 
fakes and the use of leg drive to free them- 
selves, (c) You will notice from watching 
any good college or professional game that 
seldom does the tackier throw his head and 
body in front of the carriers. Grasp tight, 
drive the legs hard and put the opponents 
down. Frequently the tackier does not get in 
close enough for leg support, taking off too 
far back makes him an arm tackier and one 
easy to run past. 

— Coach Win Brockmeyer, Wisconsin. 



Football Safety Commandments 

1. Before contact or a fall, pull in your 
head. Hide it in your shoulders. Don't 
stick out your neck. Keep it short and 
straight. 

2. In tackling or being tackled, keep alert 
and in balance. Protect yourself — you're no 
good to the team in a plaster cast. 

3. In falling, a rigid arm can break a collar- 
bone. Roll or absorb shock by degrees. You'll 
be around longer. 

4. Horsing around on a slippery shower or 
dressing room floor is an open invitation to 
disaster. This means you! 

5. Anyone can get blistered feet in early 
practice. Only a square will fail to make im- 
mediate correction by way of band-aid or 
attention to the shoe. Not tomorrow- — but 
now! 

6. Sloppy-Joe shoe laces, chin strap or 
pad fastenings are marks of a small-time 
player. 

7. Failing to report a cut or bruise or 
sprain isn't a sign of toughness — it's just 
dumbness. 

8. In practice or during a game, being alert 
by keeping the mind on the business at hand 
is the best type of injury insurance. 

9. The wearing of tooth or face protector 
is good horse-sense. Intentionally grabbing 
or twisting that of an opponent is in the 
same class with pretending to be injured. 

10. Wearing cleated shoes on a concrete 
or brick surface is a sure way to reap a crop 
of scratches, cuts and tears. 

Who? Me? — National Federation. 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1957 



The Flying Dutchman 

Right now the Dutchman is packing for 
a sashay to Indianapohs to do the state-wide 
Basketball Clinic for the team of Commis- 
sioner L. V. Phillips and Assistant Commis- 
sioner Bob Hinshaw. Those Kentuckians who 
have never yet met this duo will find one 
equally as personable and effective as the 
pair we boast of in Kentucky. 

The main reason athletics have progressed 
so far nationally in high school circles is 
due to the fine administrative teams who 
head the various state programs. Charlie 
Forsythe, Commissioner of the Michigan 
Association, and his assistant, Dave Arnold, 
are two of the most impressive gentlemen 
The Dutchman has met in the field, while 
the team of Bridges and Porter, heading up 
the Tennessee organization, again represents 
the "cream of the crop." Each new contact 
we make with the heads of the high school 
athletic associations convinces us more that 
the country has the best men possible run- 
ning schoolboy athletics. 

The teamwork which exists between the 
state organizations is another beautiful 
thing to study. The neighborly feeling exist- 
ing between the states is evidenced when 
Indiana has a Kentuckian as its guest rules 
interpreter. The Dutchman feels that a 
great compliment was extended him when 
the Indiana High School Athletic Association 
provided him opportunities to meet Indiana's 
outstanding officials. Another treat is al- 
ways in store at the Indiana Clinic because 
Michigan's Charlie Forsythe and Dave Ar- 
nold are always present and that means a 
pleasant occasion for anybody. 

About the basketball clinics, so widely 
have they become acclaimed, that this year's 
junket over Kentucky will be covered in a 
Sunday Pictorial Magazine story written by 
Joe Creason, popular feature wi'iter for the 
Courier-Journal Magazine. Shots of clinic 
activities were taken in various sections of 
the Commonwealth. Our athletic fraternity 
should get a lot of pleasure from the recog- 
nition "Smoky Joe" Creason will give the 
sessions. 

Just bumped into Louis Litchfield at the 
Governor's Education Conference, and we 
talked over basketball officiating in Ken- 
tucky now as compared to the early '40's 
when Louis and the Dutchman officiated the 
state meet. Louis expressed the thought 
that officiating has progressed a long way. 
Countless other Kentuckians have expressed 



agreement with his thought. This is largely 
due to the training program initiated by the 
K.H.S.A.A. way back in the late '30's. It 
takes time to develop strong programs and 
years to work out the flaws. Presently, Ken- 
tucky schoolboy officials are getting excel- 
lent training through the sixteen regional 
schools being conducted by the regional direc- 
tors of the K.H.S.A.A. 

Another force lending itself to improved 
officiating is the increased number of of- 
ficials' associations coming into existence in 
the state annually. With all of these associa- 
tions cooperating, it is hard to estimate the 
amount of improvement which will result. 
Our personal experience in Indiana causes 
us to compliment highly Commissioner 
Phillips and Assistant Commissioner Hin- 
shaw on being out front with their well or- 
ganized officials' associations. The good will 
which exists in our sister state amongst the 
associations is good to see and must be at- 
tributed largely to the leadership at the top. 

All of us are interested in the promotion 
of wholesome sports throughout the entire 
year through the medium of sound recrea- 
tion programs as well as scholastic ones. So 
it is that the salute of the month goes to 
Bowling Green, Kentucky, which will initiate 
its year-round recreation program on Octo- 
ber 21. Another salute goes to Paul Walker, 
stellar schoolboy athlete under Coach Frank 
Camp when that gentleman was guiding the 
athletic destinies of Glasgow. 

Walker's advent to Bowling Green means 
a loss to Elizabethtown's program of recrea- 
tion where Paul turned in an outstanding 
job. At the present time, Elizabethtown is 
attempting to interest Bill Long, well known 
basketball official of the Falls Cities area 
and an outstanding recreation leader, in that 
position. By the time the Dutchman goes to 
press, it may be that another basketball of- 
ficial is heading up a recreation program. 

Officials make up a grand brotherhood. 
Nobody can measure the amount of good 
fellows like John "Beef" Showalter, of 
Georgetown, have done for football and 
basketball arbiters throughout the Common- 
wealth. This popular chap has not only been 
a great leader, but has been an outstanding 
example of the type of individual we like to 
have in athletic officiating circles. So many 
unselfish services have been contributed by 
"Beef", both in his service to the Board of 
Education of his area and to athletes and 
athletics everywhere, that he is recognized 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1957 



Page Nine 



this month as the winner of the Corn Cob 
Pipe of Honor for the month. 

As John Showalter looks at his Httle race 
horse with the cob pipe adorning its neck, 
he may well feel satisfaction for the grand 
contribution he has made to education and 
both schoolboy and college sports in Ken- 
tucky. They should have made more like this 
Georgetown Country Gentleman. This world 
could use lots of "Beefs" like "Beef". 

One more reminder about the reasons the 
Flying Dutchman column has for existence. 
The first, to await your recommendations of 
people who should receive the Corn Cob Pipe 
of Honor for unselfish service to others ; 
second, to await your recommendations of 
communities which should be cited with the 
Abou Ben Adhem Certificate for good neigh- 
borly practices in sports ; third, to await your 
recommendations of those youngsters who 
can qualify as Game Guys for overcoming 
physical handicaps to engage in sports; and, 
finally, to recognize these people with their 
deserved awards and thus encourage others 
to do likewise, continually elevating our ath- 
letic program to higher levels. 



Clinic For Cheerleaders 

The time is again drawing near for the 
annual Cheerleaders Clinic and Youth Day 
which will be held at the University of Ken- 
tucky. This event, which comes off on Satur- 
day, November 2, this year, is sponsored by 
the Kentucky State Y. M. C. A. All cheer- 
leaders, majorettes, sponsors, and other stu- 
dents from high schools over the state of 
Kentucky are invited to attend this clinic. 
The main over-all theme of the Cheerleaders 
Chnic is "Clean Sportsmanship," and its pur- 
pose is to recognize the value of the cheering 
section and the importance of the cheerlead- 
ers and majorettes both to the spectators 
and to the players on the field. 

The clinic this year will again hold ses- 
sions for the cheei'leaders and majorettes, 
and a special program for all other high 
school students who attend. The cheerlead- 
ers' session will be given special instructions 
for pre-game performances, and during this 
session all cheerleaders will give their high 
schools' favorite cheer. The majorettes' ses- 
sion will be given over to skills in baton 
twirling and special instruction for their part 
in pre-game performance. A fine program by 
the University, including athletic skill and 
achievement, will be provided for students 
other than cheerleaders and majorettes. 

All in all, the Cheerleaders Clinic is one 
of the high spots in the life of the high school 



student and every school is urged to send as 
many boys and girls as they possibly can. 
The afternoon game will be the Kentucky- 
Memphis State game. 

The clinic has grown in such proportions 
that the Kentucky State Y.M.C.A. has set 
up two other clinics. These clinics will be held 
at Western Kentucky State College, Bowling 
Green, and at Murray State Teachers Col- 
lege, Murray, both on November 16. 

EARLY SEASON FOOTBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 
time-out charged to A, B requests a time-out. 
RuHng: Request should not be granted. If 
health or safety factor is involved, the Ref- 
eree has authority to charge a subsequent 
time-out to himself. 

38. Play: 3rd on B's 5. A's legal pass is 
intercepted by Bl. Bl is in air over his 1 
yardline when he gets possession. Before he 
alights, he is tackled by A2 and is brought 
to the ground with ball in B's end zone. 

Ruling: In actual practice. Official will 
probably rule touchback. However, the only 
grounds on which he could do it would be 
that ball was in end zone before the tackle. 
If it is clear the ball is not in the end zone 
before the tackle, Official must decide when 
Bl obtained possesion. If he chooses to rule 
Bl was not in possession until he came to 
the ground and if the rule is followed liter- 
ally, A2 has committed a foul for tackling a 
player other than runner. If he rules Bl had 
possession before tackle and before ball was 
in the end zone, neither team has committed 
a foul and the ball should be awarded to Bl 
at the point of furthest advance while in the 
grasp of an opponent. This would be the 1 
yardline. 

39. Play : A forward pass comes down over 
B's 5. Bl intercepts while running toward 
his goal line. He gets ball in his hands on 5, 
comes to ground on his 1 and steps into his 
end zone before he can change direction. He 
is downed in end zone. 

Ruling: Safety. 

40. Play: Does B make a false start by 
stepping into the neutral zone and then 
stepping back before the snap? 

Ruling: No. B cannot false start. How- 
ever, in an unusual case, B could commit en- 
croachment by persisting in the action de- 
scribed in the above play, if there is intend- 
ed deception or the action of B is such that 
it throws A off balance. But because all A 
players are supposed to know when the snap 
is to be made and the players of B do not. 
Officials are generally liberal as to what con- 
stitutes legal action by B in this situation. 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1957 



Here and There 

MORE OR LESS PERSONAL: C, W. 
WHITTEN, who was the first full-time State 
High School Association Executive Officer, 
administrative officer of the National Feder- 
ation for many years and a pioneer in State 
Association and National Federation projects 
celebrated his 86th birthday on August 6th. 
He resides at 721 Kingston, St. Petersburg, 
Florida. He reports reasonably good health 
and continued interest in all Association and 
Federation activities. 

SALEN "DOC" HERKE, veteran member 
of the National Federation Football Commit- 
tee, passed away at Peoria, Illinois on July 
26 to join other illustrious members of the 
Great Team Above, including his good friends 
L. L. McLucas (Florida), Bill Fisher (Wash- 
ington) and Shorty Ray (Illinois) who died 
within the past year. Salen was coach and 
athletic director at Peoria Central High 
School and City Recreation Director for so 
many years that he had become an institu- 
tion in the community. The boys whose lives 
he has influenced have become prominent 
in every field of activity. The listing of all 
of them would involve repeating a goodly 
portion of "Who's Who". The citizens of 
Peoria have inaugurated a memorial scholar- 
ship fund in his honor, the fund to be ad- 
ministered by Peoria Central High School 
authorities. 

MILTON RAYMER, Executive Secretary 
of the American Junior Bowling Congress 
and participant in many of the National Fed- 
eration programs, has been honored by being 
presented with the Fourth Annual Service 
Award. He was chosen for the honor by a 
ballot of the Bowling Writers' Association. 
Those active in State High School Athletic 
administration join in offering congratula- 
tions for having received this honor and for 
having rendered a fine service to the High 
School athletic program through proper ad- 
ministration of the controls which have made 
bowling a respected part of the school pro- 
gram in places where the school has chosen 
to work with local organizations which have 
facilities for sponsoring this sport. 

JOHN SEXTON, Principal of Northeast 
High School in St. Petersburg and President 
of the Florida Principal's Association, has 
been nominated to represent his section on 
the Executive Committee of the National 
Association of Secondary-School Principals. 
John has been active in the school athletic 
program and was especially helpful in the 



making of the motion picture "Football-by- 
the-Code." 

THE ALLIANCE between the National 
Federation and the National Junior College 
Athletic Association is proving to be a popu- 
lar movement. There are many overlapping 
interests. In many cases, the Junior College 
and the High School in a given community 
are under the same administrative body. The 
same, or adjoining athletic fields and plants 
are used. In practically all cases the same ath- 
letic officials work games for both. During 
the current season, the playing rules and all 
related interpretations and instructive ma- 
terial will be the same for both groups. For 
football, the jointly produced Federation- 
Junior College code has been adopted as of- 
ficial and these rules will be used in any 
games sponsored by the Junior College As- 
sociation, including the Junior College na- 
tional championship game. 

MINNESOTA will, beginning with the 
school year 1958-59, limit the number of in- 
terscholastic basketball games to 16, ex- 
clusive of the league-sponsored tournament 
series. A player is limited to five quarters 
of basketball participation in one day and no 
more than four quarters may be consecutive. 
A uniform date for initial practices in win- 
ter sports, the second Monday in November, 
has been established. 

BRUCE DRAKE, a past chairman of the 
National Basketball Committee and member 
of the advisory staff for the motion picture 
"King Basketball" is now coach of the fa- 
mous "Wichita Vickers" in the National 
Industrial League. 

BRICE DURBIN (Kansas Aissistant Sec- 
retary) authored an article, "All- American 
Basketball Practices", which has had a wide 
circulation. The article encourages emphasis 
on developing a "desire to win and a good 
team spirit." He contends that lack of de- 
sire often can be laid to an athlete's not know- 
ing where he is going. 

THE SYMPATHY of the entire Federation 
family is extended to Reed K. Swenson, 
President of the National Junior College 
Athletic Association. Mrs. Swenson died in 
an automobile collision during Labor Day 
weekend. 

HOMER THOMPSON (Georgia) popular 
figure at Federation meetings where he 
represents his company in complimenting the 
group with Coca-(]ola passed away on Sep- 
tember 11, 1957. An expression of sympathy 
has been sent to his family on behalf of the 
Federation. 

W. W. RUSSELL (California) has com- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1957 



Page Eleven 



pleted the list of outstanding performers in 
track and field. This will constitute the honor 
roll to be published in the 1958 edition of the 
Track and Field Rules Book. Bill is not to 
blame for inclusion of so many California 
boys. The 1957 crop of performers in that 
area just had "it." 

SECRETARY J. C. HARPER (Alabama) 
authored an article "Good Students Make 
Good Athletes" which has had wide circula- 
tion by way of the Southern Coach and Ath- 
lete. It ends with the line "Good students 
make good athletes. Good athletes make fine 
citizens." 

PRE-SEASON FOOTBALL PRACTICE 
REGULATIONS create problems which in- 
clude overemphasis ; taking boys from sum- 
mer jobs; extra compensation for coaches; 
taking coaches away from summer positions ; 
and additional cost for lights, care of equip- 
ment and the early opening of the school 
building. 

According to good authority, pre-season 
practice can be overdone. Two practices a 
day, morning and afternoon, will not con- 
dition players. After the third day, vitality 
is reduced, mental alertness is lost and the 
injury rate is markedly increased. The two- 
a-day practice schedule does not permit suf- 
ficient time for recovery from injury. The 
practice was started to attempt to crowd into 
two weeks' time four or five weeks of prep- 
aration. 

The RAWLINGS SPORTING GOODS 
COMPANY, now part of the A. G. Spalding 
organization, has expanded by building a 
Willow Springs division of their factory. 
The new facilities were made necessary by 
the expanding demand for athletic equip- 
ment. More leisure time and more participa- 
tion in sports point to an expanding market 
for athletic equipment and sporting goods. 
The new division contains more manufactur- 
ing facilities than that of the entire plant 
prior to World War II. 

BASKETBALL BACKBOARDS: Growing 
use of the transparent backboard makes the 
following questions and answers timely. 
Question — Is a glass backboard legal if it 
has a metal binding which projects slightly 
above the glass surface? Answer — The rules 
do not prohibit this. The edges of non-break- 
able glass are vulnerable. A blow to an un- 
protected edge may cause the entire board to 
disintegrate. While it is possible to fabricate 
a board such that the metal binding is flush 
with the surface, it is expensive and less 
safe than one in which the entire edge is 
covered with aluminum or other metal. The 



standards approved by the Basketball Equip- 
ment Committee allow a binding to be not 
more than 3/16 inch above the surface. Pos- 
sible interference with the ball is more imag- 
ined than real. Question — Is it legal to have 
the target behind the basket and the borders 
etched in the glass? Answer — Yes. Such 
marking may appear gray instead of pure 
white from certain angles. Most groups do 
not find this objectionable. If more pro- 
nounced white is desired, white paint over 
or behind the etchinor may be used. 



News About Swimming 

Mr. Charles McCaffree, Swimming Coach 
at Michigan State University, and Secretary 
of the N.C.A.A. Swimming Rules Commit- 
tee, has prenared brief statements on e^ch of 
the three major chano'es that affect inter- 
scholastic swimming. They are as follows: 

1. The 100 Yard Butterfly event becomes a 
surface stroke. One arm pull and one leg 
kick are allowed at the start and on each 
turn. The stroke must be performed on the 
surface at all other times. 

2. The 100 Yard Breaststroke event has 
been added to the interscholastic program 
and becomes a surface stroke. One arm pull 
and one leg kick are allowed at the start and 
on the turns. The breaststroke must be 
performed on the surface. 

3. The 400 Yard Freestvle has been added 
to interscholastic championshio competition 
as event No. 1 (This will apply to Class A 
State Swimming Meet only). 

Several excellent films on swimmine are 
available in the Department of Audio- Visual 
Services, College of Adult and Extension 
Education, Universitv of Kentucky, Lexing- 
ton. E. W. Craik, State Swimming Commit- 
tee member, writes that he considers three 
of the best films on swimming ever produced 
to be American Red Cross films entitled 
Learning to Swim, Fundamentals of Swim- 
ming, and Skilled Swimming. Mr. Craik 
states that these films are available at many 
Red Cross chapters, and that thev are avail- 
able on a loan basis from Red Cross area 
headquarters. 615 North St. Asaph Street, 
Alexandria, Virginia. 



Corrections 

FOOTBALL : 

No significant errors have been discovered 
in the rules or case book. In the new edition 
of the Football Plaver Handbook, the fifth 
answer under Part IV on page 52 should be 
"Safety" instead of "Touchback". 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR OCTOBER, 1957 



6-MAN FOOTBALL: 

Delete the expression "or a place-kick from 
kick-off after safety" in item d of rule 4-2-2 
and "or safety" in the third sentence of the 
second paragraph of rule 5-3-2. In 6-Man, a 
kick-off after safety is from the 30 yardline 
and a field eroal cannot be scored on such kick. 

BASKETBALL: 

Basketball Rules: In tenth line of third 
paragraph of 5-7, omit "from a false double 
foul." Statement is correctly apnlied to a 
false double foul but needs revision to cover 
case where A scores field goal and then com- 
mits a foul before ball becomes dead and the 
free throw matches the 2 points scored by 
the field goal. 

Basketball Case: On page 4, comment un- 
der 4-7 (a) should refer to "while ball is in 
flight" instead of to "during continuing mo- 
tion." On page 13, answer 4 at top of page 
should be deleted since double fouls do not 
result in free throws. 

Basketball Meeting Folder: On page 5, 
the second question might cause argument as 
to how there could be a violation while ball is 
in flisht during try for field goal. Goal tend- 
ing or basket interference are such violations. 
On page 3 in the key to questions, the last 
two answers (2 and 0) of question 4 in the 
first line should be I'eversed (to be 0' and 2). 
On page 9, in the last sentence of Play 13, 
(a) should be changed to (b). 

Asian Influenza 

School groups, because of close daily as- 
sociation such as in locker rooms, gymnas- 
iums and playing fields, are vulnerable to 
rapid transmission of a contagious disorder 
such as influenza. 

Asian Influenza has effected about 22 to 
25% of the population in areas where it has 
struck although this percentage might be 
higher in a school group. An estimate of the 
degree of seriousness would be conjecture. 
It is possible that later waves of infection 
miffht be increasingly more severe. 

The present tyne of "flu" is not deadily 
but the complications may be serious. Typic- 
ally, it develops like a severe cold, running its 
acute course in four or five days. The disease 
causes high fever, headache, severe sore 
throat, general weakness and muscular aches. 
In most patients, a weakened condition con- 
tinues for a week or two. An athlete who has 
contracted the "flu" should not enter strenu- 
ous competition until certified as fit by a 
physician. 

Health precautions should follow patterns 
as outlined by local health departments. A 



vaccine against the Asian type influenza is 
rationed at the state level on a population 
basis. Local medical and health authorities 
have been requested to cooperate in provid- 
ing immunization, with priority being given 
to: (1) Those necessary to maintenance of 
community health or other basic community 
services; or (2) tuberculosis patients and 
others, who in the opinion of a physician, 
constitute a special medical risk. 

Advance planning with local physicians 
and community health authorities before a 
threatened epidemic strikes is good practice. 

NOT TOMORROW— BUT NOW. 

— National Federation in Cooperation with 
the A. M. A. 



Sauce For The Gander 

Dear Coach Musselman : 

Remembering our discussions of your foot- 
ball men who were having troubles in Eng- 
lish, I have decided to ask you, in turn, for 
help. 

We feel that Paul Spindles, one of our most 
promising scholars, has a chance for a 
Rhodes Scholarship, which would be a great 
thing for him and for our college. Paul has 
the academic record for this award, but we 
find that the aspirant is also required to 
have other excellences, and ideally should 
have a good record in athletics. Paul is weak. 
He tries hard, but he has troubles in ath- 
letics. But he does try hard. 

We propose that you give some special con- 
sideration to Paul as a varsity player, put- 
ting him if possible in the backfield of the 
football team. In this way, we can show a 
better college record to the committee decid- 
ing on the Rhodes Scholarships. We realize 
that Paul will be a problem on the field, 
but — as you have often said — cooperation be- 
tween our department and yours is highly 
desirable, and we do expect Paul to try hard, 
of course. During intervals of study we shall 
coach him as much as we can. His work in 
English Club and on the debate team will 
force him to miss many practices, but we in- 
tend to see that he cari'ies an old football 
around to bounce (or whatever one does with 
a football) during intervals in his work. We 
expect Paul to show entire good will in his 
work for you, and though he will not be able 
to begin football practice till late in the sea- 
son, he will finish the season with good at- 
tendance. 

Sincerely yours, 
Benjamin Plotinus, Chairman 
English Department. 
— Wm. Stafford in College English 



I 



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INCORPORATEO 

103 PHONE 104 
MAY FIELD, KENTUCKY 



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by HAND KNIT, STADIUM and, of course O'SHEA. 

We have jackets made for us especially 'by BUTWIN and POWERS ; also 
made to our special order, reversible, all styles and fabrics. 

We know of no better values anywhere. 

We can furnish you with athletic award leters in chenille to your order 
of the very highest quality and at reasonable prices. 

Remember that each and every order for any type of merchandise, 
whether special-made or out of stock, gets the personal attention of every 
person in our store. 

If you would like to see our salesman for either football or basketball 
supplies, call us at 103 or 104 Mayfield. 

ROY BOYD, HERBIE HUNT, JIM MITCHELL, BILL HUNT or C. A. 
BYRN, JR. are always in our store, ready to assist you in every way 
possible. 

If you want the BEST QUALITY and the BEST SERVICE, contact 
HUNT'S. 



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No. SSV-W — This Sand sweater is in solid white! The 
choice of Cheerleaders, Bands, and very popular as an 
Athletic Award. White only. Each $9.15 

58V-6V— Popular Award or Cheerleader sweater, 100% 
Wool. Stock colors: Black, Old Gold, Royal, Scarlet, 
Purple, Maroon, Kelly, Light Gold, Burnt Orange. 
Each -..$9.75 

Reversible Honor Jackets 

Butwin Jackets ^"^^ "* ^°'' °"' catalog with 

Special School Prices 

LETTERING: 6" Chenille Letters 
40c each; Chenille Chevrons, 45c; 
Service Stripes in sleeves costs 35c 
for delivery. 



No. 1020— A Sand product .... Heavy Baby Shaker 
Weave . . . 100% Pure Wool Yarn . . . Choice of 
Schools who want the best .... Stock Colors: White, 
Kelly, Black, Royal, Scarlet, Purple, Cardinal, Old Gold. 
Each ..$13.65 

No. 58 J — An Imperial product . . . favored by many 
schools. Coat style with 2 pockets .... 100% Wool 
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High School Athfefe 

New Lexington Catholic School Plant 



t^^ fe4kA»«Afe«»j(fefiJ» 





The Lexington Catholic High School was completed in May, 1957. The cost of the building 
was approximately $720,000. It will accommodate 425 students. There are 2200 permanent 
seats in the gymnasium. 



Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 
NOVEMBER - 1957 



The 
COACH 



He never ranted and raved 

When we fumbled the ball or lost a race; 
Jest took it kinda quiet like. 

Always looked the same — kind of a poker face. 
He wasn't so old I guess, 

But wise; always seemed to have a plan 
To get us kids out of a slump,- — • 

Guess that's why we called him "Th' 01' Man." 



Never talked much or bragged. 

Came out to practice in old baggy clothes. 
He'd jest stand around an' say 

"Chuck, stretch out, — run more on your toes", 
Or, "Bob, play nearer the end." 

Kinda different. At first we'd just go ahead 
Like we were ; but before long 

We were doin' like Th' 01' Man said. 



He felt more inside than showed, 

Had lines on his face, and hair gettin' gray, 
Like he worried about us. 

But you'd never know from anything he'd say. 
Voice kinda gruff when we'd win 

An' his f ace'd get all red under th' tan ; 
"Not bad", he'd say, an' we knew 

That was high praise from Th' 01' Man. 



An then sometimes we'd lose 

But he didn't bawl us out or tear his hair; 
Jest tightened his jaw a bit, — 

Even joked a Httle, so we'd think he didn't care; 
But all next week we remembered 

An' were out there when each practice began 
Ready to lose a right leg 

Or bust a heart to win for Th' 01' Man. 



Didn't think much about it then 

But after years of turmoil, bluster and noise 
There was a class reunion 

And thoughts were traded 'mong the boys. 
We've widely divergent paths 

But we started with a common unspoken plan; 
Each resolved, in the game of life, 

To make good,— for Th' 01' Man. 

— H. V.'s Athletic Anthology 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



Vol. XX— No. 4 



NOVEMBER, 1957 



$1.00 Per Year 



Editor's Note: 
rule. They ari 
situations whi< 



Early Season Basketball Questions — Installment 1 

no corresponding change was made in 9-3. 
Since 9-3 is merely a reminder of the provis- 
ions in 7-6, the omission is not significant. 

4. Play: During second extra period in a 
game in which the sudden end method is be- 
ing used, the score is A-50 and B-50. Al 
scores a field goal. While the try is in flight, 
he illegally charges into Bl. Bl scores on 
both the first free throw and the bonus free 
throw. 

Ruling : The scoring of one additional point 
may end the game. 

5. Play: In second extra period, each team 
scores one point on free throws, to make a 
tie score A-51 and B-51. Al then scores a 
field goal but commits a foul while the try 
is in flight. If Bl scores on the first free 
throw and also on the bonus free throw, 
have they won the game? 

Ruling: No. It is a tie score and one ad- 
ditional point may end the game. If the third 
sentence of third paragraph of Rule 5-7 were 
taken literally, B might claim to be the win- 
ner when they score their second noint on a 
free throw. The phrase "from a false double 
foul" is a holdover from pervious editions 
and should be deleted. 

6. Play: What is the relationship between 
the 15-foot non-scoring belt and the action- 
less contest rule? 

Ruling: The onlv relationship is that Of- 
ficial will hesitate to stop the r-ame and warn 
teams if the offense, while behind in the 
score, advances ball beyond the 15-foot non- 
scoring belt. If, in this advance area, there is 
passing or dribblino:, the Official will regard 
it as adequate action even if the defense 
holds in a deep zone. Under these circum- 
stances, the defense should be willing to 
move within guarding distance even if they 
are ahead in the score. If, because of failure 
to advance into scoring area. Referee finds 
it necessary to warn the teams, he will then 
pay no attention to the 15-foot belt unless 
the 5-seconds held ball rule is being applied. 

7. Play: During jump ball, jumper Al 



1. Play: Should penalty for use of a digit 
larger than 5 always be imposed and what 
are the numbers which are permissible? 

Ruling: According to rule, one free throw 
should be awarded to the opponent if any 
player or players appear on the court wear- 
ing a digit larger than 5. At least four states 
(California, Illinois, Missouri and Nebraska) 
have applied for and been granted permis- 
sion to delay enforcement of penalty for this 
act until the season of 1958-59. In Illinois, the 
delay in enforcement applies only to games 
other than varsity games. The purpose is to 
permit a school to continue to use jerseys 
with higher numbers in second team or class 
team games. Numbers which comply with 
the rules are: Even— 0, 4, 10, 12, 14, 20, 22, 
24, 30, 32, 34, 40, 42, 44, 50, 52 and 54 ; Odd 
—3, 5, 11, 13, 15, 21. 23, 25, 31. 33, 35, 
41, 43, 45, 51, 53 and 55. It is not illegal to 
use double zero or three digit numbers but 
they are not recommended. 

2. Play: What is the reason for differen- 
tiating between basket interference (items a 
and b of Rule 9-10) and goal tending (item 
c of Rule 9-10) ? 

Ruling: The important difference is that 
the goal tending infraction cannot occur dur- 
ing a free throw. If an attempt were made to 
apply it to a free throw, there would be com- 
plications because it would be possible to 
have one free throw violation followed by 
another, i.e., a player mierht have a foot over 
the lane too soon nnd this could be followed 
by the violation with a different penalty. At- 
tempts to cover such situations would prob- 
ably lead to more complications than separ- 
ating the two acts as outlined in 9-10. 

3. Play : Rule 7-6 about the throw-in states 
that he shall pass ball directlv into the court. 
Rule 9-3 does not include the word "directly." 
Is there a reason for the difference ? 

Ruling: The omission of "directly" in 9-3 is 
inadvertent. When the change of several 
years ago was made in the wording of 7-6, 



(Continued on Page Eleven) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1957 



NOVEMBER, 1957 



VOL XX— NO. 4 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky, 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIEU) 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1956-60), Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1957-61), Marion 

Directors — W. B. .Tones (1957-61) Somerset: W. H. Crowdus 
(1954-58), Franklin; Jack Dawson (1954-58), Louisville; 
Robert P. For^ythe (1965-59), Greenville; K. G. Gillaspie 
(1965-69), Georgetown; Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



Jrom the Commlsslonei s (Jffi 



ice 



REPORTS NOW DUE 

1. 1957 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report of Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



State Tournament Reservations 

The 19,58 State HiQ:h School Basketball 
Tournament will be heM in Lexington on 
March 19-22. On October 21 each principal of 
a K.H.S.A.A. member school and all city and 
county suDerintendents v^^ere mailed an- 
nouncements concerning reservations for 
lodging during tournament time. In this an- 
nouncement it was stated that the period of 
November 1-15 has been designated as the 
First Priority Period in the matter of making 
reservations for rooms. 

A Housinsr Committee, set up by the Lex- 
ington Chamber of Commerce, will assist 
with lodging reservations, giving first con- 
sideration to school renresentatives who live 
in distant parts of the state and to those 
whose reservations begin on Wednesday 
night, March 19. Requests for lodging reser- 
vations should be addressed to: Lexington 
Chamber of Commerce, Tournament Reser- 
vations, 239 North Broadway, Lexington, 
Kentucky. 

The Second Priority Period will be from 
November 15 to December 1. and will apply 
to others who nlan to attend the tournament. 
School officials should advise their patrons 
concerninor this period through articles in 
their local or county newspapers. 

National Federation Basketball Test 

Part 11 of the National Federation basket- 
ball examination will be given all over Ken- 
tucky on Monday, December 2, to officials 
who wish to work for the "approved" and 



"certified" ratings. Officials registered with 
the K.H.S.A.A. for the first time this year, 
and who have not been registered previously 
in any other state associations, are not elig- 
ible to take the test. Those interested should 
advise the State Office immediately in order 
that necessary arrangements can be made 
with the school administrators who will sup- 
ervise the taking of the exam. Officials living 
in Kentucky need not suggest the name of 
an examiner, since it is probable that one 
examiner for each county will be named. The 
"approved" rating does not carry forward 
from year to year, but must be earned each 
year. After an official has received the 
"certified" rating, he keeps this rating by 
attending clinics without having to continue 
to take the exam each year. 

Approved and Certified Officials 

Twenty-one football officials have quali- 
fied for the "certified" rating this fall, and 
one for the "approved" rating. These officials 
are: 

Certified Officials — Jim Barlow, Thomas 
P. Bell, Howard Bennett, Richard Betz, 
George W. Brown, Travis Combs, John S. 
Crosthwaite, Jr., Jack H. Durkin, W. H. 
Gammon, Gene Harris, Fletcher Holeman, 
Bernard Johnson, Raymond Kraesig, Carl 
Lawson, Bob McCollum, Bill Nau, Doug 
Noland. K. F. Schmitt, Joseph R. Schumann, 
John H. Shaw, Clifton Stone. 

Approved Official — Robert H. Florence. 



Protection Fund News 

Two hundred eighteen member schools of 
the K.H.S.A.A. had insured their athletes 
with the Protection Fund at the time this 
issue of the magazine went to press. One 
hundred thirty-six claims, totaling $3,197.58 
have been paid since July 1. 



Employment Bureaus 

Sixteen employment bureaus for officials, 
one in each basketball region, have been es- 
tablished. Each registered official should 
file at once with his bureau head and 'or the 
nearest bureau head his schedule of games 
and a list of dates on which the official will 
be available to call games. The names of the 
bureau heads, with their business and resi- 
dence phone numbers, are as follows: 

Region 1. Rex Alexander, Murray State 
College, Murray; Business No. 740, Ext. 15; 
Res. No. 1292W. 

Region 2. Amos Teague, Chickasaw Dr., 
Madisonville ; Res. No. Ta 1-4639. 

Region 3. Roy Settle, 1413 St. Mary's Ave., 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1957 



Page Three 



Owensboro; Business No. MU 3-3575; Res. 
No. MU 3-2136. 

Region 4. Bob Forsythe, 113 Chestnut, 
Greenville; Business No. 474; Res. No. 949. 

Region 5. James Jenkins, Route 1, Bowl- 
ing Green ; Res. No. 2-5954. 

Region 6. Howard Gardner, 307 Poplar Dr., 
Elizabethtown ; Business No. Fort Knox 
4654; Res. No. 4451. 

Region 7. Dave Longenecker, 3910 Olympic, 
Louisville; Business No. TW 5-3401, Ext. 
301-2 ; Res. No. TW 6-9071. 

C. 0. Ricketts, 10217 Starlight Way, Val- 
ley Station; Business No. ME 4-1551, Ext. 
220; Res. No. WA 1-9583. 

Region 8. Elmo Head, Shelbyville; Busi- 
ness No. 142 ; Res. No. 1273W. 

Region 9. John Schaar, Bellevue; Business 
No. Co. 1-2980; Res. No. Co. 1-5069. 

Region 10. Bennie Bridges, North Middle- 
town ; Res. No. 4392. 

Region 11. Harry Stephenson, 2210 Circle 
Dr., Lexington; Business No. 4-2431; Res. 
No. 4-9620. 

Region 12. Bob McLeod, Somerset; Busi- 
ness No. 545; Res. No. 571. 

Region 13. John S. Crosthwaite, Harlan ; 
Business No. 57; Res. No. 2075. 

Region 14. Arnett Strong, 425 Cedar, 
Hazard; Business No. 3300; Res. No. North 
389. 

Region 15. Dick Looney, Pikeville; Res. 
No. 813. 

Region 16. Ernie Chattin, 2147 Central, 
Ashland; Business No. East 4-6191; Res. No. 

1088. 

SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
MEMBER SCHOOLS OF THE K.H.S.A.A. 



Alvaton 
Buffalo 
Booker T. Washington 

(Ashland) 
Campbellsburg 
Carter 
Charleston 

(Dawson Springs) 
Clarkson 
Douglass 

(Henderson) 
Dunbar 

(Morganfield) 
Fail-view 

(Ashland) 
Feds Creek 
Foundation School 

(Berea) 
Hawesville 
John's Creek 
Lily 
Livingston County 

(Smithland) 
Lyon County 

(Kuttawa) 



Mason 

(Lancaster) 
Minerva 
Munfordville 
Pleasureville 
Poplar Creek 

(Carpenter) 
Rosenwald 

(Providence) 
Salem 
St. Agatha Academy 

(Winchester) 
St. Agnes 

(Uniontown) 
Stinnett Settlement 

(Hoskinston) 
Taylor County 

(Campbellsville) 
Uniontown 
Van Lear 
Wayland 
William Grant 

(Covington) 
Willisburg 



Minutes of Board Meeting 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association met at the K.H.S.A.A. 
Building, Lexington, on Saturday morning, October 
5, 1957. The meeting was called to order by Presi- 
dent Russell Williamson at 9:30, with all Board 
members, Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford, and 
Assistant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield present. 

Louis Litchfield moved, seconded by W. H. 
Crowdus, that the reading of the minutes of the 
July 27th meeting be waived, since the members of 
the Board had received copies of these minutes. 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

W. B. Jones, Chairman of the Retirement Com- 
mittee, discussed at length the terms of retirement 
contracts for Commissioner Sanford and Assistant 
Commissioner Mansfield which he and the members 
of his committee had prepared. Messrs. Sanford and 
Mansfield stated that the terms of the contracts as 
drawn were satisfactory to them. W. B. Jones moved, 
seconded by K. G. Gillaspie, that President William- 
son and Vice-President Litchfield be authorized to 
sign for the Board as party of the first part the 
contracts which the Retirement Committee had 
prepared for the Commissioner and Assistant Com- 
missioner. The motion was carried unanimously. 

Jack Dawson moved, seconded by K. G. Gillaspie, 
that Commissioner Sanford and Assistant Commis- 
sioner Mansfield be refunded the money which they 
had contributed to the K.H.S.A.A. Annuity Trust 
Fund plus 2-3/4</(> interest compounded annually, 
that the treasurer be authorized to sell the necessary 
amount of securities to pay this amount, and that 
the remainder of the account be transferred to the 
K.H.S.A.A. The motion was carried unanimously. 

Chairman W. H. Crowdus of the Football Champ- 
ionship Committee repoi-ted that eleven question- 
naires had been returned from states which spon- 
sored championships. He recommended that his com- 
mittee have a meeting prior to the next Board of 
Control meeting for the purpose of preparing a 
questionnaire concerning a possible K.H.S.A.A. foot- 
ball championship, to be sent to Kentucky schools 
now sponsoring football. 

The Commissioner read letters which he had 
received from Prin. William C. Summers of the 
Bate High School and Supt. John E. Robinson of the 
Danville City Schools, concerning- the eligibility of 
Roscoe Tucker, Donald Davis, and Michael Smith. 
He recommended that the eligibility of Roscoe Tuck- 
er at the Bate High School be restored immediately, 
and that the eligibility of Donald Davis and Michael 
Smith be restored as of the opening date of the 
second semester of the 1957-58 school year. W. B. 
Jones moved, seconded by Jack Dawson, that the 
recommendation of the Commissioner be accepted, 
and that the eligibility of the players mentioned be 
restored. The motion was carried unanimously. 

All members of the Board concurred with a de- 
cision of the Commissioner relative to the eligibility 
of Alan Gi-aham. now enrolled in the Old Kentucky 
Home School. 

The Commissioner stated that he had been asked 
previously by members of the Board of Control to 
get estimates on completing the two unfinished 
basement rooms in the K.H.S.A.A. Building. He 
stated that the R. T. Jordan firm of Lexington had 
given an estimate of $1286.00 for finishing the two 
rooms involved; and that Meriwether & Marye, the 
building architects, had advised that the bid was a 
reasonable one and should possibly be accepted, since 
it would hold for only a short period of time. The 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1957 



Commissioner stated further that he had gotten in 
touch with President iWillii-mson and Vice-President 
Litchfield, and that the three, acting as an execu- 
tive committee, had authorized R. T. Jordan to 
complete the work mentioned. Cecil A. Thornton 
moved, seconded by Robert P. Forsythe, that the 
action taken by the executive committee be sustained 
and approved. The motion was carried unanimously. 

The date of the next meeting of the Board was set 
for January 5, 1968, immediately prior to the open- 
ing of the National Federation Football Committee 
meeting, scheduled to be held in Lexington. 

Louis Litchfield moved, seconded by K. G. Gil- 
laspie, that Tommy Bell and Edgar McNabb be 
namea respectively delegate and alternate to the 
forthcoming- meeting of the National Fedei'ation 
Football Committee. The motion was carried un- 
animously. 

Cecil A. Thornton moved, seconded by W. H. 
Crowdus, that all bills of the Association, begin- 
ning July 27, 1957, and ending October 4, 1957, be 
allowed. The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Board was then called to order in its capa- 
city as Board of Directors of the K.H.S.A.A. Pro- 
tection Fund. 

Secretary-Treasurer Sanford presented a list of 
claims which had been paid by the Protection Fund 
since July 27, 1957, the total amount of these claims 
being $1,969.96. Jack Dawson moved, seconded by 
W. B. Jones, that the claims as presented by the 
Secretary-Treasurer of the Protection Fund be al- 
lowed. The motion was carried unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meeting 

adjourned. 

SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 

REGISTERED FOOTBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled November 1, 1957) 

If une telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise desginated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Chattin, Ernie P., 2147 Central, Ashland, 108S, East 4-6191 

Gorea, Frank, Box 452, Williamson, W. Va. 

Coudret, Raymond Joe, 843 E. Gum, Evansville. Ind.. Ha 2-1462 

Creekmore, Lester, 313 Center, Bellevue, Ju 1-2624 

Denton, Charles M., 1427 Clay, Henderson, Va 6-4020, Va 6-3195 

Fraley, Bill, 1604 Lee Dr., Henderson, Va 7-9410 

Cast, Robert W., 2038 Goldsmith Ln., Louisville, 01 4-7220, 

Mel 4-S301 
Grace, Hickory E., Middlesboro, 413 J 

Gross, F. E., 107 Lapsley Place, Knoxville, Tenn., 20874, 26012 
Hale, Don C, Berea 

Harris, Russell, 368 Boiling Springs Dr., Lexington, 4-6626 
Hofstetter, Carl, Rt. 1, Box 6, Williamson, W. Va., 814 
Kerr, Kenneth, 810 Brookline, Louisville, Em 8-0813, Ju 5-4000 
Lee, Charles J., Simmons High School, Versailles, Lexington, 

2-3003, Versailles 248 
Peeno, Harry R., 422 Oak St., Ludlow, Ju 1-7335 
Ratterman, Bernard W., Jr., 610 Dale Ave., Louisville 

Em 6-6909, Ju 7-1241, Ext. 6274 
Riggins, Jason, li/o W. 6th Ave., Williamson, W. Va. 
Scott, Luther, 211 Spruce St.. Murray, 1666 
Skinner, Earnest, 206 Pine St., Murray 
Swope, William, 406 Breckinridge, Lexington, 6-3698 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled November 1, 1957) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Abell, James Alvie, Burna, 3440 

Allen, Lowry R., 2800 Frederica, Owensboro, Mu 3-6761 
Allen, Stanley M., Hawesville, 3401 
Austin, W. G., 1928 Cherry. Paducah, 3-7071 
Baird. Bill. First St.. Box 493, Harlan. 632, 632 
Baker, Earl C, Jr., Crab Orchard, 3292 
Baker, Morris D.. Delmer 
Barker, Donald, Bates, Harrodsburg 4160 
Barnett, J. W., 201 College St., Somerset, 741 R, 907 
Bartley, Robert E., Hellier 

Baskin, Sylvester, 214 West, P. O. Box 1066, Lynch, Vi 8-5637 
Beard, Monie, 617 Hampton Rd., Bowling Green, Victor 3-8848, 
Victor 3-6036 



Beard, Ralph M., 211 Tyne Rd., Louisville, Tw 37722, Tw 37722 

Begiey, James P., Tlltord, 1841 (Bus. No.) 

Belcner, tlsier. Pine Ave., Elkhorn City, 2601 

BlacKDurn, Clyde W., London, 620 X, 675 

BlanKensnip, Z,eb, Kt. 3, Kicnmond, 2229 M, 66 

Biumer, Snerry, Jr., 376 Park Ave., Lexinton, 3-0312 

Braughler, David L., Brooksville, 5-4721, Cincinnati PI 18550 

iirexei; Randell L., Route 4, London, 94 J., 722 

Bridges, Bennie h,., Nortn Middletown, 4392 

iiriscoe, Hubert, Shelbyville, 1484, 263 

Brown, Charles L. Jr., E. K. S. C, Richmond 

Brown, C. R., 1241/. Second St., Sliver Grove, Hi 1-5271 

Brummett, Joseph W., 519 O'Hara Dr., Danville, 2921, 1900 

Ext. 26 
Bruner, Jack C, P. O. Box 85, Lrfjndon, 360 L, 51 
Burkhart, Jimmy P. O. Box 133, Wallins, Mo. 4-3597 
Buzzerio, Larry, 133 N. 14th St., Murray, 1754 
Calhoun, ioster, Hindman, 1602 2410 
Capps, Jerry, Calvert City, Ex 54027 
Carroll, Joe E., Falcon 
Carson, Louis N., 6301 Harding, Portsmouth, Ohio, Scioto 

221-Y, Elmwood 34560 
Carter, Buddy, 314 High St., Vine Grove, 2918 (Bus. No.) 
Carter, Chiton, 617 Emberton, rompkinsville, Hu 7-5686 
Carter, James Anderson, Route 2, Carlisle, 26M, 1 
Cassady, Cnarles W., 1127 Kentucky, Bowling Green, Vi 3-9538 
Cales, Vernon K., Sedalia 

Chattin, Ernie P., 2147 Central, Ashland, 1008, East 4-6191 
Clark, Owen, Route 3, Georgetown 
Cocanougher, Robert, 468 W. Broadway, Danville, 2434, 1900, 

Ext. 26 
Cole, Harold, Heidrick, 621-L, 341 

Collins, Bill, Hamilton St., K. A. House, Georgetown, 735 
Conley, Ted Lynn, 3227^1 Walters Hill Dr., Ashland, East 4-2912 
Conley, Tom, W., Rt. 23, Paintsville, 542 (Bus. No.) 
Cook, Max Wheeler, P. O. Box 189, Murray, 76 (Bus. No.) 
Copley, Sidney M., Elkhorn City, 4151, 3401 
Coryell, Francis W., 162 Francis, Louisville, Em 3-5892 
Coudret, Raymond Joe, 843 E. Gum, Evansville, Ind., Ha 2-1462 
Cox. Rufus A., 223 Rutter, Earlington, Du 3-4001, Du 3-3301 
Coy, Hugh M., 316 South Second, Richmond. 842 
Crank, Buck, 3010V- Lock Ave., Catlettsburg, 54 (Bus. No.) 
Crawford, Donald R., Easum Rd., Jeffei-sontown, An 7 1937 
Daniels, Bob, Sacramento 

Davenport, Bobby Jack, P. O. Box 204, Williamsburg, 6531 
Davis, Donald, 39 Harrison, Bellevue, Ju 1-9813, Co 1-2980 
Davis, Donald, West Irvine, 441-R 

Derrick, Charles A., 347 Linden, Southgate, Hi 1-5073, Ju 1-2366 
DeMoisey, J. Fo.x, 227 Highland Ave., Ft. Thomas, Hi 1-0795, 

Hi 1-0795 
Dobson, Kenneth, 416i/i S. 10th, Mayfield. 1193, Tilghman 

Trade School 
Duerson, Guy K., Jr., Richmond Rd., Berea, 285, 184 
Elrod, Richard L., Route 1, Box 14, Portsmouth, Ohio, Ul 8-5366 
Estes, A. D., 202 Riverside Dr., Owensboro, Mu 3-2336 
Eversoie, Oscar, 812 E. Main, Lexington 
Farley, James F., 608 Grant, Danville, 2495 
Farmer, John Clay "Jack," 122 N. First St., Danville, 1591-W, 

2192 
Foster, William R. "Bob", Science Hill, 234, 19 
Garland, Harrold Wade, 620 Broad, Murray, 1796 
Gates. Thomas F., Route 6, Hopkinsville, Tu 6-2837 
Gibson, Romulus D., Box 212, Campbellsville. 8182-W 
Giese, Richard E., 93-A Wherry, Ft. Campbell, 3813 (Bus. No.) 
Gillette, Bob, 702C Warrendale, Georgetown, 826 
Giordano, Al, 113 N. 14th St., Murray, 1754 
Goodin, Charles L., Summit Dr., Pineville, ED 7-2365. ED 7-2151 
Goranflo, Robert E., 133 Bonner, Louisville, Tw 52805, Ch 54161 
Gover, Robert J., 622 E. 13th, Bowling Green, 3-8431 
Grace, Hickory E., Jr., Middlesboro, 413 J 
Graham. James E., 2424 Adams, Ashland, 4-8169 
Gray, Raymond. Island, Hu 6-2161 

Greathouse, Bobby, Old Scottsville Rd., Bowling Green, Vi 2-2568 
Green, Walter, Jr., 1028i/., Corbin, 2377, 465 
Grisham, Jesse R., 1627 Roosevelt, Henderson, Va 7-1035 
Hagerdorn, Thomas, 116 Electric Ave., Southgate, Hi 1-5222, 

Hi 1-9931 
Hardin, Don, R. F. D. 1, Morehead, 886 
Hallinan, Garland R., 702 A Warrendale. Georgetown 
Hammond, William, 16 Walnut, Berea, 104 W, 820 
Hargis, Bobby S., Box 6, Calvert City, Ex 5-4849 
Hawkins. Robert W., Echo Lane, Madisonville, Taylor 1-6118, 

Tavlor 1-2990 
Hendrix. Jack, P. O. Box 235, London 
Hesse, Robert E., 611 N. 39th St. Louisville, Sp 8-8562, 

Ju 4-3211. Ext. 324 or 334 
Higgir.s, Bobby D., P. O. Box 133, Slaughters 
Hils, M. David, 1547 Dana, Cincinnati, Ohio, RE 1-9349, 

PA 1-4040 
Hill, Earl F., General Delivery, London, 637 L 
Hobbs, Charles V.. 2121 Main, Westwood, Ashland, Ea 4-9439, 

Ea 4-2176 
Hofstetter, Joe, Box 2173. Williamson, W. Va. 
Holzknecht, George, 2902 Miles Rd., Louisville. Gl 8-5661 
Horton, John, Shearer Apt's No. 7, Monticello, 328-B, 328-B 
Hoskins, Charles. 2922 Finn, Louisville 
Hughes, Charles F., Wayland, 4881, 3491 
Huntsman, Bill. 114 Doris Ave., Glasgow, Olive 1-5440, 

Olive 1-2295 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1957 



Page Five 



Hurd, Fred, Clinton, 6440, 2381 

Huter, James J., 3506 Vermont Ave., Louisville, Spring 8-3891, 

2271 Henryville, Ind. 
Ison, G. B., Flemingsburg, 61B1, 4431 
James, Gene, 315 Parlt Ave., Ironton, Ohio, 4533, 3699 
Jenkins, E. E., 129 Second St., Silver Grove, Hi 1-1603 
Jones, Charles "Junior", 2834 Yorkshire Blvd., Louisville, 

Gl 8-1293, Atherton High School 
Jones, Robert E., 220 W. 5th, Winona, Minn., 2291, 3059 
Jones, Eobert T., 286 Nesbit St., Madisonville, TA 1-5066 

(Bus. No.J 
Judy, Eussell Max, Box 207, Millersburg, 4425 
Kelly, Callis, Volga, Paintsville 1011, (Bus. No.) 
Lambert, Kenneth L., 2221 Bayard Pk. Dr., Evansville, Ind., 

GR 66146, HA 65252 
LeFevers, Jasper, Jr., Cardinal 

Lentz Charles E., R. F. D. 6, Benton, La 7-7447, La 7-6431 
Leonhardt. A. C, 1417 Oleanda Ave., Louisville, Em 6-1919, 

Ju 62211, Ext. 697 
Lequire, Harold Monroe, "Buckett", North Main, Harlan, 

1123 193 
McAninch, E. R., Liberty, 33241 
McBride, Kenneth W., 157 St. William Dr., Lexinton, 4-8287, 

3-3335 
McCargo, Frank, R. F. D. 2, Hopkinsville, 6-4532, 6-9400 
McCord, Coleman, 981 Delia Dr., Lexington, 4-9327, 4-2880 
McDowell, Pat Ed, Ky. Wesleyan College, Men's Dormitory, 

Owensboro, Mu 45261, Ext. 12 
Mahurin, Larry R., M. S. C, P. O. Box 416, Murray, Tu 4-4378 
Maines, George, 44 Clover St., Erlanger, Di 1-7460, Co 1-8120 
Manasco, Estel N., Austin Peay State College, Clarksville, Tenn. 
Marks, Howard R., 2425 S. York St., Owensboro, Mu 3-0643, 

RE 3-4421 
May, Harold M., 251 N. 3rd., Danville, 2566, 1400, Ext. 37 
Mazza, Albert, "Babe," Glenroy Dr., North Kenova, Ohio, 44626 
Meeks, Jack, 407 6th St., Corbin, 415, 661 
Miller, John D., Austin Peay State College, Clarksville, Tenn. 

5-5525 (Bus. No.) 
Miller Kenneth H.,' Apt. 89 E. Gaffey Hts., Ft. Knox, 5757 

(Bus. No.) 
Miller, Rex J., 2711 Greenway Ed., Ashland, Ea 45023, Ea 46641 
Mills, Herman, Lovely 

Mitchell, Jimmie, R. F. D. 2, Nortonville, Or 6-3272 
Mobley, Tony, 206 S. Hamilton, Georgetown, 1184 
Molen, James P., 102 Richardson Dr., Somerset, 894 L, 1567 E 
Morris, Rodney A., Route 4, Bowling Green, Vi 2-5764 (Bus. No.) 
Moser, Emerson, E. F. D. 2, Sebree, 2181 (Bus. No.) 
Newton, Reason G., Lebanon Junction, Temple 3-4683 
O'Connell, Jim, 404 S. Grand Ave., Ft. Thomas, Hi 1-2150, 

Di 1-9891 
O'Nan, Eugene, Route 3, Henderson, 7-9077, 6-9223 
Owens, Homer, Elkhorn City 

Page, Jimmie Dale, Star Route, Mayfield, FA 8-3487 
Parrott, Lanny L., 508 N. Columbia Ave., Campbellsville, 

138 J, 579 
Partridge, Donald E., 1621 N. Willow Rd., Evansville, Ind., 

Ha 41566, HA 51092 
Patton, John "B.", 1419 McHenry, Louisville, Me 4-3828, 

Ju 2-3511, Ext. 282 
Payne, Gayle H., Bethlehem, Pleasureville 2266 
Peden, Harlan, Perryville, 3311 (Bus. No.) 
Peeno, Harry R., 422 Oak St., Ludlow, Ju 1-7335 
Perry, James R., P. 0. Box 205, West Liberty, Sh 3-4971, 

Sh 3-4275 
Philpot, Kelsey Edward, P. O. Box 181, Williamsburg, 6686 
Poppas, Nickolas, Box 215, Blue Diamond, 1829 
Powell, Pat E., R. F. D. 1, Eadcliff, Ft. Knox 6630 (Bus. No.) 
Presson, Jim, No. 25 Orch. Hts., Murray 
Pursifull, Cleophus, Loyall, 1110 
Pyle, George E., 1607 Phelps Ave., Hopkinsville, Tu 6-1855, 

Tu 5-3485 
Eains, Darrell, P. O. Box 22, Emlyn 
Randolph, Donald M., 1623 Aletha Dr., Louisville 13, Okol. 

96359, Okol 95145 
Eatterman, Bernard W., Jr., 510 Dale Ave., Louisville, Em 

6-6909, Ju 71241, Ext. 6274 
Eay, Frankie, 316 Vets Village, P. O. Box 249, Richmond, 

244 (Bus. No.) 
Eeinhardt, Myron S., 1443 N. Ft. Thomas Ave., Ft. Thomas, 

Highland 1-3730, Myrtle 7-8081 
Reliford, Paul, Eoute 2, Ashland, Ea 5-2109 
Richardson, Joe M., 210 York, Greenville, 1077 W, 48 
Eiggins, Jason, IV, W. 6th Ave., Williamson. W. Va. 
Ring, William H., 107 Watson Court, Frankfort, Ca 7-4096, 

Ca 7-2281, Ext. 403 
Eitter, Goebel, 101 Wooton St., Hazard, 836, 365 
Eoark, Paul Glenn, Linefork 
Roark, Van Venson, Linefork 

Eoberts, Bob, 215 Southport Dr., Lexington, 2-6495, 5-2020 
Eobertson, Lee, 108 Shelia Dr., Glasgow, 01 1-3400, 01 1-3787 
Eocke, James M., 10 Lewis Circle, Erlanger, Di 19082, Ax 12523 



Rothfuss, Richard, 37 Gregory Lane, Ft. Thomas, Hi 19190 

Rozen, Morris, Richmond, 18592, 2038 

Salyer, Paul H., Box 995, Salyersville, Fireside 9-4623 

Sarr, Richard, 630 Seattle Dr., Lexington, 22240, Ext. 211 

(Bus. No.) 
Saylor, Gene, 76 Field St., Cumberland, 6E 
Sexton, William L., 324 4th Ave., Dayton, HE 15941, MA 1-4321, 

Line 40 
Shaw, Earl, 109 Hill Court, Lancaster, 524, Bry 2208 
Shelton, Robert, 515 Pelham, Maysville, LO 4-4031 
Shoupe, Edgar, 132 Holly, Pineville, Edgewood 7-2179 
Shuck, Thomas G., 960 Stonewall, Lexington. 24635, 24635 
Siler, Clarence M., 8th St., & Cumberland Ave., Williamsburg, 

6188 
Simms, Wavelan J., Jr., Co B Sp Tng Eegt USATCA, Fort 

Knox, 6033, 2648 
Simpson, Paul D., North 9th St., Williamsburg, 6607, 5601, 

6125 
Small Rex, 300 E. 27th, Owensboro, Mu 4-2845, Mu 3-2431 
Small, Wm. W., Jr., "Bill", 1846 Mary Catherine Dr., Louis- 
ville 16, Em 8-8365, Hi. 4900 
Smith, David V.'., 8107 Eory Way, Louisville, 19, Wo 9-0060, 

Gl 8-6369 
Smith, Eurie Hayes, 3730 Taylorsville Ed., Louisville, GL 40374, 

GL 40374 
Smith, Eurie H. Ill, 3730 Taylorsville Rd., Louisville, GL 40374, 

GL 40374 
Smith, Wayne N., Cane Valley, Fulton 4-3165 
Smith, Willard N., Cane Valley, Fulton 4-3165 
Sosh, La Rue, Third Street, Uniontown, 1, 200 
Sosh, Nelson, Third Street, Uniontown. 123, 200 
Spencer, Edward, Booneville 
Spencer, Irvin E., 1811 Duboury Ave., Louisville 16, Sp 8-6281, 

We 7-2300 
Spurlock, Ralph, Cawood, 695-R, 334 or 335 
Stahl, Francis, 224 W. Third St., Maysville, LO 4-6393 
Stamper, Eobert L., Morehead, 500 W, 194 or 195 
Starns, Harry Thomas, 170 Forest Ave., Lexington, 24326 
Stovall, John A., Lasiter Apfs, 16th St., Murray, 1664 W 
Swope, William, 406 Breckinridge, Lexington, 63698 
Taylor, Carl, Route 3, Box 250, Corbin, 1718 
Thoma, M. L., 103 Holly, Berea, 620 
Thomas, William G., 764 N. Seminary, Madisonville, Ta 1-2983 

Ta 1-4144 
Tincher, Robert, Nashville Ed., Bowling Green, Vi 3-3380, 

Vi 2-1681 
Tindall, Gene D., Route 3, Shelbyville, 962 M2, 1214 
Tolbert. John Louis, 2769 Greenup Ave., Ashland, Ea 6-1016 
Torian, Virgil, Jr., 1107 East First, Hopkinsville, Tu 5-5457, 

Tu 6-2866 
Turner, Bruce, 203 E. 19th St., Paris, 534, 9060 
Turner, Thomas, 79 Washington Ave., Glendale, Ohio, Pr 

1-6055, Po 1-4100, Line 1329 
Tye, Bobby R., 129 Pine St., Pineville, 7-2090 
Van Meter, Kaye Don, Bee Spring, Ly 73676, Ly 73605 
Vance, Earl G., 304 Norris Ct., Glasgow, 3083, 6205 
Van Zant, Jim, 502 Prichard St., Williamson, W. Va. 
Waddell, William R., 4719 Granada, Valley Station, We 71289 
Waggoner, Philip, Wingo 
Waldon, Tot, Bandana, Ca 4-2335 
Walker, Lawrence I., 5402 Bold Venture Rd., Valley Station, 

Louisville We 73841, Ft. Knox 2832 
Wallen, Edgar, 2226 Bath Ave.. Ashland, Ea 4-5834 (Bus. No.) 
Walters, Jim, Lothair, North 340, 177 Hazard 
Watkins, Byron C, P. O. Box 120, Cave City, PE 3-2491, 

PR 3-7951 
Webb, Oren H., Sweeden, Ly. 6-2151 (Bus. No.) 
Weisbrodt. Paul E., 350 Stratford, Lexington, 2-7569, 4-6666 
Westoff, Eobert A., 26 St. Jude's Ct., Florence 
White, David B., 1325 Kentucky, Bowling Green, Vi 3-4331 

(Bus. No.) 
White, James, Box 881, Lynch 

vVhite, Robert C, 116 S. 24th, Middlesboro, 617, 366 
Whitfield, Eobert B., Ky. Wesleyan College, Men's Dormitory, 

Owensboro, Mu 4-5261, Ext. 12 
Willett, Arthur G., 3808 Nanz, Louisville, Tw 5-0715, Ju 4-9011, 

Ext. 36 
Williams, Tom M., 116 E. Broadway, Bardstown, Fieldbrook 

8-3079, Ch 9-3267 
Willis, Donald, P. O. Box 689, Pikeville, 421 M 
Wilson, Jack R., 2220 Sharon Ed., Ashland, Ea 4-1234, Ea 5-1611 
Willson, Martin Wayne, E. F. D. 3, Dixon 
Witschger, LeRoy J., 8400 Forest, Cincinnati 30, Ohio, Be 

1-5859, KL 1-6600, Line 666 
Witt, Fred, Whitesburg, 266 I 
Woerner, Eobert Fredericik. 10117 Grand, Jeffersontown, 

An 7-1174, Sp. 7-2475 
Wright, Larry LaRue. Salt Lick, Or 4-2585 



Young, Coleman L., 340 Vet Village, Eichmond 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1957 



The Flying Dutchman 

The greatest nightmare of a preacher, a 
politician or a clinic director is laryngitis. 
While conducting the Indiana clinic at In- 
dianapolis, just one day before the start of 
the Kentucky clinics, the Hoosier flu germs 
invaded this Kentucky Colonel's throat. The 
following night at the first clinic in Louis- 
ville, those coaches and officials took a beat- 
ing listening to the raspy, scarcely audible 
voice of your Flying Dutchman. 

All might have been lost for this year's 
clinics had not "Old Doc" Theodore A. San- 
ford, who prescribes athletic remedies for 
Kentucky from his Commissioner's office, 
come to the rescue by supplying a throat con- 
coction which he guarantees cures everything 
from laryngitis to lockjaw. He calls the cure- 
all "Shy Low." Believe me, after a couple of 
doses, no throat can afford laryngitis. So it 
is that we owe a lot to "Shy Low," "Doc", and 
to his assistant, Joe Billy Mansfield, who 
made the 1900-mile sashay around Kentucky 
insisting on my taking the mixture of "who- 
knows-what" regularly. 

Be certain of one thing, the youthful As- 
sistant Commissioner has a knack for mak- 
ing friends wherever he goes. Kentucky now 
has two mountainous sections, one being the 
natural Kentucky mountains in the eastern 
section, and the other the "mountain of 
friends" which Joe Billy created in Western 
Kentucky. Everybody liked the close contact 
with the liason-man for the K.H.S.A.A. of- 
fice in Lexington. He did a tremendous job 
of disseminating information all along the 
route. 

To say that the clinic crowds were large 
would be putting the whole issue too mildly. 
Roughly, 2500 coaches, officials, players, 
cheerleaders and spectators were on hand. 
There has never been more interest mani- 
fested in any year than this. Coaches joined 
with officials in studying the rules, discuss- 
ing them and reaching a common understand- 
ing. The union of coaches and officials at the 
meetings can only mean better relationships 
between these two fraternities. 

Not only were officials present from Ken- 
tucky, but there were several hundred who 
attended from six other states, namely, Il- 
linois, Tennessee, Ohio, Indiana, West Vir- 
ginia and Virginia. Whenever seven states 
can join together in clinic discussions, old 
barriers start tumbling and interstate friend- 
ships flourish where animosities formerly 
existed. It's not difficult to reach uniformity 



when such representative groups sit down 
and discuss things in friendly meetings. 

We learned that Winchester's former 
coach, Eck Braham, had left the Bluegrass 
when he turned up as the coach of North 
Warren at the Bowling Green clinic ; and that 
Shorty Jamerson, who was at the Pikeville 
clinic last year, showed up at the clinic as the 
coach of Glasgow High School; and then we 
observed also that Bobby Watson, former 
U. of K. "flash", was trying on Lawrence 
McGinnis' big coaching shoes at Owensboro. 

Nobody could help noticing little Nick 
Poppas, who the Dutchman claims is the 
smallest basketball official in the world with 
the biggest heart, passing out cigars in the 
Hazard clinic. Nick and his attractive wife, 
Eula, were boasting the arrival that day of 
a new five-pound boy whom they are calling 
Michael. Nick says that Michael will join his 
four year old brother, Stephen Cooper Pop- 
pas, in Nick's private school for basketball 
officials to perpetuate the Poppas philosophy 
of officiating. Incidentally, Stephen Cooper 
Poppas is named for the former Morehead 
great, Warren Cooper. 

We also learned that Kentucky is about to 
suffer a big loss in its officiating ranks. 
Johnny Crosthwaite is to be transferred from 
Harlan to Big Stone Gap, Virginia. Johnny, 
who possesses one of the sharpest athletic 
minds in Kentucky, has served the K.H.S. 
A.A. as Regional Clinic Director ever since 
"Tater" Combs moved out of the educational 
field and accumulated a fortune. A look at 
the new salary Johnny will command at his 
Big Stone Gap post is enough to convince us 
that he is about to amass another one of 
those "Combs Fortunes." 

We had lost track of Kenny Reeves, former 
U. of L. star who learned his high school 
basketball under the personable Earl Jones, 
of Maysville. We found him again at the 
clinic at Bell County High outside of Pine- 
ville. Kenny has opened up his dentist's of- 
fice in Pineville, and is officiating just to 
keep close contact with the game he loves. 
One thing is a lead-pipe cinch. If Dr. Kenny 
Reeves is as accurate with his drill as he was 
with his jump shot, there won't be many 
tooth cavities left in Bell County! 

While we were traveling in the mountains, 
the ghost of last year's awful flood was 
present. Admiring the wonderful recovery 
those mountain towns have made and re- 
membering as we conducted the Pikeville 
clinic that the flood waters had swirled 
angrily through that same gymnasium and 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1957 



Page Seven 



had made homeless hundreds of Pikeville 
citizens, it just seemed right that Russ Wil- 
hamson should present Coach John Bill 
Trivette the Flying Dutchman's Corn Cob 
Pipe of Honor Award for all he did to allev- 
iate suffering during that trying time. 

John Bill promoted benefit basketball 
games to bring thousands of dollars into 
flood relief in his city and it was also Coach 
Trivette who gathered up clothes of all kinds 
while his team was playing in the Louisville 
Invitational Tournament to take back to his 
suffering friends in Pikeville. Nobody ever 
deserved the Corn Cob Pipe of Honor more 
for unselfish service to his fellowman. 

Watch your Sunday Courier-Journal for 
the magazine article which Joe Creason is 
writing on the basketball clinics. Photograph- 
ers were dispatched to various clinic towns 
to get a pictorial study of the annual training 
sessions which do so much to keep basketball 
the popular sport it is. This story will be 
widely read and will add many friends to Joe 
Creason's ever growing list. Joe is heartily 
liked right straight across the Common- 
wealth. 

Speaking of friends, the Dutchman has 
just come to the realization that he must 
have a hundred friends in the state. That 
many people have already phoned in requests 
to the N.C.A.A. Tournament being played in 
Louisville in March. Your old Dutch friend 
wrote a check for $1,000 to "ice" these tickets 
away so his friends would have the best seats 
in the house. Bill Henry, affable Sports 
Director of the Kentucky State Fair and Ex- 
position Center, has been pulling on that 
check now for weeks, wondering if it is 
elastic. 

Attention, all coaches and officials of the 
eastern section of Kentucky! When the 
Dutchman returned from his eastern swing 
of the clinics, he had a telephone conversa- 
tion with H. V. Porter, National Rules inter- 
preter of Chicago, and was informed that if 
both teams appeared wearing illegal numbers, 
there must be one technical foul shot by 
Team A, one technical foul shot by Team B, 
followed by a jump ball at center between 
any two opponents. On my tour, I told you 
that this would be a double foul with no shots 
involved. Your Dutch friend just did some- 
thing no official has ever been guilty of. 
He made a mistake! 



Here and There 

TRACK AND FIELD: The new 1958 
edition of the Track and Field Rules Book 
is being published about December 1. It will 
include records of all 1957 state meets, all 
rules revisions, the honor roll of best per- 
formers for 1957, an up-to-date list of Na- 
tional Interscholastic records and a section 
devoted to Junior College performances. 
Most of the rules revisions are of a technical 
nature but a few are of interest to all track 
followers. Unless announced otherwise in 
advance, three places will be counted in a 
dual meet and four in either a triangular or 
quadrangular meet. To avoid possible inter- 
locking of hurdles when lanes are 42 inches 
wide, the top bar may now be 41 inches wide, 
instead of the previous minimum of 42 
inches. Either vertical or diagonal stripes 
may be used. For the shot put or discus 
throw, a concrete surface with a roughness 
of 1/64 inch is recommended, but is not 
mandatory). Experimentation with a high 
school discus with a slightly thinner rim for 
easier grip and better control is authorized. 
The distance it can be thrown is not different 
from the currently used discus. 

The Track and Field Records Committee 
has now given a decision on the application 
for national record made in behalf of two 
California boys who ran the 100-yard dash 
in 9.4 seconds in a dead heat. This is equal 
to the time of Jesse Owens in 1933. At the 
meeting of the Records Committee in June, 
action on the application was delayed pend- 
ing further collection of facts. Further study 
of the conditions revealed that there was 
some difference of opinion as to the wind 
velocity at the time of the race and as to the 
type of measuring device which was used. 
The Records Committee has voted that the 
performance, although outstanding and re- 
markable, cannot be accepted as a national 
record. 

BASEBALL: A report to the Joint Base- 
ball Committee indicates a continued steady 
growth in interest in high school baseball. 
Public interest has been attracted by un- 
usual performers who have gone from high 
school teams directly to a major league team. 
Illustrations are the McDaniel boys of the 
St. Louis Cardinals. Each year there have 
been a few such cases but those of the cur- 
rent season have been more numerous or 
more widely publicized. It is not the primary 
purpose of the high school program to pro- 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1957 



duce professional baseball players. Such pro- 
duction is a by-product which, for some boys, 
may be desirable just as it may be desirable 
for a machine shop graduate to accept a good 
available position after graduation. A rule 
of thumb procedure does not fit all cases. 
In each case, the value of continuance in 
college must be weighed against related fac- 
tors, including possible opportunities at a 
later date for using talent which may dimin- 
ish rapidly as time passes. 

For most individuals, high school baseball 
is an avocational interest which offers in- 
centive for keeping in good physical and 
mental condition, a chance for enjoyable 
competition and an opportunity to develop 
interests which will provide satisfaction 
throughout life, even after the days of active 
participation are in the past. The contribu- 
tion to general welfare is great enough to 
warrant rejoicing in the expansion of the 
program which has doubled the number of 
participating high school teams in the last 
ten or fifteen years. 

SERVED WITH TRIMMINGS: A school 
contest without some organized cheering 
would be in a class with a merry-go-round 
without a calliope or a salad without the 
dressing. The extent to which cheering con- 
tributes to the known advantage of playing 
on the home field or court may be debatable 
but any experienced administrator knows 
that the psychological effect on spectators is 
great. At its best, cheerleading is one of the 
most effective means of maintaining good 
crowd conduct. At its worst, it is a rabble 
rousing provoker of mass hysteria. School 
administrators, recognizing the importance 
of this activity, have, through the State High 
School Association, sponsored a program 
for training leaders. During October and 
early November, Michigan held four cheer- 
leadmg clinics. The instructor was Newt 
Loken, Gymnastic and Cheerleading Coach 
at University of Michigan. Minnesota has a 
well established series of clinics which have 
beer; conducted by L. R. Herkimer of Dallas, 
Texas. Ohio inaugurated a state-wide clinic 
last year and found difficulty in finding a 
place large enough to accommodate the par- 
ticipants. Kansas, Iowa, Illinois, North Da- 
kota, Kentucky, Tennessee and other states 
have a series of clinics. 

EXCERPTS: From Minnesota Handbook 
(Editorial by President A. J. Cole)— "If there 
is one thing that we need more than any 
other, it is the constant emphasis among 
our citizens of that spirit of fair play. It is 



that willingness to give and take, that gen- 
erosity in defeat, and that lack of boastful- 
ness in victory by which we identify a true 
sportsman. The victories and defeats of play 
in student days should be used to strengthen 
the fiber of character for withstanding the 
victories and defeats of adult life." 

From Indiana Handbook (Editorial by 
President Loren Chastain) — "The greatest 
problem we are now facing is public relations. 
For example, with approximately four hun- 
dred basketball games in Indiana every Fri- 
day evening during the season involving hun- 
dreds of thousands of people, the importance 
and responsibility of guiding their thinking 
and conduct along proper lines becomes ex- 
ceedingly great. It is a challenge to our lead- 
ers to handle public relations so as to main- 
tain the good will of our public and use it in 
developing our athletic program. I am sure 
we shall, with the cooperation of all, meet 
this responsibility." 



Guest Editorials 

New Challenges 

In the face of new challenges to world 
peace and a free international order, educa- 
tors and statesmen are increasingly recon- 
sidering certain comfortable assumptions 
which have influenced a considerable amount 
of our thinking. Such as assumptions of 
hemispheric security, and of an orderly world 
in which nations respect each other's integ- 
rity and conduct their national affairs ac- 
cording to law and morality. 

In the light of what we have experienced 
in the last fifteen years, there is little doubt 
of the infiltration of ideologies which clash 
with principles we hold fundamental to in- 
dividual freedom and happiness. 

It is increasinly more difficult for school- 
men and legislators to distinguish between 
responsibility of the school and the responsi- 
bility of other agencies. 

The school can no longer hope to meet its 
responsibilities to the local community and 
to the State by limiting its influence to for- 
mal instruction in the confines of the class- 
room. The school plant, which includes its 
library, stadium, auditorium, gymnasium, 
recreation and social facilities, as well as 
classrooms, must inevitably become the cen- 
ter in which a constantly expanding program 
of youth-development is being planned and 
advanced. 

Accordingly, the school's offering must 
include every opportunity for youth to be 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1957 



Page Nine 



■guided adequately, to experience the kind of 
educational program which will benefit him 
most, to participate in non-academic pro- 
grams which will create satisfactory civic 
attitudes, and to participate in controlled 
athletic activities which will promote mental 
agility and physical strength. Educational 
organizations frequently establish objectives 
which they seek to achieve solely through the 
school's formal academic program. We are 
fast realizing that these objectives can not be 
attained under the conditions which create 
the environment of much of our high school 
population. 

The P.I.A.A., with its broad program, is 
only one of the many agencies directing its 
efforts towards a fuller development of 
American youth. 

Occasionally we hear that sports build 
character. We really mean that fair play, the 
fundamental principle we have tried to in- 
corporate into all our games, turns mere 
competitive effort into character-molding ex- 
periences. Suffice to say, life is more than a 
game, and outstanding character is more 
than sportsmanship; but athletics can make 
its contribution to both of these attributes. 
— Dr. Frank P. Mcguire in the Pa'thlete 



Moving an Injured Player 

A physician should be present at all athletic 
contests in which the injury hazard is great. 
One of the attending doctor's responsibilities 
is to supervise the moving of an injured 
player when this is necessary. However, ser- 
ious injuries occur in practice and sometimes 
in sports where injury is not generally anti- 
cipated. At such times it may be necessary 
to move the injured player, but it is usually 
best to do so only on a doctor's instructions. 

Student managers as well as coaches and 
other faculty members connected with sports 
should be well grounded in correct first-aid 
procedures, including proper methods of 
transportation (See Chapter on Transporta- 
tion, American Red Cross First Aid Text- 
book). Players, too, should have a basic un- 
derstanding of first aid practices. 

Don't be hurried into moving an athlete 
who has been hurt; few injuries require 
breakneck speed. Particularly when there is 
any suspicion of a neck or back injury, the 
game and crowd can wait. Remember the 
first-aid admonition: "Improper or careless 
methods frequently increase the severity of 
the injury and may even cause death." 

In body-contact sports an inconspicuously- 
placed stretcher is a practical necessity. Hav- 



ing an established procedure to promptly ob- 
tain needed ambulance service is equally im- 
portant. 

Written step-by-step directions to follow 
when an injured athlete must be moved are 
a protection to the school as well as the 
players themselves. Representatives of your 
local medical society can help you develop 
such "standing orders" which fit the needs 
of the local situation. 

TO TEAM ATTENDANTS: UNDER NO 
CONDITIONS MOVE AN ATHLETE WITH- 
OUT MEDICAL SUPERVISION WHO IS 
UNABLE TO MOVE AN EXTREMITY. 
THIS IS A SIGN OF EITHER A NECK OR 
SPINAL INJURY— POSSIBLY A FRAC- 
TURE. MOVING A PLAYER WITH SUCH 
AN INJURY MAY CAUSE FURTHER 
DAMAGE AND RESULT IN PERMANENT 
DISABILITY OR EVEN DEATH. 

— National Federation in cooperation with A.M.A. 



Philosophy and/or Practice 

All educators, be they young and enthu- 
siastic, venerable in their vast experience 
and self-assured, academicians or pragmat- 
ists, agree that for one to do his best in any 
area, he must enjoy a modest degree of good 
health. It is universally agreed that an adult 
is more likely to be healthy, if he is healthy 
as a child. There is general agreement, also, 
for the idea that an active vigorous child is 
more likely to be healthy than an inert one. 
The solid backing of educators is overwhelm- 
ing, when questioned as to the worth of 
health instruction and physical education as 
a means of bringing about such changes as 
will help youngsters to develop good hygiene 
practices and good strong bodies. Up to this 
point, philosophical points meet on common 
ground. We are in accord. 

The test of the philosophy, the evidence of 
which should be the utilization of these fine 
ideas in the schools across the land, somehow 
never made the grade. In some quarters it 
is said to involve too much expense. Conse- 
quently, not until our child has stumbled 
through the first six years of formal educa- 
tion does he begin to be exposed to many of 
the physical experiences he could have profit- 
ed from during those earlier years. Unless he 
is so fortunate as to have parents who send 
him to one of the few "do-it-with-your- 
muscles" camps, buy him a YMCA member- 
ship, or a big brother who can do things and 
undertakes to teach him, our youngster is 
retarded physically. Certainly there are 
children whose very need for activity will 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1957 



drive them to improvise, some of that play 
is good, some of it hazardous. We all remem- 
ber how we mimicked the neighborhood ath- 
lete, or our favorite among the professionals. 
That is all to the good, as far as it goes, but 
most of us also remember how very difficult 
it was to unlearn some skill we had picked 
up, and relearn the correct way of perform- 
ing. All that psychological trauma could have 
been avoided if we had been taught, and 
taught correctly. What is worse, many young 
people become embarrassed at their lack of 
the proper skill and give up trying. Those 
are the persons who become the confirmed 
spectators, or become bitterly opposed to see- 
ing young studnts "wasting their time" at 
sports activity. Expose every one to a well- 
planned, intelligently administered program 
and much of the lack of understanding and 
appreciation will have been avoided. 

Most of us were denied such a privilege, 
because then, as now, those best qualified 
to teach physical education skills are to be 
found in the larger universities and colleges. 
As we descend the scale of those institutions 
interested in offering physical programs, we 
find most really capable persons in the other 
institutions of higher learning, and in the 
secondary schools. In city systems, and con- 
solidated situations, the junior high student 
is getting something that may resemble a 
physical program. Only in a few isolated in- 
stances are those who need it most getting 
the benefit of any real physical instruction. 

We have started our building from the top. 
There is a well constructed penthouse, away 
up there in the clouds. The levels directly 
under it are quite nice also. The trouble with 
our structure is that the ground floor and 
the basement are practically non-existent. 
Those who make their way to the upper 
floors exhibit a high degree of innate ability 
and ingenuity. They get no help from those 
of us who have created this top-heavy, base- 
mentless structure. For future generations 
we can make it easier, and the ascent more 
fruitful. We can jack up the structure, as it 
is, and put the foundation structures in place. 
True, that is the hard way, but who is going 
to suggest demolishing the entire structure. 

Once we have begun work, we can also in- 
clude some desirable renovations on parts of 
the intermediate levels. These are long over 
due. All of the technical knowledge is at 
hand. We have the tools necessary. We may 
be a bit short of technicians, but the renova- 
tions on some of the upper levels will provide 
the extra training needed to do the job at 



hand. The changes are important because we 
have had ample evidence that too many 
young people, left to develop on their own, 
have not made desirable progress in the right 
direction. They need help. 

There is also some evidence that their 
mental health status is suffering. It cannot 
be said that all of the unrest and social de- 
viation is due to the lack of knowledge of 
wholesome activities, but there is more than 
a little concrete evidence that such activities 
are very functional as tension and pressure 
relieving agencies. The boy, or girl, who gives 
enough time and energy to physical activity 
to get the best out of it is seldom disturbed 
enough to be termed delinquent. 

Let us put our superior educational con- 
cepts to work. Let's start down in the base- 
ment, the kindergarten, and lead those chil- 
dren up the stairs to healthier, more func- 
tional bodies. It just might be worth the 
time and effort, we too, must put into the 
development. It is conceivable that they will 
be appreciative, when they will have learned 
to do things well. I wonder who the young 
people are holding responsible that many of 
them failed the recent fitness tests? They 
may not live longer, but they will live better 
and be more happy while they are yet alive. 
— Dr. E. Preston in Delaware Bulletin. 



Amateurism and School Athletics 

The only remaining simon-pure amateur 
program left in America today is the high 
school athletic program. It is extremely dif- 
ficult to preserve our amateur program as 
some group or individual is always attempt- 
ing to undermine it in whole or part. 

The only thing that has kept our Amateur 
Code so high is the unanimity of opinion 
among educators that the high school ath- 
letic program must remain amateur in scope 
if it is to be justifiable as a part of the sec- 
ondary curriculum. If it is not a part of the 
educational experience provided by the school 
then it is impossible to defend an inter- 
school athletic program. 

All state high school athletic associations, 
which are, in reality, operated under direc- 
tives from school men, say that scholastic 
athletics must be amateur. It is true that the 
definition of amateurism varies from state to 
state, but all the definitions include the phil- 
osophy that those who play shall not receive 
pay or valuable consideration for it. 

In our modern society which stresses the 
"almighty" dollar over ethical, moral and 
educational values it may be heresy to say 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1957 



Page Eleven 



that the Greeks had a word for it. Greek 
athletes participated for fun, for pure enjoy- 
ment, for the thrill of competition, and as one 
great Olympian champion said : "I go forth to 
excel or else to give someone else an oppor- 
tunity to excel." 

In general, schools desire to keep their 
athletes from using their athletic skill as a 
means of livelihood or incidental remunera- 
tion. It appears that athletics with a place in 
the educational system must be kept amateur 
in nature. It is a proven fact that inter-school 
relations are superior if the students com- 
prising the athletic teams are bona fide 
amateur students. A program based on any 
other foundation than amateurism will ulti- 
mately result in the demise of the inter- 
school athletic program. Therefore, adminis- 
trators, coaches, teachers, and lay persons 
who realize the tremendous educational ex- 
periences found in our athletic program must 
constantly make a concerted effort to keep 
our high school athletic program simon-pure. 

— Dr. Rhea H. Williams in the Texas Int. Leaguer. 



Join The "ABC" 

What is it? 

It's the "ANTI-BOOERS' CLUB." 
Booing is unsportsmanlike and should be 
taboo in all amateur sports, and particularly 
in all inter-school activities. The individual 
who "boos," no matter what the provocation, 
shows 

disrespect for the players and the officials ; 
lack of courtesy due other spectators ; a 
"win at all costs" attitude ; lack of under- 
standing of the purpose of school athletics ; 
and a lack of good sportsmanship and good 
citizenship. 

The booer generally discredits only himself, 
although frequently he also brings discredit 
on his own team and school. He sits comfort- 
ably in the stands entirely removed from any 
risk of injury or fatigue. He carries a "know 
it all" attitude. He thinks he knows all the 
game rules, the technique of coaching, the 
play strategy, and what every player or of- 
ficial should do under any and all circum- 
stances. He is a "superman" in his own judg- 
ment, but a dud in everybody else's. He is 
sports' public enemy No. 1. And after the 
game he alibis every defeat and knows exact- 
ly what should have been done. 

Yes, let's join the "ABC"— the "ANTI- 
BOOERS' CLUB" and the "ALWAYS BE 
COURTEOUS" gang. 

— Minnesota Bulletin. 



BASKETBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 
stands with his toes touching the jumping 
circle but with his heels outside it. 

Ruhng: Legal position. The 2-inch wide 
arc, rather than the enclosed area, is the 
circle, hence, jumper is "on his half of the 
circle." When jumper takes this position, 
Official will observe whether his forward 
momentum causes him to contact the oppon- 
ent or to jump through the plane which limits 
jumper's half of the cylinder. He is entitled 
to movement only in his half. 

8. Play: Several years ago a rules revision 
resulted in a separation of the time ball be- 
comes alive on jump ball and time the clock 
is started. What is the reason for such dif- 
ference and has it caused complications? 

Ruling: Most jump ball violations occur 
after ball leaves Official's hand. If ball did 
not become alive at that time, they would be 
dead ball violations and different from other 
floor violations which occur during live ball. 
When the clock was started with the toss, it 
was theoretically Dossible for a team to con- 
sume a few seconds by purposely committing 
a violation. To partially correct this rare 
and somewhat doubtful advantao-e, the time 
for starting the clock was moved un to time 
of a legal tap. This different dividing line 
can result in several irregularities. 

9. Play: Referee is ready to start game 
when he discovers one or more players of 
team A with illeeal numbers. ^Vhat is the 
proper procedure? 

Ruling: A technical foul should be called 
and one free throw, res-ardless of the number 
of players who have illegal numbers, should 
be awarded. Also. Official has authoritv to 
order the team to secure legal numbers. Fail- 
ure to comply with the order could result in 
one or more additional free throws. Whether 
an order of this kind is issued must depend 
on circumstances. In most cases, it is not 
practical to reauire an immediate change 
since it might cau^e undue delav and suit- 
able numbers might not be readily available. 
Official should renort such incident to the 
conference or State Association authorities 
so that future incidents will be avoided. 

10. Play: Does a "common foul" always 
result in the bonus penalty? 

Ruling: It does provided it does not occur 
prior to the team's committing of its fourth 
(or sixth) personal foul durinsr a half. 

IL Play: What signal should Scorer give 
when bonus penalty goes into effect? 

Ruling: Scorer may stand with both arms 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR NOVEMBER, 1957 



outstretched at the side with each index 
finger extended. If desired, red or dark and 
light cards about 12 inches square with H 
printed on one and V on the other may be 
taped to front of Scorers table. When dark 
(V) card is on display, visiting team has 
committed 4 (or 6) personal fouls in the 
half. It should not be displayed until after 
penalty for the 4th personal foul has been 
administered. 

12. Play : What is the penalty for a double 
foul? 

Ruling: Technically, there is no penalty 
since, by definition, a penalty is a free throw. 
It is somewhat similar to football where the 
only result of a double foul is the replaying 
of the down. Penalty for each foul is nulli- 
fied by the other. 

13. Play: During jump ball at A's free 
throw line, the ball is tapped to A4 in his 
court by: (a) jumper Al or non-jumper 
A2; or (b) by non-jumper A3 who taps it 
to the back court during his dribble and af- 
ter he was first to tous'h the jump ball. 

Ruling : In Ca) , it is not a violation unless, 
in the case of non-jumper A2, it is a con- 
trolled slan rather than an attemnt to bat 
the jumn ball to a location where it can be 
controlled. The legal taps of a jumper are 
never considered control. In (b), it is a vio- 
lation 

14. Play: What is the difference between 
"basket interference" and "goal tending"? 

Ruling: Acts in items a and b of Rule 
9-10 are commonly referred to as basket in- 
terference while action in item c is referred 
to as goal tending. There are two differences. 
Basket interference may occur during either 
a trv for field goal or a free throw while 
goal tending annlies onlv to a try for field 
goal. Also, basket interference alwavs oc- 
curs while the ball is in the basket or touch- 
ing the basket cylinder and goal tending can 
occur only when the ball is not touching the 
basket cylinder. 

15. Play: Al tries for field goal from near 
a sideline. Tall A2. near the backboard, times 
his jumn so that, as ball rebounds from one 
side of the backboard, he guides it into the 
basket. 

Ruling: Last year this would have been a 
legal act since rhe restriciion of goal tend- 
ing ended when liall touched either ring or 
backboard. Under current rule, it is illep-al 
p-oal tending unless it is obvious to the Of- 
ficial that the try for field goal ended be- 



cause it struck the backboard at a place such 
that the try was obviously unsuccessful. 
When there is doubt as to whether the bail 
might have entered the basket without as- 
sistance by A2, the Official will rule it illegal. 

16. Play: Free throw by Al is in down- 
ward flight prior to its having touched the 
ring when it is batted by: (a) Bl ; or (b) A2. 
Is this goal tending? 

Ruling: No. In either (a) or (b), it Is a 
free throw violation for having a foot above 
the lane too soon. In (a), it might also be 
basket interference if ball is touching the 
cylinder. In that case, the penalty for the 
first violation is declined and that for the 
second is accepted. 

17. Play : First free throw by A of a bonus 
penalty is batted by Bl while it is in flight 
toward basket. Is this a violation for failure 
of free throw to touch ring? 

Ruling: No. It is a violation by Bl for 
having foot in the lane too soon. The miss- 
ing of the ring is ignored. 

18. Play: Prior to having committed four 
common fouls in a half of a high school game, 
Al and Bl commit a double foul and the foul 
by Al is flagrant. How many throws are 
awarded ? 

Ruling: No free throws are awarded but 
Al is disqualified. This should not be con- 
fused with a somewhat similar situation in 
which a flagrant foul and a non-flagrant foul 
constitute a false double foul. In the latter 
case, the flagrant foul would result in the 
awarding of two free throws and the other 
in one. 

19. Play: Following a double foul, ball is 
being taken to center circle when Al flag- 
rantly pushes Bl. 

Ruling: The third foul makes this a false 
double foul, one element of which is a double 
foul. No free throws for the double foul. 2 
throws for the flagrant technical foul and 
Al is disqualified. Last free throw is follow- 
ed by center jump between any two oppon- 
ents. 

20. Play: Are the free throws canceled if: 
(a) both teams appear with illegal numbers ; 
or (b) Al and Bl slug each other during dead 
ball? 

Ruling: No. Since these are technical fouls, 
they do not constitute a double foul. In (a), 
one free throw and in (b), two free throws 
are awarded each team. In either case, center 
jump follows the last free throw. 



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grey poplin $15.20 

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Contrasting color sleeves at 75c. Girls sizes available in all 
above models at no extra charge. Other cloths in regular 
jackets and reversible jackets also available. Please write for 
quotations. Any style knit trim available above. 

AWARD SWEATERS 

No. HIV — In medium weight 100% worsted and wool V neck pullover $10.95 

No. 26V — A 100% worsted and wool medium weight V neck pullover $11.95 

No. H4V — A 100% worsted wool medium weight V neck pullover $ 7.95 

No. HIJ — A 100% medium heavy worsted coat style button front $12.95 

No. 26J — Medium weight worsted and wool coat style button front sweater $14.25 

All standard athletic colors and all sizes for boys and girls available from stock in above sweaters. 
Please write for quotations on chenille letters and emblems for all above jackets and sweaters. 





Hunt's Athletic Goods Co. 

Phone 104 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

THE LARGEST EXCLUSIVE ATHLETIC HOUSE IN TI-IE SOUTH 




THE 



Basketball 
SCORE MASTER scoreboards 



MIN.|i:t#SEC. 



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Units: 6l/2"x 10" 

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When ordering give distance from board to power plug. 8-foot power plug cable attached to board. 

Extra power cable 16c per foot. 

When ordering give distance from board to operator's table. Control cable extra 36c per foot. 

Control box has 10 feet of cable attached. If additional cable is needed specify how much. 



VISITORS 



HOME 





(Left to Right) Front Row: Coach Meihaus, O'Connell, Garau, Spann Beaiden Mile<! To 
Capt Rice, Co-Capt Schoen, Burmester, Rappa, Reeves, Stutzenberge- AssTcofchLoD" 
Second Row: Ass't. Coach Passafiume, Mudd, Ridge, Cassell, Guaniasfhelli O'Rourke Giun' 
«sen, Kraus, Raque, Holmes, Dodg-e, Steele, MeCormick. Third Row Sn Pari^tt' Claie 
Weiseman, Camferon, Duggins, Larkin, Pennev, Finney, Bickel Moseley S' DunLtan Mor' 
Hagan Fourh Row: Mgr. McLaughlin, Weis, Simmon Carney, Weihe Thoi^^^^ 
kamp, Schweitzer, Wiegel, Barrow, Kremer, Downard, Aspatore, Mgr ' Ludw g F f h Row- 
£• G: fntoZi; "' '^''"^'"' ^"''"' ^""''"' ^'"^■-'''' H«bbs.^Gossman,'smifh, MuS; 

St. Xavier 61— Hall St. Xavier 0— Male 

i ^r?^*" Jl~^''^- ?".l™^ ° St- Xavier S^Atherton fi 

St. Xavier 23-di.Pont Manual 13 St. Xavier 14-Trinity 

St. Xavier 9— Roger Bacon St. Xavier 14— Flaget 13 

St. Xavier 47 — Corbin 






'UCIQi kJZ^Kl' 



DECEMBER 



UC AS 



E. MAIN ST. (LYNCH)— CUMBERLAND VALLEY CONFERENCE CO-CHAMPION 




(Left to Rightl Front Row: Mgr. Wilder, Jenkins, Burns, W. Rice, Pierce, S. Rue, Hi\ ue», I'utttji, Mgi. 
_rle. Second Row: Coach Riley, Mann, Oakley, Burnette, Blondell, Molley, Hagy, McGeorge, Owens, Beckler, 
Evans, Ass't. Coach Collins, Ass't. Coach Miracle. Third Row: Bundy, Burnette, Hoiska, Hollin, Van Hoosier, 
Brewer, .Tackson, Disney, Kincer. 

CATLETTSBURG— NORTHEASTERN KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




'- '' uj i "- y 



(Left to Right) Front Row: Nunley, Braham, Johnson, Strait, Lee, May, Deskins. Benard, J. Rice. Second 
Row: Elliott, Butler, Crank, Howell, Scott, B. J. Stewart, Lewis, Willis, Robinson, Moore. Third Row: Smith, J. 
Stewart, Brewer, Pope, Donavan, Hunley, Ferguson, P. Rice, Vonderheide, Bates, Shivel, Workman, Remmele. 

JENKINS— EASTERN KENTUCKY MOUNTAIN CONFERENCE CHAMPION 







The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XX— NO. 5 



DECEMBER, 1957 



1.00 Per Year 



Early Season Basketball Questions — Installment 2 



Editor's Note: These rulings do not set aside or modify 
rule. They are interpretations on some of the early sei 
situations which have been presented. 

22. Play: During .jump ball, jumper Al 
jumps through the plane which divides the 
jumping cylinder. Is this a violation? 

Ruling: The rules do not list this as a 
violation. If contact occurs, the jumper who 
is encroaching is responsible. 

Comment: If the act were listed as a vio- 
lation, the succeeding contact would then be 
during dead ball and would not be a foul. 
Since it is not a violation, the contact is dur- 
ing live ball and is a personal foul. 

23. Play: Should Officials adopt the philos- 
ophy of "no harm, no foul" ? 

Ruling: In the opinion of the high school 
group and many others, an attempt by an 
Official to determine whether any possible 
harm has been done each time contact oc- 
curs, would result in varying degrees of chaos 
and make the Official's task even more dif- 
ficult than under the current policy of at- 
tempting to follow the rules. The rules do 
not instruct the Official to call a foul each 
time there is contact. In many cases, two 
players are in an equally favorable position 
to secure control of the ball or to perform 
normal movements. This is especially true in 
congested areas near the basket when many 
players are occupying a comparatively small 
area. There is certain to be some incidental 
contact which is not an infraction of any rule. 
Officials are trained well enough to deter- 
mine when players are in equally favorable 
positions to make normal movements in of- 
fense or defense. 

24. Play: Does Case Book Play 130 repre- 
sent a change from past procedure? 

Ruling : No. The play is new but procedure 
is the same as has been authorized by the 
rules for several years. When there is a 
question about the relation of expiration of 
time to some act on the court, final decision 
is made by the Referee or by other Official 
if authority has been delegated to him. If 
Scorers agree, it is customary for the Ref- 
eree to accept this agreement but if there 
should be irregularities which lead the Ref- 



eree to believe that an injustice is being done, 
he has authority to rule according to the 
best available information. 

25. Play : Are the free throws canceled if : 
(a) both teams appear with illegal numbers; 
or (b) Al and Bl slug each other during dead 
ball ? 

Ruhng: No. Technical fouls do not make a 
double foul. Each team is awarded one free 
throw in (a) and two in (b). Center jump 
follows the last throw. 

26. Play: Are the free throw lane alley 
marks part of the free throw lane and is it a 
violation to step on or over one of these too 
soon? 

Ruling: Last sentence of Rule 1-5 is not 
intended to include alley marks and it is not 
a violation to step on one of them. Stepping 
on the first mark might be a violation for 
leaving the first alley too soon. The first 
alley ends at that edge of the alley mark 
nearest the end line. A player is not entirely 
in the first alley if he has a foot on the mark. 
For the other alleys, there is no restriction 
on when a player may leave and stepping on 
an alley mark is not an infraction. If there 
is argument because a player has the habit 
of encroaching by putting his foot on an 
alley mark, Official should instruct any 
player in the second alley that he is entitled 
to step on the mark which is nearest the 
end line but that his other foot must be in- 
side the mark between the 2nd and 3rd 
spaces (See court diagram). Official should 
not "look for trouble" and should act only if 
there is abuse of intended rights. 

27. Play: What guides should be used by 
the Referee in determining when teams 
should be warned about an actionless con- 
test? 

Ruling: The National Committee did not 
regard the problem serious enough to war- 
rant enacting any rule which would make it 
possible for one team to compel the opponent 
to use a pressing type of defense or to pre- 
vent the offense from using a deliberate type 
of play designed to draw the opponent out of 
(Continued on Page Four) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1957 



DECEMBER, 1957 



VOL. XX— NO. 5 



Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFOBD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1956-60), Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1957-61), Marion 

Directors — W. B. Jones (1957-61) Somerset; W. H. Crowdus 
(1954-58), Franklin; Jack Dawson (1954-58), Louisville; 
Robert P. Forsythe (1955-59), Greenville; K. G. Gillaspie 
(1955-59), Georgetown; Cecil A. Thornton (1966-60), Harlan. 
Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



jErom the Commlssione'i s CJffi 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1957 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



State Tournament Information 

The 1958 State High School Basketball Tourna- 
ment will be held in the University of Kentucky 
Coliseum, Lexington, on March 19-22. The first 
session is scheduled for Wednesday night. Three 
sessions will be held on Thursday, two on Friday 
and two on Saturday. 

At some time in the month of December the 
Commissioner will send K.H.S.A.A. member schools 
forms which may be used in requesting passes to 
to the tournament. These forms may be returned 
on and after January 2. 

Complete sets of tickets are priced at $8.00 
(end seats, balcony), $12.00 (chair back seats and 
bleacher seats below the ramps), and $20.00 (box 
seats.) The general sale of tickets (not school or- 
ders) will be conducted by the State Tournament 
Ticket Sales, P. O. Box 117.3, Lexington. These or- 
ders should not be placed before January 15. The 
amount of 25c should be added to each remittance 
(not school orders) to pay for postage and insur- 
ance charges. Orders mailed prior to January 15 
will receive a lower priority than those mailed on 
that date. 

Delegate Assembly Members 

Members to the Delegate Assembly at the forth- 
coming 1958 annual meeting of the Association were 
elected by the principals of K.H.S.A.A. member 
schools on ballots returned to the State Office 
before November 15. There were several ties in the 
voting for delegate and alternate. These ties were 
broken recently by the Board of Control, the dele- 
gates or alternates involved being determined by 
lot. The names of the district representatives are 
as follows': 

Delegates 

(1) J. M. Martin, (2) John Robinson, (3) McCoy 
Tarry, (4) Joe P. Duke, (5) Charles Quisenberry, 
(6) Charles Jenkins, (7) Edward P. Hickev, Jr., 
(8) Waldo Wolfe, (9) Jimmy Holland, (10) Thomas 
Brantley, ((1) K. Forbis Jordan, (12) George Clai- 
borne, (13) Jack Williamson, (14) Bowman Daven- 
port, (15) Charles S. Combs, (16) Charles Fades, 
(17) Jim Ownby, (18) Harold Hunter, (19) George 



Sadler, (20) Ralph Reece, (21) Gene Tate, (22) 
Cortland Cox, (23) Damon Ray, (24) Gamis Martin, 
(25) A. J. Ries, (26) J. C. Cantrell, (29) Tom Jef- 
fries, (30) Elmo Head, (31) Robert B. Hehl, (32) 
Palmore Lyles, (33) James Smith, (34) Edgar Mc- 
Nabb, (35) Don Davis, (36) Tom Gabbard, (37) 
Tony Raiser, (38) Patrick E. Napier, (39) William 
Ryan, (40) J. C. Falkenstine, (41) Lapsley Card- 
well, (42) Henry Pryse, (43) John Heber, (44) Wil- 
liam W. Davis, (45) Leon Kingsolver, (46) D. J. 
Ramsey, (47) Norman Antle, (48) R. S. Baldwin, 

(49) Charles Norris, (50) Charles Singleton, (51) 
James A. Pursifull, (52) Joe Campbell, (53) Ernie 
Trosper, (54) Goebel Ritter, (55) Joe Caudill, (56) 
Blaine Martin, (57) John Bill Trivette, (58) Denzil 
Halbert, (59) James Chandler, (60) Willis H. Con- 
ley, (61) Sister Caroline Mary, (62) Warren Cooper, 
(63) Hayden Parker, (64) Webb Young. 

Alternates 
(1) James H. Phillips, (2) Richard L. Winebarger, 
(3) Cecil Reid, (4) Guy Lovins, (5) Fred Clayton, 
(6) George Perry, (7) I. Fred Porter, (8) 0. P. 
Hurt, (9) Jim Lynch, (10) Russell Below, (11) 
David Boyken, 12) Lawrence McGinnis, (13) Willis 
Simpson, (14) John Taylor, (15) William T. Leach, 
(16) Delmas Gish, (17) Elvis Donaldson, (18) B. H. 
Weaver, (19) L. J. Twyman, (20) Lindle Castle, 
(21) Billy B. Smith, (22) Little C. Hale, (23) Paul 
E. Kerrick, (24) John Stoll, (25) John Turner, (26) 
W. K. Niman, (29) W. G. Wells, (30) Randal Pel- 
frev, (31) J. M. Bailey, (32) John M. Potter, (33) 
James O'Connell, (34) Heulyn Bishop, (35) Kenneth 
Kuhnert, (36) Lawrence Kinney, (37) Kelley Stan- 
field, (38) Herman 0. Hale, (39) Fred Cliumbler 
(40) Fred Creasey,, (41) Ray Butler, (42) Amos 
Black, (43) R. L. Grider, (44) Zeb Blankenship, (45) 
Don Rawlings, (46) Dovle McGuffey, (47) J. B. Al- 
bright, (48) Harold Storm, (49) J. W. Thurman, 

(50) Harry Taylor, (51) Orville Engle, (52) Jerry 
Johns, (53) Jack Burkich, (54) James Buckner, (55) 
Morton Combs, (56) W. O. Gabbard, (57) Glenn 
McDowell, (58) Estil Hall, (59) Johnny Marcum, 
(60) Gene Cain, (61) Alex Stevens, (62) John 
"Sonny" Allen, (63) Glenn Sparks, (64) H. R. 
Bowling. 

SUPPLEMENTARY LIST 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled November 22) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Akin, George H., 197-E Prichard Place, Ft. Knox, WI 2-2455, 

6949 
Armstrong, Fred W., Box 284, La Center, No 5-8991, No. 5-8081 
Ballard, .Jack H., 128 Pine St.. Barbourville. 453, 472 
Barlow. Billy B.. Route 5. Paris, 1095W, 2-2220. Ext. 2263 
Bishop, Thomas Dewane, U. of K. Box 1519, Lexington 
Black. Charles D., 138 Pine, Barbourville, 193, 341 
Bliss, Lt. Charles Fred, 70F Wherry, Ft. Campbell, GE 9-3821, 

3279 
Brantley, Alfred C, P. O. Box 253, 862 S. Main, Madisonville, 

TA 1-6521, TA 1-6521 
Burkley, George A., 4104 Stoneview Dr., Louisville, Tw 6-0433, 

ME 7-1445 
Butler. Cortez. Edmonton, GE 2-2143. GE 2-3331 
Campbell, John Jr.. Garrett. 5521, 3461 
Carlisle, John R.. Route 2, La Center 
Conley, Orville D., Morehead State College, Morehead 
Cowley, Hays L. Jr., 129 Hamilton Pk., Lexington, 2-8334 

(Bus. No.) 
Dalton, Ray H., 4707 Dohn Rd., Louisville 16, EM 6-8065 
Davenport, Billy Von, P. O. Box 201, R.F.D. 2, Williamsburg, 

6432 
Davenport, Robert B., Shakertown Rd., Burgin, 5204, 5180 
Davis, Harold Thompson, Beaver Dam, 4665 
DeMoisey, Truett R., P. O. Box 7, Walton, 1423, 1423 
Diachenko, Nick C, P. O. Box 290, Jenkins 
Downing, D. G., Smallhouse Rd., Bowling Green, 2-6368, 3-4334, 

Ext. 9 
Durham, Farris Montie, 137 Estill, Richmond, 1978 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1957 



Page Three 



HIGHLANDS— NORTHERN KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




£ 



±1. 



/«r%nc 



»*% 



^^T 



^^ r '^^'^ ^^"^F-^i 












• 



"nn.,!! 



(Left to Right) Front Row: Emmons, Bentley, Moseley, Crawford, John Burt, Cochran, Straub, Jim Burt, 
Stoneburner, Beineke. UUman. Second Row : Kibler, Kellen, First, Sorensen, Haas. Hodges, Kemplin, Ander- 
son, Lee, Goes, McPhail, Borches. Third Row : Coach Engelhard, Smoot, Finneseth, Waddell, Hollohan, Herfel, 
Wohlgemuth. Coomer, Barrett, Waite, Coach Sadosky. Fourth Row : Mgr. Law, Mgr. Shearer, Rice. Hudepohl, 
Martin, McAtee, Brandhorst, Kelly, Flaig, Mgr. McGraw. Mgr. Montfort. Fifth Row: Coach Hauck. Coach Rice, 
Coach Hauselman. 



Durkin, Jack H., 240 Hillsboro, Lexington. 4-4396, 4-1717 
Eddings, Forrest, 418 Kinkead, Paducah, 2-8697, 2-1621 
Elder, Donald G., Apt. 66, Morehead State College, Mor 



ehead. 



757 JX 



Union College, Barbourville, 35, 
Henry, 317 S. 5th St., Mayfield 
Box 101 Middlesboro, Cumberland 



391 



Gap 2111, 



Jimmy 
Emerson, Williai 
Farmer, John H 

Fitchko, Bill, 918 Park Ave., Norton, Va., 466-W o 

Foster, J. W., 821 Carneal Rd., Le.xington, 4-8058, 

Francis. George, Sassafras 

Freeman. Thomas Edward, F130 Cooperstown, Le! 

Gutzwiller, Robert, 1504 Norway Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 

Hall, Monroe, Jr., Belfry, Stone 2212 

Harbin, Lorenzo W., Jr., 240 Hopkinsville 

1087-W 
Hardin, Jack, 1105 "B" St., Ceredo, W. Va. 
Harmon, Charles W., Williamsburg, 6709 
Harrod, Tedford E., 166C Prichard PI., Ft. 

5757 (Special Service) 
Hatfield, Cecil, P. O. Box 844, Berea College, Berea 
Hellmann, Ronald Frank, 314 East 17th, Covington. AX 1-2216 
Hensley, Robert B., P. O. Box 214, Horse Cave, St. 6-7163 
Hightower, Kenneth T., P. O. Box 88, Western Ky. State 

College, Bowling Green, VI 2-2523 
Hinkle, Melvin B., 1442 Cypress St., Paris, 1152 J 
Hoggard, Robert L., 1349 College St., Bowling Green, VI 2-1579 
Hogge, Gary A., P. O. Box 426. Olive Hill, FA 6-53(11 
Hurst, David E., Box 453, Middlesboro, 707, 263 
James, Edward, Route 4, Mayfield 
Johnson, James B.. 117 St. Phillips Dr., Lexington, 5-3561, 

2-2250 
Johnson, John Luther, Shelby Gap 

Knapp, Robert, 422 Third Ave., Dayton, AX 1-4325, WO 1-7575 
Knight, Douglas, Route 1, Stanley, Va. 

- " Special Services, Ft. Knox, 2514 

Jr., 6 Tanner Dr., Frankfort. 7-4116, 38030 
''., Oil Springs 
298 American Ave., Lexington, 5-2153, 4-3077 
2310 Vinton Ave., Portsmouth, Ohio, 



ngton 



Greenville 



WI 22568, 



Miller, Bob, 530 Berry Ave., Bellevue, Co. 1-5655. Co. 1-2980 

Miller, Claude, 704V> 10th Ave., Huntington, W. Va. 

Moll, Charles Joseph, 1002 Ashland, Louisville 

Monahan, Edward J., 6821 Tarawa Dr., Cincinnati 24, Ohio, 

Jackson 1-6582, Mulberry 1-8300 
Monroe, Robert W., 501 W. Poplar, Elizabethtown, RO 6-4900, 

RO 5-6151 
Morse, C. L., NCO Quarters, 3037-H, Ft. Campbell, 4563, 

3320 or 3405 
Mulligan, J. T., 427 Center, Erlanger, DI 1-5628 (Bus. No.) 
Murphy, Roy Fred, P. O. Box 519, Morehead 
Newman, Bill, 2535 Ritchie, Portsmouth. Ohio, Elmwood 3-6257 
Nickell, Carl Duane, 2009 Broad St., Paducah, 5-6095 
Nord, Ed, 1734 S. 23rd, Louisville, Sp 4-1958, Tw 5-3401, 

Ext. 202 
Norvell, G. H., Jr., 464 Carlisle, Lexington, 3-3075, 2-2626 
Odle, Thurman, 310 E. 14th. Bowling Green, VI 3-6574 
O'Leary, Charlie, 3462 Whitfield Ave., Cincinnati 20, Ohio, 

PL 1-5455, FA 1-7340 
Patterson, C. Clement, Jr., Ing 
Payne, James W., 44 Boone, Be 
Pierce, Ray, 917 Oak Hill Rd. 

Ha 4-7741, Ext. 264 

Donald Boyd, R, 



im Ave., Flemingsburg, 3711 
ea, 1062 
Evansvillt, Ind., Ha 3-0454, 



Willie 
Leathers, O. 
Litteral, Harr 
McBride, Don, 
McCormick. 



EL 4-1157, jiL 3-2187 
McGehee, Gordon K., 117 E. 30th, Covington, CO 1-6880 
McGuire, Claude L., P. O. Box 537, Morehead 
McGuire. Herbert W.. 509 St. Joseph Lane, Apt. C, Park Hill, 

Covington. AX 1-7715, AT 3-3361 
McQuilling, Gerald A., 3011 S. Lombard, Evansville, Ind.. 

GR 6-6941, HA 5-3311 
Massey Douglas L., College Station, P. O. Box 1232, Berea, 

9128, 301 
Mays, Ralph J., Barbourville, 710R 
Mericle, Russell A. Jr., B Co., 187th INF., Ft. Campbell, 2274, 

3078 
Miles, Francis, 1142 S. 36th St., Louisville, SP 6-2331 



Poyner, Donald Boyd, R. F. D. 1, Mayfield, Ev 2-2155 
Pruden, Jim, 118 W. 22nd St., Owensboro, Mu 4-4469, Mu 3-4555 
Qualey, L. V. Box 26, NAVY No. 824 c/o Fleet Post Office, 

San Francisco, Cal. 
Raisor, J. T., 990 Fredericksburg Rd., Lexington, 4-0304 (Bus. 

No.) 
Randolph, John Walter, R. F. D. 1, Murray, 1561 R 
Rose, Lee Hyden, 209 East MaxwtU St.. Lexington, 2-4568 
Rose, Wallace C, 623 Southridge, Lexington, 2-7255 
Rusk. William "Bill" Duncan, Centre College, Danville 
Sanders, Glenn, P. O. Box 92, Liberty, 3521, 4591, 4541 
Shumate, Fred R., 122 Glover, Portsmouth, Ohio, El 3-5466 
Simons, Joe A.. R. F. D. 2, Flemingsburg, 4681 
Simms, Sylvester, 510 N. Donivan. Princeton, 6678 
Slack, Earl H., 4630 Hillside Dr., Louisville, EM 6-8793, 

EM 6-8793 
Steely, Stanley E., South 11th. Williamsburg, 3641. 6156 
Stephenson, Thomas Haywood, 1234 Jefferson, Paducah, 5-7764, 

2-4634 



Charle 



180; 



., Maple S 
St. 6-7131 
18th., Bowling Gr 



O. Box 335, Horse Ca 
VI 3-9867 



Tavlor, Ed, 435 No. 41st., Louii 

Taylor, Dennis H., 1406 Hughes, 

Tichenor, -Timmy, Centertown 

Tolle, Charles W., 108 Third St., Cynthiana 786-R, 1524 

Tolle, Lewis D.. 225 Church St., Cynthiana, 1436, 235 

Trivette, John Bill, Pikeville. 265, 912 

Ulsas, Charles F., 513 Rosewood Dr., Evansville, Ind., Ha 

3-4324, GR 6-6521 
Wagers, Lyde, 402^i Exeter Ave., Middlesboro, 1414-J 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1957 



ELIZABETHTOWN— MID-KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




S 







«iSh,iiP*iM»u«| 



(Left to Right I lo, Mill , \ in n >! 

Perry, McCuliom. be...n.l K..« r. .l^, M.,l,ln, U 
Hawkins. Bale, HamiUun, loiil. Allen. Uiumfiekl 
Randsdell, Fold, .lohnson. Best, Allen, Beck, Christoph. 




< Tikins, S"wartz, Gray, Garrett, Davis, 
LV Koziel], Bernard, Monroe, Akers, 
Lawson, Nottingham, Shipp, Coyle, 



Waide, Harry, 510 Church St., Providence, MO 7-2421, MO 

7-2055 
Walton, Roy, 946 Mason Headley Rd., Lexington, 4-8189 
Ware, Richard M.. 1689 Martha Ave., Barboursville, W. Va. 
Waters, Allen Darnell, Springfield, 4282, 3911 
Weddington, Herbert, 166 Sunset Dr., Frankfort, 7-6704, 3-1616 
Wesche, James A., 427 Queensway Dr., Lexington 4-4413 
Wood, Donald Kay, 1300 Olive, Murray, 676 W 
Woods, Clyde M.. Box 47. Four Mile. Ed 7-3458 
Woten, Lawrence, 115 Offenere St., Portsmouth, Ohio, El 3-2376 
Wright, Paul, Broadway, Hazard, Oak 428, 502 
Yates, Berthel, R. F. D. 3, Fulton 
Zalla, .Tohn W., 1622 Woodburn Ave.. Covington, He 1-5897 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
MEMBER SCHOOLS OF THE K.H.S.A.A. 



Auxier 
Buigin 
Carlisle County 

(Bardwell) 
Dilce Combs Memorial 

(Jeff) 
Good Shepherd 

(Frankfort) 
Lincoln 

(Stanford) 



Lone Oak 

(Paducah) 
Owensboro Technical 
Riverside Christian Trng. 

(Lost Creek) 
Rosenwald 

( Barbour ville) 
St. Mary's Academy 

( Paducah ) 



BASKETBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page One) 
position before attempting a try-for-goal. 
The new rule operates only if and when a 
game develops into a "sitdown" type of con- 
test. If it does develop into such a contest, it 
will be fairly early in .the game. If, near the 
end of a period, the offensive team should 
choose to "stall" to protect a lead or to have 
the last try for goal, it is assumed that there 
has already been sufficient action to take the 
game out of the classification of a "sitdown" 



contest. If the action during the earlier part 
of a period provides something interesting 
for the spectators to watch, there is no rea- 
son for the Referee to warn the teams. If 
the ball is merely being passed from Al to 
A2 and back again, it is doubtful whether 
this is of sufficient interest, especially if such 
action is within the 15-feet "non-scoring" 
belt. But if the offensive team passes and 
dribbles so that the ball is taken into scoring 
area where the defense has an opportunity 
to force action, the Referee will seldom con- 
sider it an actionless contest and he will not 
warn the teams. But, after having once 
warned the teams that the "actionless con- 
test" rule is now in effect, he will no longer 
pay any attention to whether the ball is on 
or in advance of the 15-foot belt. This belt 
is merely a guide as to whether the Official 
thinks there is sufficient provocation to stop 
the game and warn the teams. This rule will 
operate in very few games. It is to be used 
as a last resort to insure the spectators hav- 
ing something interesting to watch and play- 
ers getting some exercise and enioyment in 
demonstrating skills. 

28. Play: Al becomes confused and 
"dunks" the ball in B's basket. Is this legal? 

Ruling: No. It is a violation since "dunk- 
ing" is permissible only at a team's own 
basket. However, the net point result is the 

(Continued on Page Seven) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1957 



Page Five 



HISEVILLE— BARREN RIVER SIX-MAN CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Front Row: White, R. Jackson, Long, Cox, H. Jackson, Hughes, Strader, Chiist\ s. , m il Ko 
Coach Sadler. Third Row: Edwards, Byrd, Brown, Parrish. Spillman, P. Peterson, Williams T Ptteis 
Thompson. 

HARLAN— SOUTHEASTERN KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CO-CHAMPION 




(Left to Right) Fri 
PoUitte. Howard, Mille 
Seales, Ledford, Pars 



low: Mgr. Hatmaker, Mgr. Hoskins, Bob Asher. Anderson, Roaik, Reeves, Bud Asher, 
reer, Mgr. Halcomb. Mgr. Napier. Second Row: Asi't Coach Waid, Mgi. Shoit, 
rd, Marlin, Gross. Chitwood, Sca'f. Haynes, Laws, Wall, Coach Gilly. Ass't. Coach 



Third Row: Wilson, Myers. Kirk, Thompso 



Blanton. Tweed. 



SHELBYVILLE— CENTRAL KENTUCKY CONFERENCE CHAMPION 



4 i-^f 




*-1 







f 



(Left to Right) Front Row: Greenwell, Head, Demaree, Andriot, Hinton, .lackson. Kays, J. Swigert, B. 
Green, Frazier. Fallis, Landers, Moore, Jones. Second Row : M. McGinnis, Cheek, Crawford, Settle, Herman 
Brown, C. Blown, Cowherd, Ellis, J. Brown, Long, Marshall, Gi.es, Walters, M. Green. Third Row: Ass't Coach 
Buckner, Cottongim, D. Swigert, Arnold, Connell, D. Ethington, Hugh Brown, Frye, C. Ethington, Johnson, 
Florence, T, . McGinnis, Blakemore, Yount, Webb, Head Coach Greenwell. 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1957 



The Flying Dutchman 

Clip the following to your Basketball Rules 
books, officials. We are "snowed under" with 
requests for the following rulings: 

PLAY : Ball is touching the cylinder above 
A's basket, but at least three-fourths of it 
is outside the cylinder. In this position, ball 
is touched by A-1 or B-1 and the hand does 
not touch the basket or the cylinder. Is this 
a violation? 

RULING. Yes. 

PLAY: While ball is: (a) on the ring or 
part way through the net; or (b) is bouncing 
in the cylinder above the ring, the net is 
slapped by A-1 or B-1. 

RULING: In (a), it is a violation. In (b) 
it is not a violation. 

A rule which this year is important to 
sporting goods houses as well as coaches 
and officials follows: 

Each player shall be numbered on the front 
and back with plain numbers of solid color 
contrasting with the color of his shirt and 
made of material not less than 3/4" wide. 

Comment: Some coaches have ordered 
white shirts with a white number which has 
a different color border to make it stand out. 
This is illegal. The intent of this rule is to do 
away with outlined numbers. If a team vio- 
lates this rule, it must pay for the violation 
with one technical foul in each game played. 

Carlisle is hailing an excellent job of foot- 
ball coaching done by energetic Bill Ed Leedy. 
This young man has racked up an enviable 
record, winning six consecutive games and 
losing only his final one. All this in the face 
of the handicap of having only nineteen boys 
on his roster. 

Bill Ed laughs at handicaps. With only 
nineteen boys reporting, his fullback, George 
Gaffin, suffered a broken leg on the very 
first day of practice. So, with a squad of only 
eighteen, Coach Bill Ed Leedy took a team 
that had a 2-4-1 record to a 6-1 mark in the 
short space of a year. A modest fellow, be- 
ing considered for "Coach of the Year," he 
passes on a "bushel basket" of praise to his 
assistant coach, Gayle Bowen. 

When we think of outstanding football 
coaches, we remember Shelbyville's one and 
only "Puss" Greenwell. "Puss" has consist- 
ently done a tremendous job, not only build- 
ing teams, but fine men as well, but this 
year, he turned in his masterpiece. Labe 
Jackson says Shelbyville's team was a joy to 
behold, and Labe knows football. 




BILL ED LEEDY 

Here comes a bit of humor, although it is 
questionable whether Jim Bazzell, of Allen 
County High, will find much to laugh about 
in this case. Jim was demonstrating to his 
Allen County basketeers the proper way to 
pivot, when he came up with a broken foot. 
Imagine his reaction as he told his boys, 
"This is the way to do it." "Casey" Read, of 
Scottsville, feels there could be a rash of 
broken feet appear in Allen County if the 
boys learned their lesson that afternoon. 

From Elizabethtown comes the word that 
Kean Jenkins, one of the finest athletes ever 
developed there, has taken over the director- 
ship of the Elizabethtown Recreation Pro- 
gram. Kean has everything necessary to 
project Elizabethtown into a position of 
prominence in the field of recreation. A pro- 
duct of the immortal Doug Smith, he is one 
of Kentucky's Noblemen. 

With officials' associations rapidly in- 
creasing over Kentucky, it follows that 
basketball officiating in general is improv- 
ing. Irby Hummer of Hodgenville, Bill Hogg 
of Elizabethtown, Charles Aiken of White 
Mills, Booker McClaskey of Lebanon Junc- 
tion, and Adrian Back of Hodgenville point 
with pride to the South Central Officials' 
Association. 

Howard Gardner, sixth regional represen- 
tative of the K.H.S.A.A., serves this group 
as general rules interpreter. Howard says 
that their purpose is to promote a well train- 
ed body of officials, to foster enthusiasm, 
initiative, and a spirit of fellowship among 
(Continued on Page Eleven) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1957 



Page Seven 



BASKETBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Page Four) 
same since 2 points are awarded the oppon- 
ent for the violation. 

29. Play: While ball is: (a) on the ring 
or part way through the net; or (b) is bounc- 
ing in the cylinder above the ring, the net is 
slapped by Al or Bl. 

Ruling: In (a), it is a violation unless it is 
during a legal dunking motion. In (b), it is 
not a violation. 

Comment : Extereme situations could make 
(a) appear to be too restrictive. Possibility 
of many borderline cases makes it undesir- 
able to leave this to Official's judgment. The 
lesser of several evils is to make no excep- 
tions. Players should regard any touching 
of the basket as being "poison." 

30. Play: Ball is touching cylinder above 
A's basket but at least three-fourths of it is 
outside the cylinder. In this position, ball is 
touched by Al or Bl and the hand does not 
touch the basket or the cylinder. Is this a 
violation ? 

Ruling: Yes. Under last year's rule, the 
prohibition was against a hand being in the 
cylinder but the revised rule is more restric- 
tive since it applies whenever any part of the 
ball is touching the cylinder. 

31. Play: Bl: (a) intentionally but not fla- 
grantly pushes Al while he is trying for field 
goal ; or (b) flagrantly pushes or strikes non- 
thrower A2 or an Official. Is an additional 
free throw awarded for the intentional or 
flagrant phase of the foul? 

Ruling: In (a), the extra fi'ee throw is 
awarded if the try is successful but not when 
it is unsuccessful. If the try is unsuccessful 
there is a second free throw but not because 
of the intentional phase of the foul. In (b), 
the additional throw is awarded because of 
the flagrant nature of the foul and Bl is dis- 
qualified. 

32. Play: With team A in the lead and 
about 10 seconds remaining in the game, 
there is a throw-in by Al. Al consumes 3 or 
4 seconds with the throw-in and passes to 
A2 in his back court. A2 is surrounded by 
teammates so that time expires before Bl 
can reach the ball. 

Ruling: The rules do not prevent the con- 
suming of time in this manner in the back 
court. It is similar to the situation in which 
Al might dribble in the back court for less 
than 10 seconds and then request time-out. 
If time-out is granted, Al might consume 
another 8 or 9 seconds by dribbling in the 
back court. 



Comment: It might be possible to adopt 
a rule to make it more difficult to consume 
time. But it is doubtful whether any rule 
could remove all opportunity for a team to 
run out the clock when they are in control 
with a few seconds remaining. Many believe 
that the team which is ahead in such a situa- 
tion deserves to win. 

Experimentation: The following projects 
have been recommended by the National 
Committee as offering possibilities for con- 
structive experimentation. 

1. To further reduce number of free 
throws, prescribe that a common foul com- 
mitted by a team during a half prior to their 
having committed four (or six) personal 
fouls, will result in the offended team taking 
ball out of bounds as a free throw. Related 
facts: The idea of reducing free throws 
originated in a suggestion that possession out 
of bounds, rather than a free throw, be the 
penalty for a certain number of fouls. At 
first this was considered too drastic because 
a free throw still had point value. Changes in 
width of the free throw lane and in place- 
ment along the lane have reduced the point 
value of a free throw. Increased skills in 
field goal throwing have increased the value 
of possession. These changes have reduced 
the point value of a free throw to zero. The 
result of awarding ball out of bounds as a 
substitute for one free throw would make no 
change in point value. If it is desirable to 
further reduce number of free throws, such 
rule would do it without disturbing scoring 
balance. 

2. Mark a semi-circle with a 6-feet radius 
centered under the basket. Apply the 3- 
second lane restriction only in such circle. 

3. For a throw-in at the end of the court, 
after a successful goal, use the same restric- 
tions as for any other throw-in. 

4. Stop the clock each time ball becomes 
dead and shorten each period to make the 
game about the same over-all length as at 
present. 

5. Continue experimentation with a rule 
which would allow a team a maximum of 
about 15 seconds of continuous control in 
the front court. 

There is a reason — or is there? 

1. Since, for all jump balls, ball is now 
taken to a circle, why shouldn't the rules per- 
mit center or any player to jump on any 
jump ball? 

2. Why shouldn't basket interference be 

(Continued on Page Twelve) 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1957 



BENHAM— CUMBERLAND VALLEY CONFERENCE CO-CHAMPION 





'3 



^4^^^^^"' "''^^^!rfo2!4 







^ 



(Left to Kightl Fiont RoH link K.i-,iiuk f.nvl.ush (.illi.ini. Flan, 
Simpson, Hensley. Second Row Coach DaM',, Nunnery. -Tames. B. DaMs. 1 
Hodges. Mgr. Prewitt Thud Row. Mgr White. Mgr. Helton HiII, Giadso 
Hughes. Funk. Coach Shumate, Coach Roark. Fouith Row Rav Simpson 
Amason, W. Hodges, Whetsel. Lewis, .T. O'Dell. 



Huid L D.m, liuili.ni.in lioniui 

rrent, Coinett. H O'Dell, Cloie. D 

on, Messer, Orick. Swisher, Mowery, 

Daugherty, G Simpson, Knoll, 



The 1957 Cross Country 

The Trinity High School of Louisville won 
the fifth official K.H.S.A.A. Cross Country 
Run, which was held in Lexington on Novem- 
ber 16. The team score was 66. First place 
was won by Charles Wine of Trinity, with a 
time of 11:23. The Trinity team was coach- 
ed by Jerry Denny. 

The Fern Creek High School team won 
second place with a score of 96. The team 
was coached by John Pittenger. 

The Run was held on the Picadome Golf 
Course, and was managed by the Spiked Shoe 
Society of the University of Kentucky. Dr. 
Don Cash Seaton and Robert Johnson, track 
coaches at the University, are the sponsors 
of the Society. The course was laid off for a 
distance of approximately two miles. 

Five regional runs had been held on Nov- 
ember 2 for the purpose of qualifying teams 
and individuals for the state event, with the 
following teams advancing to the state : 
Paducah Regional — Paducah Tilghman; 
Bowling Green Regional — Bowling Green, 
Glendale, and Vine Grove; Bellarmine Reg- 
ional — Trinity, Fern Creek, and Southern ; 
Bellevue Regional — Dayton ; Berea Regional 
— Meade Memorial and Berea Foundation. 
Individual runners in the regional events 
who qualified for the State Run by placing 
in the first ten in their respective regionals 
were: Leon Blythe, David Gilbert, and Ralph 
Sorrell of Lloyd Memorial; John Baxter of 



Lafayette ; Nathaniel Spencer of Louisville 
Central ; T. J. Logan of Lincoln Institute ; Don 
Matlock of Butler; Tom Clements and Don 
Cissell of St. Joe ; Jack Willmoth, James 
Rhein, and Larry Taulbee of Bellevue ; Billy 
Bauigh of Valley ; and Curtiss Branham 
Johns Creek. 

Seventy-three boys took part in the State 
Cross Counti-y Run. The order in which they 
finished is given below, including the times. 

1— Wine, Trinity (11:23); 2— Purdy, Pa- 
ducah Tilghman (11:33); 3— Clements, St. 
Joseph (11 :44) ; 4— Grace, Southern (11:49) ; 
.5— Baxter, Lafayette (11 :56) ; 6— Cissell, St. 
Joseph (11:57) ; 7 — Logan, Lincoln Institute 
(12:00) ; 8— Pawley, Bowling Green (12:06) ; 
9— Bealmear, Trinity (12:08); 10— Belcher, 
Bowling Green (12:09); 11— Cleary, Fern 
Creek (12:11) ; 12 — Spencer, Louisville Cen- 
tral (12:13); 13— GreenweH, Fern Creek 
(12:17); 14— Matlock, Butler (12:18); 15— 
Moll, Trinitv (12:20); 16— Stead, Southern 
(12:21) ; 17— Turner, Bowling Green (12:24); 
18— Larkin, Trinity (12:25) 19— Abney, 
Berea Foundation (12:26) ; 20 — Lewis, Berea 
Foundation (12:29); 21— Swan, Fern Creek 
(12:33); 22— Baugh, Valley (12:34); 23— 
Cunningham, Trinity (12:36) 24 — Branham, 
Johns Creek (12:38) ; Hoagland, Fern Creek 
(12:41) ; 26— Goodwin, Fern Creek (12:46) ; 
27— Perkins, Bowling Green (12:47): 28— 
Ward, Meade Memorial (12:48) ; 29— Kraus, 
Trinity (12:50); 30— Kindrick, Meade Me- 
morial (12:52); 31— Willmoth, Bellevue 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1957 



Page Nine 



BURGIN— BLUEGRASS SIX-MAN CONFERENCE CHAMPION 




il.c-fl tu KiKhli Front Row: Mj;r. Chu;ik. Rccd, Uobms, Knight, Shoiy. Crulchfield, Lowe-. Walls. Mgr. 
Kiahulek. Sucotul Row; Coach Marshall, Goodlett, William. Co.\, Brown, Campbell, Hayslett. Day, Montgomery. 



(12:53); 32 — Borders, Berea Foundation 
(12:55); 33 — Williamson, Berea Foundation 
(12:58) ; 34— Groce, Southern (13:00) ; 35— 
Brooks, Southern (13:01); 36— Hawkins, 
Vine Grove (13:02); 37— Morris, Berea 
Foundation (13:05); 38— Shelton, Vine 
Grove (13:06); 39— Ratliff, Meade Me- 
morial (13:07); 40 — Turner, Paducah 
Tilghman (13:10); 41— Panther, Trinity 
(13:12); 42— Chelf, Fern Creek (13:13) 
43— Maxwell, Paducah Tilghman (13:13.4) 
44_Badgley, Paducah Tilghman (13:14) 
45_Meek, Meade Memorial (13:14.5) 
46— Dadisman, Southern (13:15); 47— 
Rhein, Bellevue (13:16); 48— Derr, Sou- 
thern (13:18); 49— Baldwin, Dayton (13:- 
19); 50— Edwards, Bowling Green (13:23); 
51— Bewley, Vine Grove (13:24) ; 52— Walz, 
Dayton (13:27); 53— Hawkins, Vine Grove 
(13:28); 54— Polston, Bowling Green (13:- 
32); 55— Fitch, Meade Memorial (13:33); 
56— Hawkins, Fern Creek (13:35); 57— 
Cummins, Berea Foundation (13:36): 58 — 
Testerman, Dayton (13:37); 59— Hendrick, 
Bowling Green (13:37.5); 60— Lutz, Vine 
Grove (13:38) ; 61— Neely, Vine Grove (13:- 
39); 62— Wells, Southern (13:40); 63— Gil- 
bert, Lloyd (13:52); 64— Sorrell, Lloyd 
(13:55); 65 — Hocker, Paducah Tilghman 
(14:'0i5); 66— Taulbee, Bellevue (14:08); 67 



—Hancock, Paducah Tilghman (14:10); 68 
— Blair, Vine Grove (14:20); 69 — Jennings, 
Meade Memorial (14:29); 70 — Tiemen, Day- 
ton (14:30); 71 — Blackman, Berea Founda- 
tion (14:35); 72— Hartley, Dayton (14:40); 
73— Bl.ythe, Llo.vd (14:41). 



An Analysis of "Athletics" 

The "A" in athletics stands for ambition 
— ambition to be the best possible player in 
one's position on the team. 

The "T" in athletics stands for training — 
the first requisite of any athlete. 

The "H" in athletics stands for honesty — 
honesty to one's self and one's teammates. 

The "L" in athletics stands for loyalty — 
loyalty to team and school. 

The "E" in athletics stands for eligibility 
— without which an athlete is valueless to his 
team. 

The "T" in athletics stands for training — 
a trait all good athletes possess. 

The "I" in athletics stands for improve- 
ment — a thing that is always observable in 
good athletes. 

The "C" in athletics stands for courage — 
courage to do the thing that is right, regard- 
less of how the game is going. 

The "S" in athletics stands for stick-to-it- 
iveness — the best trait in any athlete. 

— Louisiana HSAA. 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1957 



Guest Editorials 

Championship Contests 

At various times, some very sincere school- 
men have voiced their opposition to champ- 
ionship contests. Perhaps the most frequent 
objections are the interruption of the school 
program and the emotional disturbance of 
pupils. 

Education, if it is to be whole, must train 
the emotions as well as the mind and body. 
All of us must be prepared to meet an emo- 
tional crisis whether it be our wedding, a 
death, entrance into a war, losses on the stock 
market, or victory or defeat in an athletic 
contest. Adolescents must be taught control 
of emotions. 

Generally, the days preceding holidays ; 
social events, such as proms ; graduation ; the 
first and last days of school and a host of 
incidents unnoticed by staid adults, are pro- 
ducers of emotional disturbances in adoles- 
cents. Budding Gables and Garbos have emo- 
tional upsets the night of the Senior Play. 

And there must be opportunity for emo- 
tional release. This is a part of life itself. 
And surely there are many times other than 
championship contests in the school program 
when emotions rise and fall. Even if it were 
good to eliminate emotional events, and we 
deny this, the elimination of championship 
events would not eliminate emotional dis- 
turbance. 

In our experience as a teacher and school 
administrator we had many interruptions but 
the chief cause was not athletic champion- 
ship play. In sports, few schools survive the 
first round every year. 

We found interruptions from a variety of 
sources. The music department with its 
bands, orchestras, choruses and special 
groups; the forensic division with oratory, 
extemporaneous speaking, debate, declama- 
tions, Shakespeare and poetry reading; the 
dramatic department and its plays, reviews 
and operettas ; the conventions of F.F.A., 
F.H.A., F.T.A., student councils and other 
groups ; the activities of the community with 
its campaigns, parades and civic organiza- 
tion work ; the celebration of special days ; 
the social program with its teas, parties, ban- 
quets, dances and prom; the field trips and 
tours and the innumerable essay, poster and 
other contests. 

One of the biggest jobs of an administrator 
is to so organize the school program that it 
can function efficiently despite interruptions. 
If a school program consisted only of the 



three R's, administration would be simple 
and the principal would need little skill as 
an administrator. 

Part of the difficulty in some schools is 
that the administrators do not exercise lead- 
ership in control. They succumb to pressures. 
We have seen a few schools declare "free 
days" after every victory. We have seen 
many where "free days" are unknown. Free 
days are an expensive luxury and school 
boards can easily see the expense if the analy- 
sis is presented. A school of 1,000 students 
may have 50' teachers. If all receive only the 
minimum salary a free day costs the district 
almost $1,000.00 in salary of teachers alone, 
besides the cost of the capital plant, main- 
tenance and administration. And if it is 
argued that missing a day is unimportant, it 
would seem to be reasonable to think that 
the time would have been wasted if school 
was in session. 

We have seen some schools where a team 
even during the regular season goes into 
seclusion the day before the contest. We have 
seen many where no one is dismissed early. 
We have seen schools in championship play 
"take off" for the scene of the game two days 
before the event. We have seen many who 
find it unnecessary. We have seen schools in 
championship play where no class time is 
lost. We have seen others who dismiss on 
the slightest provocation. We believe it is a 
matter of local policy and the infuence of the 
administration in setting the policy. 

— Editorial in the Pa'thlete. 



Do You Know Packey East? 

Does the name Packey East ring a bell? 
It's doubtful. 

Packey East grew up in Cleveland, Ohio. 
He was a pretty good kid. The first love of 
his early life was baseball, but it didn't take 
long for him to find out that the sport of 
baseball wouldn't hold much of a future for 
him. However, Packey East still had a desire 
to be the owner of a baseball team. Cleveland 
was his team — his favorite. 

Packey East finally turned to fighting. As 
a fighter in the amateur ranks he didn't do 
too badly. His size helped him greatly. He 
was powerfully built for a six-footer. 

At last he decided to turn professional. 
But Packey East was put against a really 
good man in his first pro fight. His opponent 
was tough, strong, and a hearty puncher. 

It was just as everyone figured it would be 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1957 



Pagre Eleven 



when Packey East met the more experienced 
boxer. Packey was knocked from one corner 
to the other. His opponent used him for a 
punching bag, never giving any quarter. 

The ringsiders nearly had a fit. They said 
that Packey East was a clown in the ring. 
Perhaps he should have never entered the 
ring, but out of that ring experience came 
one of the greatest persons in the modern 
world. Packey East long will be thought 
about more than the man who defeated him 
in his first professional fight. 

Packey East went on to buy part of his 
home town team, the Cleveland Indians. He 
is a man who will be remembered for years 
to come; a man who gave and still gives the 
world its laughter. He has made friends by 
the millions, he is loved for his comedy, and 
heartwarming friendship. Packey East went 
into the field of show business and changed 
his name to become the immortal and great 
comedian — Bob Hope. 

— The Henderson Gleaner & Journal. 



FLYING DUTCHMAN 

(Continued from Page Six) 

members, and to stimulate a professional at- 
titude toward school authorities. No associa- 
tion could have more lofty standards. 

The Board of Control of the K.H.S.A.A. 
and the Delegate Assembly must be credited 
with real progress when they included 
coaches in the basketball clinics this year. 
Already, there is plenty of evidence that 
coaches and officials are closer together. 
Coaches are more sympathetic with the prob- 
lems of officials, and officials are getting 
the coaches' viewpoint. Athletically, it was a 
good move, and, socially, it could not be ex- 
celled. 

The Com Cob Pipe Award of the month 
goes to O. L. Schultz, of Hartford. Professor 
Schultz, who has devoted his life to the 
young people of Kentuckv. served as Super- 
intendent of Schools in Hartford for many 
years. It was during his tenure that The 
Dutchman was trying to progress in the 
field of officiating, and it was always Profes- 
sor Schutz who would give a word of en- 
couragement. 

There never was a harder fighter than this 
Kentucky gentleman, nor one who was harder 
to defeat, nor one who would congratulate 
his victorious adversary more quickly than 
Professor Schultz. His exemplary life, plus 
the countless sacrifices he made personally 



for the happiness of others, qualifies him as 
the winner of The Dutchman's Corn Cob Pipe 
for December. 

As the Christmas Season arrives, it is well 
to remind all Kentuckians that the best 
Christmas present which can be given to the 
physically handcapped youngsters of our 
state is personal interest encouraging them 
to participate in sports. Somewhere there is 
a crippled boy or one handicapped by loss of 
an eye or possibly his hearing. Now is the 
time for you to wrap up his Christmas pres- 
ent by letting him know you'll help him 
and letting The Dutchman know where to 
send his Lionheart Lapel Button Award, 
making him eligible for the Game Guy Award 
of 1958. It's a Christian gift at Yuletime. 

Dick Van Hoose, Superintendent of Jeffer- 
son County Schools, has an idea which phy- 
sical educators as well as athletic coaches 
will welcome. Superintendent Van Hoose is 
exploring the possibility of setting up Par 
Three Golf Courses on school grounds. These 
courses are inexpensive to build, require 
little space and a youngster may play the 
course using only an iron and a putter. This 
gives him a sport which has carry-over value 
into later life. The Dutchman played eigh- 
teen holes with an 82-year-old man who shot 
80 and the old erentleman out-walked him all 
the way around the course. There's a lot to 
be said for a sport where an 82-year-old man 
can compete with us young fellows. 

Down Centre College way. when you hear 
the gridiron crowds yell. "Give it to 'Little 
Red,' " they're talking about Harold "Little 
Red" Craig, a Freshman halfback for the 
Colonels. Red's my boy-in-law. Every man 
wants a son because he wants an athlete in 
the family. The Dutchman is no different 
from the rest, vet he feai'ed always that he 
might sire a male cheerleader. So it was with 
relief that he learned that his daughter, 
Patricia, had married "Little Red." 

The Dutchman continues to be grateful for 
Shy Low, the "Doctor" Sanford cure-all 
which knocks laryngitis for a loop. We passed 
some on to Marvin Gay, of the Louisville 
Times, who had a husky throat. Immediately 
he picked up his bed and walked. It didn't 
work so well on Kelly Cocanougher, sports 
writer of the Times, who had a boil on his 
nose. After two doses, the boil is still there! 

Let's make Christmas merrier for those 
Game Guys. 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR DECEMBER, 1957 



Here and There 

MORE OR LESS PERSONAL: Roy Bed- 
ichek, former Texas Interscholastic League 
executive officer, is a proponent of whole- 
hearted competition as evidenced by the fol- 
lowing excerpt from his recent book, Educa- 
tional Competition. "If one is going in for 
competition at all, the desire to let everyone 
win is not, as it is sometimes called, 'soft- 
hearted', rather, it is merely 'soft-headed.' " 

Gernon Brown, veteran and highly respect- 
ed member of the Federation Football Rules 
Committee, will attend the January, 1958 
meeting in Lexington, Kentucky, in an advis- 
ory capacity. Gernon is no longer coaching 
and the revised Louisiana High School Ath- 
letic Association regulations specify that an 
active coach shall serve as its representative 
on the Federation Football Committee. 

V. E. Dozier, President of the Florida High 
School Activities Association and one of the 
genial hosts during last summer's National 
Federation meeting held in Miami Beach, 
suffered a severe heart attack during the fall 
months. Although he will be convalescing for 
some time, his many friends will be pleased 
to learn he is consistently improving. 

Robert Warren, Denver Security Life and 
Accident athletic insurance specialist, and 
his wife have returned from an extensive 
tour of England, Sweden, France and Ger- 
many, where a son is stationed. Bob reports 
an enjoyable trip but great pleasure in being 
back in the U. S. A. 

Dr. Clair Turner has been called back from 
retirement to again administer the program 
of the National Foundation for Infantile 
Paralysis during the critical period when, be- 
cause of the unusually effective work of the 
group, the general public has a tendency to 
believe that the battle has already been won. 
There are few groups which can point to as 
many tangible results. The Salk vaccine pro- 
gram has been so effective that there are 
literally thousands of individuals who have 
escaped infection when, by the law of aver- 
ages, they would have been affected except 
for the efforts of the National Foundation. 
The present difficulty is in convincing people 
that the danger, while reduced, is far from 
ended. 

The 1958 FOOTBALL QUESTIONNAIRE 
was distributed to approximately 20,000 in- 
dividuals. Summary of the returns will be 



made available at the January meeting of the 
National Committee in Lexington, Kentucky. 
Returns indicated a high degree of satisfac- 
tion with nearly all of the revisions which 
were authorized for the 1957 season. There 
was divided opinion concerning the desir- 
ability of the rule which prohibits an interior 
lineman from making any movement after 
he has placed a hand on the ground. In some 
cases, the dissatisfaction resulted from a 
lack of clear understanding and a lack of 
uniformity in enforcement. Among the items 
which were checked as having caused some 
degree of difficulty were : failure of the ends 
to be up to within one foot of the line of 
scrimmage and failure of backs to be at least 
one yard behind the line. A heavy majority 
favor retaining the rule which permits one 
player to talk to his coach at the sideline 
dui'ing a time-out charged to either team. 
Other topics on which opinions were ex- 
pressed on the questionnaire include a pro- 
posal that after a fair catch, a team be per- 
mitted to move the ball along the proper 
yardline between the side zones regardless of 
whether they choose to put the ball in play 
by a snap or by a free-kick ; a provision that 
would cause the ball to become dead as soon 
as a kick is first touched by the kickers ; a 
proposal to eliminate the tossing of a coin 
by giving the visitors the choice at the be- 
ginning of the game ; a proposal to permit 
the snapper to turn the ball if he chooses to 
snap it with the long axis parallel to the 
scrimmage line ; and a requirement that after 
a specified date, all hip and rib pads be of 
soft material or have a soft covering if of 
hard material. 



BASKETBALL QUESTIONS 

(Continued from Pag'e Seven) 

a technical foul instead of a special kind of 
violation ? 

3. Why shouldn't rules for throw-in after 
successful goal be the same as for any other 
throw-in ? 

4. Why should thrower-in from outside his 
front court be permitted to throw ball direct- 
ly to his back court? 

5. Why should dribbler's touching ball with 
both hands end the dribble? 

6. Why should a second air dribble be a 
violation? 



Why Champions Choose Fair-Play 




FF-IS 

The most popular basketball score- 
board made today! All aluminum 
alloy, light in weight and easy to 
install. Comes complete with brackets 
for hanging and with control having 
time-out clock and ten feet of cable 
attached. Size — 60" long by 41" high 
by 6V2" deep. All functional parts un- 
plug from front for ease of service 
and use in football scoreboard if de- 
sired. Price $465.00. Extra control 
cable 30c per foot. 




FD-60 

The FD-60 is an improved type of dial 
clock. Same size as the FF-IS. All 
aluminum alloy and all service from 
the front. Dial illuminated from rear 
and turns red least minute. Control 
is same type as the FF-IS but not in- 
terchaugable. Price $375.00. Extra 
cable 30c per ft. 



Hunt's have in stock all types of Fair-Pla.v score- 
boards and complete set of parts for .same ready 
for immediate shipment. 

No other scoreboard service in this area is equal 
to what we can give you. 

Champions become champions because the coach insists on 
perfection. Ordinary performance is not enough. For the 
same reason, schools that want the best in scoreboards 
insist on FAIR-PLAY. 

What is the difference? Fair-Play scoreboards have: 

All aluminum alloy cabinets for easy installation and 
corrosion resistance. Freight rates are low. 

Light banks have block type easy to read numerals with 
SEVEN lights vertical (not SIX) and with no disconcert- 
ing unlighted bulbs showing. Low voltage lights are used 
for economy and safety, and FAIR-PLAY boards have no 
bare, dangerous electrical sockets carrying' high voltage 
in contradiction to the NATIONAL ELECTRICAL CODE. 
Put the following on any order for scoreboards: "All 
wiring shall be consistent with the NATIONAL ELEC- 
TRICAL CODE, and there shall be no bare un-insulated 
sockets nor exposed wiring carrying 110 volts." 

SER\'ICE: No scoreboard made needs less service than 
a FAIR-PLAY, but if needed all service is from the front 
with board remaining on the wall. All units simply unplug 
(1) for quick exchange or repair and (2) for use in a 
football scoi'eboard at a big saving. 

ATTRACTIVENESS: HOME and VISITOR panels are 
lig'hted from rear, not just painted on board. Choice of 
colors. 

PRICE: .Add up the extras on the ordinary board, and the 
price equals or exceeds FAIR-PLAY. Brackets for sus- 
pending or mounting on wall are included. Time-out clock 
in control is included. There is no extra charge for quality 
materials and workmanship. 




Hunt's Athletic Goods Co. 

Phone 103 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

THE LARGEST EXCLUSIVE ATHLETIC HOUSE IN THE SOUTH 





Superior 

UTCLIFFE'S:::BASKETBALL 

Eqijifmext 



TOURNAMENT BALLS 

No. RSS Kawlings "Seam Sealed" 
Ply-Fused Basketball has been the 
official ball in the State Tournaments 
and will be an official ball for the 
1958 Tourney at Lexington. 

EACH $21 95 

No. 100. The famous Spalding 
"Last Bilf fully molder ball. Official 
ball for any tournament and will be 
one of the official balls sanctioned for 
the 195S State Tourney at Lexington. 

EACH $21.95 
BASKETBALL GOALS 




No. 260. Schutt "Rigid Build" are 
tops for all college and high school 
use — nothing- better. Complete with 
nets— Pair $11.25 

No. 338-H. Playground and Back- 
.\ard Practice Goals — Full official 
size and heavy weight — complete 
wiih nets— Pair $4.25 

No. BN 120. Extra Heavy Tourna- 
ment Nets — Pair $3.20 



OUTDOOR or 
' -. PLAYGROUND BALLS 

No. CB 2. The popular Voit Rubber 
Co. official top grade rubber covered 
ball for outdoor use. Not affected 

;\ by cinders, gravel, cement or wet 
'"^1 weather. For outdoors will outwear 
• I two or more of even the top grade 

/j leather balls. EACH $11.75 

No. L B 2. Another rubber cov- 
ered Basketball made by the Voit 
Rubber Co., but the inside carcass is 
not quite so durable as the No. CB 2 
above. EACH $5.00 

CONVERSE BASKETBALL SHOES 

finer and their "All-Star" 



Nothin 

shoes are demanded by roost of the 

top ranking College and Professional 

teams. 



NO. 9160. Converse 
Black Duck LTppers__ 
NO. 9162. Converse 
White Duck LIppers.. 
NO. 9350 Converse ' 
Black Duck Uppers... 

NO. 9350 Converse ' 



"All Star" 
.PAIR S7.50 
"All Star" 
.PAIR S7.50 
Luckv Boy" 
.PAIR S5.25 
Lucky Boy" 



N 



_...^ 



White Duck Uppers.. .PAIR S5.50 



MISCELLANEOUS 




No. 610. "Wigwam " Brand Basketball Sox- 
white wool >vith cotton reinforcement. PAIR 65c. 
No. 637. White Wool Sox with Colored Tops. 
Scarlet, Kelly, Royal, Lt. Gold, Purple, Maroon. 

PAIR 80c. 

No. 9. Official Basketball Score Book — Spiral 
wire binding — 25 games. EACH 70c. 
No. 166. Individual Suit Bag — 16 inch length — 
made of heavy leatherette material. EACH $2.10 

TROPHIES 

Tournament and individual Trophies in a com- 
plete Price Range — IN STOCK for "at once" ship- 
ment. Write us for catalog showing a complete 
assortment for your selection. 



m 



E SUTCLIFFE COMPA 



INCORPORATED 



225 S OUTH FO URTH ST 



HHum 



LOUISVILLE I. KENTUCKY 





High School AHiMe 

Trinity's State Championship Cross Country Team 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Wine, Bealmear, Panther, Cunningham. Second Ro« : 
Coach Denny, Larkin, Kraus, Moll. 

The team representing the Trinity High School of Louisville won the K.H.S.A.A. 
Cross Country Run, held in Lexington on November 16. The same group placed first 
in the Shamrock Run, held in Louisville ,on Thanksgiving Day. Charles Wine was the 
individual champion. 



Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

JANUARY - 1958 



Madisonville— Western Kentucky Athletic Conference Champion 






WP'^^^-*,t'''S^''''^V't^^'%^'^^' 



PS^V79^ 






\.*J^t " «< <*. * ** .** *• >'.)• i '<* 




(Left to Rieht) Krant Row: Mgr. DcBow. Luckctt. Ashb\. Kohrirds r.iirsiin. 1 llc^, Trci. Emhr^ 
Brown. Rucker, Hunsinser, Mer. Clements. Second Row (■ro»le%. R Buller. (ardwell. Kin'-helow 
Mabrev. .lordon. (Joodnfght. RoEer.t. Howard. Pidcock. DeMo^s, Woodruff. Mer. I'roctor. Third Row 
tloach Welbnrn. Richey. B. Butler. Carlisle, Poole, Whitledjse, ripente. Scott. Miller, Hudson, Hood, Ha^nll 
.loncs, Curti.s. Ass't. Coach Oaken. 



Conference Standings ^'^'^^'■" Kentucky Mountain conference 

Barren River Six-Man Conference 



Hiseville 


5 










Austin Tracy 


3 


2 







Caverna 


2 


3 







Park City 


2 


3 







Temple Hill 


1 


4 







Central Kentucky Conference 




Shelbyville 


7 








26.00 


Madison-Model 


7 


1 


1 


25.50 


Winchester 


7 


1 


1 


23.00 


Danville 


3 


2 





20.00 


Mt. Sterling- 


5 


4 





20.00 


Frankfort 


6 


3 


1 


19.75 


Nicholasville 


7 


2 





19.44 


Carlisle 


6 


1 





19.29 


Harrodsburg- 


3 


5 





15.00 


Georgetown 


4 


4 


1 


15.00 


Lancaster 


4 


4 





15.00 


Anderson 


3 


5 





13.75 


Cynthiana 


2 


(i 


1 


12.78 


Versailles 


1 


7 


1 


11. G7 


Irvine 


1 


7 





11.25 


Stanford 





5 





10.00 


Paris 





7 





10.00 


M. M. I. 


1 


2 


1 No 


Rating- 


Henry Clay 


2 


1 


No 


Rating- 


Somerset 





1 


No 


Rating- 


Cumberland 


Valley 


Conference 




Benham 


5 


1 







Lynch 


5 


1 







Loyall 


5 


2 







Black Star 


4 


2 







Evarts 


5 ■ 


3 







Hall 


3 


4 







Cumberland 


1 


5 







Wallins 


1 


<; 







Leslie Couiity 


U 


5 








Jenkins 


8 










Hazard 


4 


1 







Prestonsburg 


5 


2 







Fleming 


5 


2 







Belfry 


3 


3 







Paintsville 


3 


4 







Elkhorn City 


2 


3 







M. C. Napier 


1 


4 







Whitesburg 


1 


5 







Pikeville 





6 







Mid-Kentucky 


Conference 




Elizabethtown 


8 








26.00 


Lebanon 


4 


2 





20.00 


Bardstown 


4 


2 


1 


19.28 


St. Joseph Prep 


4 


3 





18.57 


Fort Knox 


1 


1 


3 


16.00 


Old Kentucky Home 


3 


4 


1 


15.62 


Springfield 


3 


4 





14.28 


Glasgow 


1 


2 


1 


13.75 


Shepherdsville 


1 


4 





12.00 


St. Charles 





7 





10.00 


Northeastern Kentucky 


Athletic Conference 


Catlettsburg- 


5 










Raeeland 


3 


1 


1 




Russell 


3 


2 







McKell 


2 


2 


1 




Louisa 





4 







Wurtland 





4 







Northern Kentucky Athletic Conference 


Highlands 


9 








30.00 


Boone County 


6 


1 


1 


24.38 


Dixie Heights 


6 


1 


1 


22.50 


Bellevue 


6 





3 


19.44 


Campbell County 


4 





3 


17.86 


Dayton 


3 





5 


13.75 


Holmes 


2 





4 


13.33 


Beechwood 


1 





3 


12.50 


Lloyd 


1 





(! 


12.25 


Newport 


1 


(1 


4 


12.00 


Ludlow 








7 


10.00 



(Continued on Page Sixteen) 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XX— NO. 6 



JANUARY, 1958 



$1.00 Per Year 



Commissioner s Message 

There are probably not enough hours in 
the day for the busy administrator and coach 
to do all the things they would like to do in 
setting up an efficient athletic program. 
However, there are several duties that fall in 
the "must" category in the matter of at- 
tempting to comply with Association regula- 
tions and policy. 

By-Law 17, Practice of Sportsmanship, is 
one of the finest regulations ever adopted 
by the Delegate Assembly. When it was first 
adopted it was the subject of discussion in 
many assembly programs. It is possible that 
it still is. Most high school games are now 
well policed, and reports of trouble are made 
promptly to the Commissioner's office. How- 
ever, manv school administrators no doubt 
fail to hold at least one assembly each year in 
which By-Law 17 and its implications are ex- 
plained. Although most students are aware of 
the fact that their conduct at an athletic 
contest might cause the suspension of their 
school, new members are being added to the 
student body each year, and these boys and 
girls should be told about the rule. A pi-ogram 
of education along this line should be started 
in grade school. 

In these times when high school graduates 
seem to get younger from year to year, a 
discussion of the need for checking on birth 
dates might appear to be academic. However, 
such is not the case. Occasionallv a school 
man will allow a boy who is too old to com- 
pete in athletics when the date given by the 
player during his first season of participation 
was entirely incorrect. Association regula- 
tions require that the principal verify the 
player's age by referring to vital statistics 
records. Many of our principals do not do 
this, feeling sure that the dates given by the 
players or found in current school records 
are correct. Such procedure may or may not 
be in violation of regulations, but the prin- 
cipal is running a great risk when he fails 
to get accurate information about the birth 
dates of his players. County clerks have 
bound copies of State Bureau records, based 



on information filed during the year of birth, 
and a trip to the clerk's office will usually get 
the necessary information. As explained in 
one of the interpretations given in the K.H. 
S.A.A. booklet, "A delayed certificate, based 
on information filed with the State Bureau 
of Vital Statistics several months or years 
subsequent to the date of birth, will not be 
accepted as proof of the correct date of 
birth." The Commissioner and the Board of 
Control prefer to accent the earliest available 
school enrollment and census records. 

Most disqualifications of players are now 
reported promptlv. However, at times the 
home principal does not receive from the 
official the information concerning the dis- 
qualification of the plaver. Since most 
coaches know about the disqualifications of 
their own players and those of the visiting 
team, it is suggested that the home coach 
see to it that his principal is notified about 
the players who have been disqualified. 

Most of our administrators and coaches 
are seeing to it that the officials whom they 
employ for their home games are given sign- 
ed contracts. This is as it should be. Many 
officials are naturallv hesitant about insist- 
ing on contracts, and the lead in this should 
be taken by the school men. Agreement on 
officials should be secured well in advance 
of the game, in compliance with Association 
regulations. 

The athletic transfer blank is becoming 
more popular, although it is still not used 
enough. If a player transfers, the first step 
in determining his possible eligibility at the 
new school is the sending of the transfer to 
the school from which he has transferred. 
When the completed form is returned to the 
new school, it should be forwarded on to the 
Commissioner with a coverino: letter giving 
additional pertinent information. Every day 
counts when a boy is trving to establish his 
plif^i'^ilitv at a new school. The nrocedure 
suggested is the best one for securing a rul- 
ing as soon as oossible. It is assumed, of 
ronrse. that the principal to whom the trans- 
fev blank is sent will fill out the form and 
return it at once. 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1958 



JANUARY, 1958 VOL. XX— No. 6 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1956-60). Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1957-61). Marion 

Directors— W. B. Jones (1957-61) Somerset: W. H. Crowdus 
(1954-58), Franklin: Jack Dawson (1954-58), Louisville; 
Robert P. Forsythe (1955-59), Greenville; K. G. Gillaspie 
(1965-59), Georgetown: Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60), Harlan. 
Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



-Xrom tne Commtssione'i s CJffi 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

5. 1957 Football Participation List 

2. School's Report on Football Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Football) 



"Approved" and "Certified" Officials 

As a result of the National Federation 
basketball examination given in Kentucky on 
December 2, 1957, a lars:e number of K.H.S. 
A. A. retjistered officials qualified for the 
advanceci ratings of "Approved" and "Certi- 
fied." The "Approved" rating does not carry 
forward from year to year, but must be 
earned each year. After an official has re- 
ceived the "Certified" rating, he keeps this 
rating by clinic attendance. Only officials 
receiving these higher ratings are eligible 
to work in the regional tournaments. Only 
"Certified" officials, who are residents of 
Kentucky, are eligible to work in the State 
Tournament. 

Basketball officials who qualified for ad- 
vanced ratings during the current season 
are as follows: 

Certified Officials 

Adkins, Raymond C. 
Alexander, Rex 
Almond. Alvin 
Baker, James E. 
Rallard, Jack H. 
Barnett. J. W. 
Bell, Thomas P. 
Bennett, Bei-t 
Betz, Richard L 
Blackburn, Clvde W. 
Blackburn. Viley 0. 
Bridgres. Bennie 
Brizendine, Vic 
Broderick, Carroll A. 
Brown, Bryant 
Brown, James W. 
Casteel, Raliih M. 
Chumbler, W. W. 
Coleman. L. J. "Duke" 
Combs, Travis 



LeVan, Thomas F. 
Long-, Bill 

Loneeneckpr. David M. 
Loonev, Dick 
McClellan. L. B. 
McCord, Anthonv 
McGuffey. Harold 
McLeod, Robert N. 
McPike, Rav S., Jr. 
Mahan, Boyd 
Macon. Alan Leon 
Maines, Georg-e 
Meade. Foster "Sid" 
Metcalf. Farl L. 
■ Miller, Bob 
Miller, Rex J. 
Miller, Roy J. 
Mudd, Ed 
Mussman. Ralph 
Nau, William E. 



Combs, Walter 
Conley, George 
Cooper, John Wellington 
Cooper, Warren 
Crawford, Fred T. 
Crosthwaite, John S., Jr. 
Cummins, Al 
Davis, Don 
Davis, Dwight R., Jr. 
Dotson, John B. 
Downing, Dero 
Duncan, Earl 
Durkin, Jack 
Eaton, James M. 
Eddings, Forrest 
Edelen, Ben R. 
EIrod, William Turner 
Feix, Jimmie 
Ferrell, Doctor T. 
Fey, Allen 
Fields, Joe D. 
Fitchko, Bill 
Forsythe, Robert 
Gardner, Howard E. 
Gates, William A., Jr. 
Gish, Delmas 
Goley, James E. 
Goranflo, R. E. 
Gustafson, Al, Jr. 
Heldman, John, Jr. 
Hewling, Franklin 
Hewling, Richard 
Hines, G. Cliff 
Hodge, Fred A. 
Hodges, Holbert 
Hofstetter, Joe 
Hudson, J. D. 
Hutt, Joe D., Jr. 
Irwin, Charles R. 
Jenkins, James 
Jenkins, Kean 
Johnson, Walter 
Jordan, Kenneth P. 
King, Bob 
King, Jim 
King, P. J. 
Kinman, Joe T. 
Knight, Bill 
Kremer. Joe 



Jr. 



Neal, Gene 
Nord, Ed 
Omer, Billy W. 
Padgett, R. K. 
Peay, Curtis 
Pergrem, Bernard 
Phelps, Ralph "Rudy" 
Powell, Logan 
Radjunas, Stan 
Ratterman, Bernard W. 
Redman, Malvern G. 
Reed, Gordon 
Rice, James F. 
Richardson, Joe M. 
Ricketts, C. O. 
Roberts, Earl C. 
Rocke, James M. 
Roller, Otis 
Rouse, Clyde L. 
Rozen, Morris 
Rubarts, Leland G. 
Russell, Allen W. 
Sanders, Mel 
Settle, Evan E., 
Settle, Roy G. 
Shaw, Stanley 
Sloan, Wallace 
Small, Bill 
Smith, Edgar J. 
Sosh, LaRue 
Stanfill, Robert 
Steenken, William R. 
Stephenson, Harry S. 
Strange, Bill 
Taylor, Ed 
Taylor, Robert S. 
Teague, Amos 
Thompson, Jack 
Thompson, Ralph 
Vettiner, Charlie 
Weisbrodt, Paul 
Welch, Ralph W. 
Whipple, Lloyd G. 
White, David B. 
Williams, Tom M., Jr. 
Winchester, Roy L. 
Winfrey, Shelby 
Woford, Ernest 
Wurtz, Emil 



Approved Officials 



Bell, Clarence 
Black. Charles D. 
Brantley, Al 
Brown, John W. 
Buis, Nathaniel 
Chattin, Charles E, 
Craft, Bill 
DiMuzio, Robert 
Drake, Richard 
Driskell, Earl, Jr. 
Flvnn, Bobby 
Gibson, Romulus 
Grisham. Jesse R. 
Hagan, Joe 
Hammons, Norman 
Harrell, Bill D. 
Haynes, John 
Inman, Briscoe 
Jones, Boyer 
Jones, George W 
King, Allen 
King, John J., Jr 



Jr. 



Lance, Walter N. 
Lucas, Gene 
Lusby, George 
Lytle, Price 
McClaskey, Booker 
Mahan, Carle "Buddy" 
Meyer, Bud 
Miller, William A. 
Moore, Robert W., Jr. 
Mouser, H. D. 
Newnam, Luther G. 
Ne^vton, C. M. 
Newton, Reason G. 
Oldham, John 
Richards, Jim S. 
Riggs, William T. 
Rothfuss, Dick 
Savior, Deward 
Schlich, Paul 
Snider, Louis G. 
Tipton, Asa I. 
Troutnian, Doyle 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1958 



Page Three 



1957 58 MEMBERSHIP IN THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSOCIATION 

REGION 1 



School 


Address 


Principal 


Basketball Coach 


D. 1 Carlisle County 


R. 3, Bardwell 


0. J. Mitchell 


Tom Adkins 


Central 


Clinton 


James H. Phillips 


James H. Phillips 


Fulgham 


R. 1, Clinton 


E. L. Clark 


William Cothran 


Fulton 


Hickman 


J. M. Martin 


Charles Thomas 


Fulton County 


Hickman 


Robert Summers 


James DeSpain 


Riverview 


Fulton 


A. W. Greene 


A. W. Greene 


D. 2 Ballard Memorial 


Barlow 


Richard L. Winebarger 


James Frank 


Heath 


R. 1, W. Padueah 


A. L. Roberts 


William E. Carter 


Lincoln 


Padueah 


E. W. Whiteside 


J. C. McVoy 


Lone Oak 


R. 6, Padueah 


John Robinson 


Don Stephenson 


Padueah Tilghman 


Padueah 


Bradford D. Mutchler 


Otis Dinning 


Reidland 


R. 8, Padueah 


Lyndle Barnes 


Thomas Stephenson 


St. John 


R. 5, Padueah 


Sr. Mary Marcia 




St. Mary's 


Padueah 


Sr. Aln-.a Clare 


Jack McKinney 


D. 3 Cuba 


R. 1, Mavfield 


Joe McPherson 


Ray Wormath 


Dunbar 


Mayfield 


F. L Stiger 


Asben-y Dawson 


Fancy Farm 


Fancy Farm 


Sr. Celine Maria 


Samuel Hayden 


Farming-ton 


Farming-ton 


J. Ernest Fiser 


Vernon R. Gates 


Lowes 


Lowes 


Henry 'Daniel 


Rex Smith 


Mayfield 


Mayfield 


Robert G. Fiser 


J. B. Story 


Sedalia 


Sedalia 


McCoy Tarry 


Cletus Hubbs 


Symsonia 


Symsonia 


Cecil Reid 


Joe Ford 


Win go 


Wingo 


Howard V. Reid 


John V. Yates 


D. 4 Almo 


Almo 


W. B. Miller 


W. B. Miller 


Benton 


Benton 


Delton Dodds 


Billv Joe Fan-is 


Douglass 


Murray 


L. P. Miller 


L. P. Miller 


Hazel 


Hazel 


Guy Lovins 


Bob Chaney 


Kirksey 


Kirksey 


M. B. Rogers 


George W. Dowdy 


Lynn Grove 


Lynn Grove 


Raymond L. Story 


Larry H. Colley 


Murray 


Murray 


Fred Schultz 


Glin Jeffrey 


Murray Training 


Murray 


Mac G. McRanev 


Garrett Beshear 


New Concord 


New Concord 


Edward T. Curd 


Gene Cathey 


North Marshall 


Calvert City 


Robert Goheen 


Charlie Lampley 


South Marshall 


R. 1, Benton 


Reed Conder 
REGION 2 


Joe Wilson 


D. 5 Caldwell County 


Princeton 


Guy G. Nichols 


Fred Clavton 


Crittenden County 


Marion 


Wilbur Horning 


Dean Akridge 


Dotson 


Princeton 


Bennie S. Miller 


Jerry W. Withrow 


Fredonia 


Fredonia 


Odell Walker 


Mervil Phelps 


Livingston Central 


Burna 


Kenneth T. Hardin 


Frank Wright 


Lyon County 


Kuttawa 


John A. Wells 


William Cothran 


Trigg County 


Cadiz 


John D. Minton 


Charles Quisenberry 


D. 6 Charleston 


Dawson Springs 


Lewis Good 


Jewel Logan 


Dalton 


Dalton 


A. 0. Richards 


Edwin Martin 


Dawson Springs 


Dawson Springs 


(Supt.) R. A. Belt 


George Perry 


Earlington 


Earlington 


James W. La-mouth 


James W. Larmouth 


Hanson 


Hanson 


Ina D. Moo'e 


Jerry Sisk 


Madisonville 


Madisonville 


Vincent Zachem 


C. G. Sherrill 


Million 


Earlington 


Lester G. Mimms 


Lester G. Mimms 


Nebo 


Nebo 


A. C. Carneal 


George Wooton 


Rosenwald 


Madisonville 


Mrs. Pearl Arnett 


Caldwell Smith 


South Hopkins 


R. 1, Nortonville 


Charles Jenkins 


Orlando Wyman 


D. 7 Attucks 


Hopkinsville 


Jacob H. Fronaugh 


William M. Falls 


Crofton 


Crofton 


L Fred Porter 


John Rendek 


Hopkinsville 


Hopkinsville 


Charles J. Petrie 


William Brannock 


Lacy 


R. 7, Hopkinsville 


Edward P. Hiekey, Jr. 


Don Holmes 


Pembroke 


Pembroke 


Mrs. L. W. Allen 


Lai-ry Tribble 


Sinking- Fork 


R. 5, Hopkinsville 


R. C. Johnson 


Charles E. Clayton 


South Christian 


Herndon 


Clovis W. Wallis 


Richard Covington 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1958 



School 



Address 



Clifty Clifty 

Guthrie Guthrie 

Todd County Elkton 

Todd County Trng. Elkton 



Principal 

0. P. Hurt 
H. C. Malone 
A. R. Rochelle 
Frank B. Simpson 



Basketball Coach 

O. P. Hurt 
Waldo Wolfe 
Wes Coffman 
Jimmie D. Harris 



REGION 3 



D. 9 Clay 
Dixon 
Providence 
Rosenwald 
Sebree 
Slaughters 

D. 10 Doug-lass 
Dunbar 
Henderson 
Henderson County 
Holy Name 
Morg'anfield 
St. Ag-nes 
St. Vincent 
Sturgis 
Uniontown 

D. 11 Bremen 
Calhoun 
Livermore 
Sacramento 



Clay 

Dixon 

Providence 

Providence 

Sebree 

Slaughters 

Henderson 

Morganfield 

Henderson 

Henderson 

Henderson 

Morganfield 

Uniontown 

St. Vincent 

Sturgis 

Uniontown 

Bremen 
Calhoun 
Livermore 
Sacramento 



D. 12 Daviess County Owensboro 

Owensboro Owensboro 

Owensboro Catholic Owensboro 

Owensboro Tech. Owensboro 

Utica Utica 

Western Owensboro 



Mrs. Irene Powell 
P. D. Fancher 
L. G. Tubbs 
W. O. Nuckolls 
James M. Lynch 
W. R. Birdwell 

H. B. Kirkwood 
E. R. Hampton 
R. R. Below 
Lewis N. Johnson 
Sr. Albert Mary 
Thomas Brantley 
Rev. R. G. Hill 
Sr. Frances Ann 
H'Earl Evans 
B. L. Sizemore 

K. Foi'bis Jordan 
L. D. Knight 
J. D. Boyken 
Paul Phillips 

J. T. Sandefur 
Joe O. Brown 
Sr. Joseph Mary 
Mrs. Evelvn B. Crick 
W. P. Wheeler 
H. E. Goodloe 



James A. Holland 
Morris Cofman 
L. G. Tubbs 
W. 0. Nuckolls 
James M. Lynch 
Eldon Bradley 

Peter Rembert 
Herschel Martin 
Don Chapman 
Norman O'Nan 
James K. Lindenberg 
Walter Banulle 
Rev. J. M. Mills 
Charles Gorman 
H. D. Holt, Jr. 
Yancy Lee Watkins 

Delbert Settle 
H. Hackworth 
Jesse L. Richards 
Bob Daniels 

W. B. Sydnor 
Robert Watson 
Harold Mischel 
John C. Simpson 
Frank A. List 
Robert Dowery 



REGION 4 



D. 1.3 Breckinridge Co. 
Flaherty 
Frederick Fraize 
Hawesville 
Irvington 
Lewisport 
Meade County 

D. 14 Brownsville 

Butler County 

Caneyville 

Clarkson 

Kyrock 

Leitchfield 

Sunfish 

D 15 Beaver Dam 
Centeitown 
Fordsville 
Hartford 
Horse Branch 



Hardinsburg 

R. 3, Vine Grove 

Cloverport 

Hawesville 

Irvington 

Lewisport 

Brandenburg 

Brownsville 

Morgantown 

Caneyville 

Clarkson 

Sweeden 

Leitchfield 

Sunfish 

Beaver Dam 

Centertown 
Fordsville 
Hartford 
Horse Branch 



D. 16 Central City Central City 

Drakesboro . Drakesboro 

D'boro Community Drakesboro 

Grabam Graham 

Greenville Greenville 

Hughes-Kirk Beechmont 

Muhlenberg Central Powderly 



R. F. Peters 

D. T. Starks 

Earl L. Grimes 

B. H. Crowe 

Edwin J. Mayes 

Forrest Williamson, Jr. 

Mrs. C. P. Miller 

J. P. Alexander 
m. Foyest West 
Ramon Ma,iors 
James M. Wood 
R. E. Hendrick 
(Supt.) H. W. Wilkey 
John M. Lane 

Shelby C. Forsythe, Jr. 
William T. Leach 
O. J. Allen 
Charles S. Combs 
W. M. Arnold 

Del mas Gish 
Willard J. Wileutt 
William Traylor 
James Jennings 
John R. Owens 
Lyle C. Baugh 
T. E. Spear 



Howard Owen 
D. T. Starks 
Owen Dieter'.e 
Denzel Mefford 
Jack Williamson 
Edgar Payne 
Willis Simpson 

Ivan Pogue 
W. 0. Warren, Jr. 
Hardin McLane 
Bowman Davenport 
Kaye Don VanMeter 
John H. Taylor 
Oren Webb 

Maurice Martin 
William Leach 
Aaron Turner 
Chai-les S. Combs 
Reathel Goff 

Delmas Gish 
Tom Neathamer 
N. E. Pritchett 
Wayne Ewing 
Hugh Smith 
Charles Fades 
Bill Stokes 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1958 



Page Five 



REGION 5 



School 
D. 17 Alvaton 

Bowling Green 

Bristow 

College 

Franklin-Simpson 

High Street 

Lincoln 

North fWarren 

Richardsville 

Warren County 

D. 18 Adairville 
Auburn 

Chandler's Chapel 
Lewisburg 
Olmstead 
Russellville 

D. 19 Allen County 
Austin Tracy 
Bunehe 
Glasgow 
Hiseville 
Park City 
Scottsville 
Temple Hill 

D. 20 Albany 

Cumberland Co. 
Gamaliel 
Marrowbone 
Metcalfe County 
Tompkinsville 



Address 

Alvaton 
Bowling Green 
Bristow 
Bowling Green 
Franklin 
Bowling' Green 
Franklin 
Smiths Grove 
Richardsville 
Bowling Green 

Adairville 

Auburn 

R. 2, Auburn 

Lewisburg 

Olmstead 

Russellville 

Scottsville 
Lucas 
Glasgow 
Glasgow 
Hiseville 
Park City 
Scottsville 
R. 4, Glasgow 

Albany 

Burkesville 

Gamaliel 

Marrowbone 

Edmonton 

Tompkinsville 



Principal 

Arthur M. Reynolds 
Raymond H. Herndon 
Prentice L. Gott 
Dero G. Downing 
J. W. Dunn 
E. T. Buford 
W. H. Stoi-y 
Andrew Renick 
George Coker, Jr. 
C. H. Harris 

0. W. Lovan 
H. M. Watkins 
Morris Shelton 
G. L. Summers 
W. N. Alexander 
Joseph G. Chaney 

T. C. Simmons 
Kenneth B. Sidwell 
L. J. Twyman 
Edwin R. Jones 
Lenis Reece 
W. L. Gardner 
H. H. Patton 
David Montgomery 

L. H. Robinson 
Lewis P. Williams 
Edwin Steen 
Ralph Clark 
Samuel L. Smith 
Randall Grider 



Basketball Coach 

Clarence R. Sallee 
Denval Barriger 
Jesse Kimbrough 
Alvin Almond 
Clarence Musgrave 

F. 0. Moxley 

G. Davis 
Eck Branham 

W. B. Gate 

John Sweatt 
Ronald Clark 
Tom Garrett 
Jim Young- 
Earl Shelton 
B. H. Weaver, Jr. 

James Bazzell 
Aaron Turner 
Ronald Hansford 
Earl Bradford 
George Sadler 
Lloyd Sharpe 
Ernest Neil, II 
Robert Pardue 

Lindle Castle 
James B. Coe 
Thomas E. Downing 
W. K. Norris 
Ralph Reece 
John C. Marrs 



REGION 6 



D. 21 Adair County 
Campbellsville 
Durham 
Greensburg 
Lebanon 
Rosenwald 
St. Augustine 
St. Charles 
St. Francis 
Taylor County 

D. 22 Buffalo 
Caverna 
Cub Run 
Hodgenville 
Magnolia 
Memorial 
Munfordville 



Columbia 

Campbellsville 

Campbellsville 

Greensburg 

Lebanon 

Lebanon 

Lebanon 

R. 2, Lebanon 

Loretto 

Campbellsville 

Buffalo 

Cave City 

Cub Run 

Hodgenville 

Magnolia 

Hardyville 

Munfordville 



Brooks Coomer 
Paul Coop 
M. J. Strong 
Eugene E. Tate 
Charles F. Martin 
Nettie L. Smith 
Sr. Doloretta Marie 
Sr. M. Raphael 
Si-. Charles Asa 
J. G. McAnelly 

Edwin R. Hai-vey 
Roy D. Reynolds, Jr. 
James E. Redden 
Everett G. Sanders 
Stuart Pepper 
Lynn D. Thompson 
H. D. Puekett 



John Burr 
Paul Coop 

Samuel V. Wickliffe 
Richard Shrewsbury 
John B. Tapscott 
Herbert Jones 
James E. Hargadon 
Thomas Clark 
Sam Thomas 
Billy B. Smith 

Munford Singleton 
Ralph C. Dorsey 
Clyde E. Smith 
Cortland K. Cox 
Little C. Hale 
Jimmy Edwards 
Don B. Bales 



D. 23 Elizabethtown 
E'town Catholic 
Ft. Knox 
Glendale 
Howevalley 
Lynnvale 
Rineyville 
Sonora 
Vine Grove 



FJizabethtown 
Elizabethtown 
Ft. Knox 
Glendale 
R. 1, Cecilia 
White Mills 
Rineyville 
Sonora 
Vine Grove 



Paul E. Kerrick 
Sr. Nerinx Marie 
S. M. Matarazzo 
Damon Ray 
Earl B. Goodman 
Paul Ford Davis 
H. L. Perkins 
Dellard Moor 
James T. Alton 



Charles Rawlings 
Johnny Neverstitch 
William Waller 
Edwin Goodman 
Bill Jones 
David Buchanan 
Clarence Perkins 
Bobby Houk 
Chester Redmon 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1958 



School 
D. 24 Bardstown 

Bardstown Trng. 

Bloomfield 

Fredericktown 

Mackville 

Old Ky. Home 

St. Catherine 

St. Joseph Prep. 

Springfield 

Willisburg 



Address 

Bardstown 

Bardstown 

Bloomfield 

Springfield 

Mackville 

Bardstown 

New Haven 

Bardstown 

Springfield 

Willisburg 



Principal 

Floyd Hall 
Chai'les H. Woodson 
T. T. Etheredge 
Sr. Mary Ephram 
Shelby Mason 
J. H. Harvey 
Sr. Jean Mark 
Bro. DeSales 
Bennett R. Lewis 
L. H. Anthony 



Basketball Coach 

Garnis Martin 
Charles H. Woodson 
Ernest Ruby 
Robert Hamilton 
Lloyd Haydon 
Bill Parrott 
Rev. L. A. Hardesty 
John Stoll 
Joseph A. Jake 
L. H. Anthony 



REGION 7 



D. 2.5 Ahrens Trade 
Central 
DeSales 
duPont Manual 
Flaget 

J. M. Atherton 
Male 

St. Xavier 
Shawnee 

D. 26 Butler 
Durrett 
Eastern 
Fern Creek 
Ky. Mill. Inst. 



Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 
Louisville 

Louisville 
Louisville 
Middletown 
Fern Creek 
Lyndon 



Ky. School for Blind Louisville 
Lou. Country Day Louisville 
Southern Louisville 

Trinity Louisville 

Valley Valley Station 

Waggoner Louisville 



Alfred H. Meyer 
Atwood S. Wilson 
Rev. Jude J. Cattelona 
Arthur J. Ries 
Bro. Cyril 
Russell Garth 
W. S. Milburn 
Bro. Thomas More 
Robert B. Clem 

H. L. Hatfield 
J. C. Bruce 
John W. Trapp 
W. K. Niman 
N. C. Hoda-in 
(Supt.) L. P. Howser 

Harry F. Ludwig 

T. T.' Knight 

Rev. A. W. Steinhauser 

J. C. Cantrell 

John B. Lowe 



Thomas H. Bryant 
William L. Kean 
James Swann 
James Riffey 
Paul Miller' 

Guy Strong 
Gene Rhodes 
Jerome Keiffner 

Lucian Moreman 
Donald B. Brooks 
William Hoke 
Roy Winchester 
W. T. Simpson 

Delmar Wallace 
Clarence Smith 
Charles E. Quire 
Garland Garrison 
Roy Adams 



REGION 8 



D. 29 Lebanon Junction 
Mt. Washington 
Ormsby Village 
St. Benedict 
Shepherdsville 

D. .30 Bagdad 

Lincoln Institute 

Shelbyville 

Simpsonville 

Taylorsville 

Waddy 

D. 31 Campbellsburg 
Eminence 
Henry Central 
Oldham County 
Pleasureville 
Trimble County 

D. 32 Carrollton 

Gallatin County 
Grant County 
Owen County 
Williamstown 



D. 33 Boone County 
Dixie Heights 
Lloyd 
St. Henry 
Simon Kenton 
Walton-Verona 



Lebanon Junction 
Mt. Washington 
Anchorage 
Lebanon Junction 
Shepherdsville 



Lincoln Ridge 

Shelbyville 

Simpsonville 

Taylorsville 

Waddy 

Campbellsbui'g 

Eminence 

New Castle 

LaGrange 

Pleasureville 

Bedford 

Carrollton 
Warsaw 
Dry Ridge 
Owenton 
Williamstown 



Florence 

S. Ft. Mitchell 

Erlanger 

Erlanger 

Independence 

Walton 



Thomas S. Jeffries 

C. L. Francis 
Anna B. Moss 
Sr. Aline Maria 
Willis G. Wells 

Harding Lowry 
Mrs. Kathleen Carroll 
Elmo C. Head 
Bruce Sweeney 
Harvey A. Bush 
W. R. Martin 

G. H. England 
Paul Watts 

D. P. Parsley 
Roy H. Dorsey 
Robert Keene 
T. A. Parrish 

Palmore Lyles 
John M. Potter 
Ralph Blakey 
Cyrus E. Greene 
(Supt.) William T. McGraw 

REGION 9 

Chester Goodridge 
Willard N. Shropshire 
James Tichenor 
Sr. M. Clarita 
R. C. Hinsdale 
James S. Smith 



Glenn B. Smith 
L. W. Mullins 
B. G. DeVasher 
Anthony Booth 
Joe B. Hall 

Arnold Thuvman 
W. Gilliard 
Evan Settle 
Randal Pelfrey 
Sidney Krieger 
Bill Gordon' 

J. M. Bailey 
Paul Watts 
Lee Peyton 
Barney Thweatt 
Howard Corder 
Ray Pigman 

Shirley Kearns 
Charles Sutherland 
Delbert Walden 
Paul Marshall 
Dewey A. Parson 



Duncan Huey 
Lewis Phillips 
Paul Champion 
James O'Connell 
William Faulkner 
C. M. Ewing 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1958 



Page Seven 



School Address 

D. 34 Beechvvood S. Ft. Mitchell 

CovingtoTi Catholic Covington 

Holmes Covington 

Holy Cross Covington 

Ludlow Ludlow 

Villa Madonna R. 2, Covington 

William Gi-ant Covington 

D. 35 Bellevue Bellevue 

Dayton Dayton 

Newport Newport 

Newport Catholic Newport 



Principal 

Thelma W. Jones 
Bro. Julius May 
Harry T. Mitchell 
Sr. Judith 
Arthur T. Tipton 
Sr. Aileen 
Charles L. Lett 

Donald Davis 
Kenneth Kuhnert 
James L. Cobb 
Rev. John V. Hegenauer 



Basketball Coach 

Harold Williams 
Robert Naber 
Tom Ellis 
Edward Toner 
Heulyn Bishop 

James Brock 

Roy McKenney 
George Houston 
Stan Amzen 
James Connor 



D. 36 Campbell County 
Highlands 
St. Mary 
St. Thomas 
Silver Grove 



Alexandria 
Ft. Thomas 
Alexandria 
Ft. Thomas 
Silver Grove 



Edward E. Ball 
Harold Miller 
Sr. Mary Honora 
Sr. Mary Barbara 
Robert F. Dozier 



Lawrence Kinney 
Owen Hauck 

Rev.Raymond A. Baumann 
Richard Hehman 
Tom L. Gabbard 



REGION 10 



D. 37 Cvnthiana 
Garth 

Harrison County 
Scott County 



Cynthiana Kelley B. Stanfield 

Georgetown (Supt.) K. G. Gillaspie 
Cynthiana Joe H. Anderson 

R. 3, Georgetown Tony Raisor 



James Cinnamon 
Dorman A. McFarland 
Kenton Campbell 
Bob Barlow 



D. 38 Augusta 

Bracken County 

Butler 

Deming 

Falmouth 

Morgan 

D. 39 Fleming County 
May's Lick 
Maysville 
Minerva 
Orangeburg 
St. Patrick's 
Tolesboro 



Augusta 

Brooksville 

Butler 

Mt. Olivet 

Falmouth 

Morgan 

Flemingsburg 

May's Lick 

Maysville 

Minerva 

R. 3, Maysville 

Maysville 

Tollesboro 



Alice Kate Field 
Jarvis Parsley 
Patrick E. Napier 
Herman 0. Hale 
(Supt.) L. H. Lutes 

Richard Gulick 

Leroy Dorsey 
Glynn D. Baucom 
Orville B. Hayes 
William Ryan 
Charles Browning 
Sr. M. Monica 
Eugene Pox 



Albert Kennard 
Jarvis Parsley 
Dwight L. Wolfe 
Herman O. Hale 
Cecil Hellard 
Richard Gulick 

Clay Evans 
Jesse Lee Amburgey 
Woodrow Crum 
William Ryan 
Sam Craig 
Francis A. Stahl 
Harlan Tolle 



D. 40 Bourbon County Paris 

Carlisle Carlisle 

Millersburg M. Inst. Millersburg 

Nicholas County Carlisle 

North Middletown North Middletown 

Paris Paris 

Western Paris 



Joe E. Sabel 
Nancy E. Talbert 
Mai. Sherrill Coleman 
Willard Sandidge 
J. C. Falkenstine 
Alonzo Combs 
W. B. Reed 



Fred Reece 
William E. Leedy 
Lt. Herman Bolin 
Charles Finnell 
Fred Creasey 
Charles Straub 
W. B. Reed 



REGION 11 



D. 41 Bald Knob 
Bridgeport 
Elkhoim 
Frankfort 
Good Shepherd 
Peaks Mill 



R. 4, Frankfort 

R. 2, Frankfort 

Frankfort 

Frankfort 

Frankfort 

Frankfort 



H. Emerson Jenkins 
W. Roy Bondurant 
Ronald Connelly 
F. D. Wilkinson 
Sr. Charles Benedict 
Howard Cohorn 



Ray Butler 
J. Lapsley Cardwell 
Claude Logan 
Homer Bickers 
Charles Furr 
Eddie Ward 



D. 42 Anderson 
Burgin 
Harrodsburg 
Mercer 
Midway 
Simmons 
Versailles 
Western 



Lawrenceburg 

Burgin 

Harrodsburg 

Harrodsbui-g 

Midway 

Versailles 

Versailles 

Sinai 



Walter Marcum 
D. R. Riggins 
A. F. Young 
A. L. Berry 
(Supt.) Bernard C. Gravitt 
W. J. Christy 
Charles Dawson 
Robert B. Turner 



Jim Bovd 
Bill Marshall 
"Aggie" Sale 
Ralph Amos Black 
Ed Allin 
Charles J. Lee 
James McAfee 
Charles Dixon 



Page Eight 


THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1958 


School 


Address 


Principal 


Basketball Coach 


D. 43 Athens 


R. 5, Lexington 


R. L. Grider 


Robert Ahney 


Douglass 


Lexington 


Mrs. Theda Van Lowe 


Charles Livisay 


Henry Clay 


Lexington 


C. T. Lassiter 


Elmer T. Gilb 


Lafayette 


Lexington 


H. L. Davis 


Ralph Carlisle 


Lexington Catholic 


Lexington 


Rev. Leo G. Kampsen 


Fred O'Brien 


Nicholasville 


Nicholasville 


Billy Lockridge 


Elmer Stephenson 


P. L. Dunbar 


Lexington 


P. L. Guthrie 


S. T. Roach 


Rosenwald Dunbar 


Nicholasville 


Edward D. Taylor 


Leonard J. Cavil 


University 


Lexington 


Morris Cierlev 


Eugene Huff 


Wilmore 


Wilmore 


Dan R. Glass' 


Bill Maxwell 


D. 44 Berea 


Berea 


Mrs. Morris Todd 


Jim Mitchell 


Estill County 


Irvine 


Luther Patrick 


Rodney Brewer 


Foundation 


Berea 


Rov N. Walters 


Doug Massey 


Irvine 


Irvine 


Joe Ohr 


Joe Ohr 


Madison Centi'al 


R. 5, Richmond 


J. B. Moore 


Russell Roberts 


Madison-Model 


Richmond 


T. L. Arterberry 

REGION 12 


Zeb Blankenship 


D. 45 Bate 


Danville 


William Summers 


Robert 0. Hawkins 


Buckeye 


R. 3, Lancaster 


Mrs. Gladys Bruner 


Harold Murphv 


Cp. Dick Robinson 


R. 5, Lancaster 


W. R. Tudor 


Earl Shaw 


Danville 


Danville 


Don R. Rawlings 


Leon Kingsolver 


H Forkland 


Gravel Switch 


Garland Purdom 


Donald Lamb 


Junction City 


Junction City 


Earl Cocoanougher 


Roy Allison 


Lancaster 


Lancaster 


Stan'ey Marsee 


Leslie C. Dyehouse 


Mason 


Lancaster 


Mrs. Tommie F. Meritt 


Clay E. Palmer 


Paint Lick 


Paint Lick 


Mrs. Faye Ward Little 


W. R. Duerson 


Parksville 


Fai-ksville 


Joseph E. Wesley 


Hillard Combs 


Perryville 


Perryville 


M. W. Rowe 


Harlan Peden 


D. 46 Brodhead 


Brodhead 


D. A. Robhins 


Vesper Singleton 


Crab Orchard 


Crab Orchard 


Rufus Harris 


Howard Foley 


Hustonvillo 


Hustonville 


Cecil Purdom 


Jack Johnson 


Liberty 


Liberty 


Garland Creech 


William P. Tully 


Lincoln 


Stanford 


G. W. Parks 


H. C. Welch 


Livingston 


Livingston 


( harles B. Parsons 


Preston Parrett 


McKinney 


McKinney 


31. C. Montgomery 


Lloyd Gooch 


Memorial 


Waynesburg 


Lawrence Hale 


Doyle McGuffey 


Middleburg 


Middleburg" 


Nathaniel Buis 


Truman Godby 


Mt. Vernon 


Mt. Vernon 


William Landrum 


Jack Laswell 


Stanford 


Stanford 


Denzil J. Ramsey 


Denzil J. Ramsey 


D. 47 Burnside 


Burnside 


Hobert B. Branscum 


Roy Gill 


Eubank 


Eubank 


J. B. Albright 


Beldy Massey 


Ferguson 


Ferguson 


Howard Taft Moore 


Robert Claunch 


McCreary County 


Whitley City 


Dewey Ball 


Joe S. Williams 


Monticelio 


Monticelio 


(Supt.) Robert E. Woosley 


Joe Harper 


Nancy 


Nancy 


Herbert T. Higgins 


M. A. Warner 


Pine Knot 


Pine Knot 


Mrs. C. D. Harmon 


Delnion Carson 


Pulaski County 


Somerset 


Edward B. Webb 


Robert Randall 


Russell County 


Russell Springs 


Norman Antle 


Charles Mrazovich 


Shopville 


Shopville 


Raymond Combs 


J. S. Jones 


Somerset 


Somerset 


W. B. Jones 


Ed Tucker 


Stearns 


Steams 


(Supt.) C. W. Hume 


Joel C. Boyer 


Wayne County 


Monticelio 


.•\rthur J. Lloyd 


Bill Kelley 


D. 48 Bush 


Lida 


C. Frank Bentley 


Claude McKnight 


Hazel Green 


Eist Bernstadt 


Clark E. Chesnut 


Holbert Hodges 


Lily 


Lily 


R. S. Baldwin 


Harold Storm 


London 


London 


Leighton Watkins 

REGION 13 


Glenn Combs 


D. 49 Annville Institute 


Annville 


Paul K. Teague 


Jerry Hacker 


Clav County 


Manchester 


Robert Campbell 


J. W. Thurman 


McKee 


McKee 


Kermit C. Bowman 


Charles Norris 


Oneida Institute 


Oneida 


Joe L. Mobley 


Joe T. Gregory 


Tyner 


Tyner 


James W. Wilson 


Ivan Jack Powell 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1958 



Page Nine 



School 


Address 


D. 50 Barbourville 


Barbourville 


Corbin 


Corbin 


Knox Central 


Barbourville 


Lynn Camp 


Corbin 


Pleasant View 


Pleasant View 


Poplar Creek 


Carpenter 


Rockhold 


Rockhold 


Rosenwald 


Barbourville 


St. Camillus 


Corbin 


Williamsburg 


Williamsburg 


Woodbine 


Woodbine 


D. 51 Bell County 


Pineville 


Henderson Settle. 


Frakes 


Lincoln 


Middlesboro 


Lone Jack 


Four Mile 


Middlesboro 


Middlesboro 


Pineville 


Pineville 


Red Bird 


Beverly 


D. 52 Benham 


Benham 


Black Star 


Alva 


Cumberland 


Cumberland 


East Benham 


Benham 


East Main Street 


Lynch 


Evarts 


Evarts 


Hall 


Grays Knob 


Harlan 


Harlan 


Loyall 


Loyall 


Rosenwald 


Harlan 


Wallins 


Wallins 


West Main Street 


Lynch 



Principal 

(Supt.) Charles Singleton 
H. A. Howard 
Clinton B. Hammons 
P. M. Broughton 
Rev. Clive Smith 
Charles M. Lawson 
Dan L. Cobb 
Grace L. Etter 
Sr. Elizabeth Marie 
H. B. Steely 
Raymond Wells 

James A. Pursifull 
C. E. Calloway 
Esther R. Ball 
Chester L. Click 
Shelvie R. Fuson 
Effie Amett 
P. P. Estridge 

(Supt.) James H. Powell 
William L. Mills 
Kendall Boggs 
J. A. Matthews 
Sam Potter 
Claude R. Dozier 
Charles R. Steele 
Roy G. Teague 
Lee Jones 
William M. Wood 
John H. Howard 
John V. Coleman 



Basketball Coach 

H. D. Tye 
Harry Taylor 
Harold Cole 
James Messer 
Earl R. Centers 
Tony McKiddy 
Glen Leger 
Albert Gregory 
Rev. J. Tyriell Keller 
J. B. Mountjoy 
Warren Peace 

Willie Hendriekson 
A. H. York 
Arlee McKinney 
G. B. Hendriekson 
James Summers 
Orville Engle 
Raymond Shilt 

Charles A. Davis 
Shirley Goodin 
Fred Parsons 
Thomas J. Harville 
Ed Miracle 
Charles Hunter 
Joe Campbell 
Joe Gilly 
Needham Savior 
E. R. Gray 
James L. Howard 
Eugene Traylor 







REGION 14 




D. 53 Dunham 


Jenkins 


G. V. Curry 


W. H. Lewis 


Fleming-Neon 


Fleming- 


Roy T. Reasor 


Rex Chaney 


Jenkins 


Jenkins 


Dave L. Craft 


Ray G. Russell 


Kingdom Come 


Linefork 


W. W. Watts 


B. Breeding 


Letcher 


Letcher 


Jeff B. Mayes 


H. E. Wright 


Whitesburg 


Whitesburg 


J. M. Burkich 


Ernest Trosper 


D. 54 Buckhom 


Buckhorn 


Marshall Colwell 


Fred W. Johnson 


Dilce Combs 


Jeff 


Grazia Combs 


James F. Buckner 


Hazard 


Hazard 


H. M. Wesley 


Goebel Ritter 


Leatherwood 


Slemp 


Bingham Brashear 


Joe Gill 


Leslie County 


Hyden 


Roscoe Turner 


Paul Tesla 


Napier 


Hazard 


Monroe Fugate 


Pete Grigsby, Jr. 


Stinnett Settlement 


Hoskinston 


Raleigh L. Couch 


Kenneth Wilson 


D. 55 Breathitt 


Jackson 


Millard Tolliver 


Fairce Woods 


Carr Creek 


Carr Creek 


Morton Combs 


Morton Combs 


Cordia 


R. 2, Hazard 


Alice H. Slone 


George W. Cornett 


Hindman 


Hindman 


Claude Frady 


Pearl Combs 


Jackson 


Jackson 


Oiloff L. Knarr 


James B. Goff 


Knott County 


Pippa Passes 


Lovell Ison 


Edward Madden 


Magoffin Bap. Inst. 


Mountain Valley 


A. B. Joseph 


A. B. Joseph 


Riverside Ch. Tmg. 


Lost Creek 


Adah I. Drushal 


John Teed 


D. 56 Hazel Green Acad. 


Hazel Green 


Mrs. Henry A. Stovall 


Monte Brown 


Lee County 


Beattyville 


Blaine Martin 


H. K. Hampton 


Owsley County 


Booneville 


W. 0. Gabbard 


John D. Scale 


Powell County 


Stanton 


H. G. Pennycuff 


Bill Orme 


Wolfe County 


Campton 


Frank Rose 


A. M. Richie 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1958 



School 

D. 57 Belfry 
Dorton 
ElkhoiTi City 
Feds Creek 
Hellier 
Johns Creek 
MuUins 
Phelps 
Pikeville 
Virgie 

1). 58 Auxier 

Betsy Layne 

Garrett 

McDowell 

Mai-tin 

Maytown 

Prestonsburg 

Wayland 

Wheelwright 

D. 59 Blaine 

Flat Gap 

Inez 

Louisa 

Meade Memorial 

Paintsville 

Van Lear 

Warfield 

1). 60 Ezel 

Morgan County 
Oil Springs 
Salyersville 
Sandy Hook 

D. 61 Camargo 

Clark County 
DuBois 

Menifee County 
Montgomery Co. 
Mt. Sterling 
St. Agatha 
Winchester 

D. 62 Breckinridge Trng. 
Haldeman 
Morehead 
Owingsville 
Sharpsburg 

D. 6.3 Carter 
Erie 

Hitchins 
Olive Hill 
Prichard 



Addre.ss 

Belfry 

Dorton 

Elkhorn City 

Feds Creek 

Hellier 

Pikeville 

Pikeville 

Phelps 

Pikeville 

Virgie 

Auxier 

Betsy Layne 

Garrett 

McDowell 

Martin 

Langley 

Prestonsburg 

Wayland 

Wheelwright 

Blaine 
Flat Gap 
Inez 
Louisa 
Williamsport 
Paintsville 
Van Lear 
Warfield 

Ezel 

West Liberty 
Oil Springs 
Salyersville 
Sandv Hook 



Mt. Sterling 
Winchester 
Mt. Sterling 
Frenchburg 
Mt. Sterlino- 
Mt. Sterling 
Winchester 
Winchester 

Morehead 

Haldeman 

Morehead 

Owingsville 

Sharpsburg 

Carter 
Olive Hill 
Hitchins 
Olive Hill 
Grayson 



V'burg-Lewis Co. Vanceburg 



D. 64 Ashland 

B. T. Washington 

Boyd County 

Catlettsburg 

Fairview 

Greenup 

Holv Family 

McKell 

Raceland 

Russell 

South Portsmouth 

Wurtland 



Ashland 

Ashland 

R. 2, Ashland 

Catlettsburg 

Ashland 

Greenup 

Ashland 

South Shore 

Raceland 

Russell 

South Portsmouth 

Wurtland 



REGION 15 

Principal 

W. F. Doane 
Charles E. Morgan 
James V. Powell 
Nelson Hamilton, Jr. 
William M. Justice 
Quentin R. Howard 
Landon Hunt 
Joe B. Elswick 
Clyde Senters 
Fred W. Cox 

John C. Wells 
D. W. Howard 
Charles Clark 
George L. Moore 
James W. Salisbury 
Edwin V. Stewart 
James V. Bolen 
Lawrence B. Price 
Boone Hall 

Paul H. Gambill 
Virgil Porter 
Russell Williamson 
Frank A. Webster 
Russell Boyd 
Oran C. Teater 
(Supt.) Hysell Burchett 
Forrest L. Preece 

William A. Heagen 
Lloyd E. Patterson 
Willis H. Conley 
Creed Arnett 
Rov Lewis 
REGION 16 

Walter H. Power 
Letcher Norton 
Arthur R. Hawkins 
Ora Watts 
William D. Smart 
Dawson Orman 
Sr. Caroline Mary 
Eunice Haggard 

James Merle Howard 
James O. Botts 
Calvin Hunt 
Edsel L. Karrick 
J. B. Cunningham 

Thomas E. Phillips 
Mildred E. Linard 
Harold H. King 
Hayden C. Parker 
Max E. Calhoun 
Teddy Applegate 

H. L. Ellis 
C. B. Nuckolls 
Webb Young 
Frank Burns 
Louis Manning 
Mrs. Ann Sammons 
Sr. Mary Providence 
Cliff Lowdenback 
Denver Ball 
Frank V. Firestine 
Foster Meade 
Stanley Ramey 



Basketball Coach 

Jim Hutchins 
Monroe Hall 
Arthur Mullins 
W. S. Risner 
Haskell Stanley 
Glen D. McDowell 
Gary Layne 
George Bailey 
John B. Trivette 
Johnny Benedict 

Bill Goebel, Jr. 
Tommy Boyd 
J. E. Campbell, Jr. 
Estil Hall 
Denzil Halbert 
Ray Heinisch 
Jack F. Wells 
Gene Fi-asure 
Don Waller 

Paul H. Gambill 
F. S. Stapleton 
Ira Adams 
Tom Lucia 
Wendell Wallen 
Jim Wheeler 
Howard Ramey 
Johnny Marcum 

W. A. Caudill 
Merle Nickell 
Howard C. Yates 
Leonard Marshall 
Len Stiner 



Luther Risner 
Letcher Norton 
William Elster 
Harry Howard 
Eugene Clark 
James Floyd 
Doyle Stone 
Alex Stevens 

John Sonny Allen 
Jack Roberts 
Warren Cooper 
Donnie Gaunce 
Julian R. Cunningham 

Glenn Sparks 
Todd Tennyson 
John R. Hartig 
Andrew J. Fultz 
Harold Holbrook 
Robert Wright 

Fred Anson 
W. A. West 
Delmis Donta 
Dale Cravcraft 
W. A. Harris 
H. R. Bowling 
Rev. Joseph Dunne 
Ben Webb 
Ronnie Potter 
Marvin Meredith 
Howard Shumate 
Fred Smith 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1958 



Page Eleven 



The Flying Dutchman 

"A most unusual Kentuckian" is a good 
way to describe Glasgow's George Carr Gan- 
ter. A strong supporter of the K.H.S.A.A. 
Game Guy program for the physically handi- 
capped, George Carr says that the encour- 
agement given unfortunate athletes to com- 
pete in sports despite physical misfortunes 
is Christian as well as community service. 
His son, George, Jr., overcame Polio in 1953 
to become one of the Commonwealth's Game 
Guys. 

A winner of the Corn Cob Pipe of Honor 
Award in 1953 for his work with spastic 
children of Kentucky while he was District 
Governor of the Lions Clubs, George devoted 
his energies fui'ther to service of young 
people by pioneering public recreation in 
Glasgow. To finance this program, he showed 
the nation how thousands of dollars could be 
raised through radio auctions to finance 
service projects of this kind. His auctions, 
now widely copied, have meant much nation- 
ally to organizations dedicated to service. 

Remember the powerhouse football teams 
Coach Raymond Ridley used to turn out in 
the Roaring Twenties at the Scottie School ? 
George Ganter achieved a degree of athletic 
immortality there in Barren County as one 
of the toughest centers of his day. Glasgow- 
ians H. D. Palmore, Sam Sears, and Albert 
Ely will tell you that Ganter and his sidekick, 
Bailey Tolle, were a couple of characters in 
that line. Ganter would say to Tolle, "Do you 
want this tackle or should I crack him?" 
and easy-going Bailey would say, "You take 
him, I'm tired," and George Carr would lay 
another halfback low. 

Now this dedicated public servant adds to 
his past performances, which include initiat- 
ing a Glasgow Recreation Program in 1956, 
gridiron achievements which go back to 
1923, work with unfortunate children, serv- 
ices as International Counselor of Lions In- 
ternational, and his current state-wide ef- 
forts to bring outstanding park facilities to 
Kentucky. When you are down Kentucky 
Lake way, take a look at the new boat dock 
engineered by George which everybody said 
would cost $200,000. "Progressive George" 
showed them how to get it for a song, just 
$3900. Leadership developed on the athletic 
field does carry over into later life ! 

When George Carr Ganter received his 
Cob Pipe in 1953, he wrote the following to 
the Dutchman, "I know I do not deserve it. 
Many others have greater claim, but I shall 
never, never let it get away from me. There 



is so much that needs to be done and so little 
time that I am often appalled at so much in- 
difference." 

With that keynoting quotation, the Fly- 
ing Dutchman makes his final appeal to ath- 
letic leaders over the state to make one reso- 
lution for this New Year, that being to do 
more for those "Game Guys" who want you 
to be interested in them. Right now, let the 
Dutchman know of that physically handi- 
capped youngster who should get state-wide 
recognition in this column for the fighting 
example he is setting for others. That boy 
is entitled to a Lionheart Lapel Button 
Award and becomes eligible for the Game 
Guy Trophy for 1958. 

Here's news! The new basketball rules 
are harder for Kentuckians to assimilate 
this year than ever before. The Dutchman 
had more rulings to hand down in the month 
of December than he had all during last 
season. In spite of this, the National Basket- 
ball Rules Committee of the United States 
and Canada gets an orchid from the Dutch- 
man. In the main, the rules changes have pro- 
duced a better game. 

For the first time in the history of basket- 
ball, this National Basketball Rules Com- 
mittee will meet in Kentucky in 1958. It 
has long been the custom for this group to 
meet at the site of the National Collegiate 
Athletic Association's Basketball Tourna- 
ment finals, which this year will be at Free- 
dom Hall in Louisville. This Rules Commit- 
tee, according to H. V. Porter, will write next 
year's rules on the Sunday following the 
final round of NCAA Tournament play. Still 
another first for Kentucky is the meeting of 
the National Football Rules Committee in 
Lexington in January. 

Kentucky is host to another big event! 
The Physical Education Division of the 
Southern District of Colleges and Univer- 
sities is holding its convention at the Ken- 
tucky Hotel in Louisville, February 25 
through 28. Dr. Sue Hall, Convention Man- 
ager, is quite happy that the convention was 
able to avail itself of the services of Cliff 
Fagan, Associate Executive Secretary of the 
National Federation of State High School 
Athletic Associations. Cliff is a favorite of 
Kentuckians, and it's a cinch he'll be a fav- 
orite all through the south after the South- 
ern District representatives get to meet him 
in Louisvillle. 

Kentuckians will remember President Guy 
W. Nesom, of the Southern District, as one 
of the guests of honor at last year's K.H.S. 
A.A. dinner during KEA. Guy is widely 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1958 



Morganfield— W. K. A. C. Class A Champion 




(l.pfl ((> KiKht) Front Row: Thomas, French, Hulette, Pride. Elliott. Shelton, Greenwell, Bell, 
Antler^nn. Sheffer. Second Row: Head Coach Dawson. McCann. J. Stenarf. Below. G. Gibson. Taylor, 
(o«an, .1. Stewart, T. Gibson, Brown, Coffman, Line Coach Martin. Third Row: B, Stewart, Lovell, 
Hendriwn. Crooks, Strouse, Organ. Luckett. Greenwell. Glazcbrook. Mgr. Brantley, 



known throughout Kentucky and hails from 
Natchitoches, Louisiana. 

Now for a basketball situation which the 
Dutchman thinks you fellows will want clear- 
ed up: 

Play : Jersey has had the number 85. To 
make a legal number without the expense 
of ripping off part of the number, a team 
covers the 8 with white paint. Opponent 
claims the number is still illegal since it is 
distinguishable at close range. 

Ruling: The intent of this rule was to make 
it easy for the official to signal the players' 
numbers. If the 5 is clearly distinguishable 
so that neither the official nor the scorer is 
confused as to which player is meant when 
the official holds up 5 fingers, there is no 
good reason why such a device should not be 
considered legal. 

"Tater" Combs, widely heralded in basket- 
ball officiating circles as a State Tournament 
arbiter, is now stationed in Somerset with 
his insurance business, but "Tater" still 
packs his whistle around with him. A chance 
meeting with this jovial fellow a few days 
ago brought back memories of a night spent 
on a clinic trip in Travis Combs' home in 
Harlan. 

"Tater's" bird dog had just had a half- 
dozen pups and "Tater" had moved them into 
the master bedroom. On the occasion of my 
visit, he was trying to persuade Mrs. "Tater" 
to let them remain until they were adults- 
Only a super-salesman could sell this bill of 
goods, and "Tater" sold it! No better bird 
dogs are found anywhere than those bred 
by this "whistler". 



Bob Hinshaw and L. V. Phillips, of the 
Indiana High School Athletic Association, 
presented to the Dutchman a model of the 
race car which this year won the Indianapolis 
Speedway. This is a fine gesture from In- 
diana's Hoosiers to Kentucky's wandering 
Colonel. The Dutchman picks up a lot of 
mementos on his annual sashays doing 
basketball clinics. Besides the model race car 
from Indiana, he collected a Greensburg 
Country Ham from W. B. Owen ; an armful 
of oranges from Coach Ed Diddle; a travel 
clock from a group of officials ; and one 
character who was operating a still in the 
Kentucky Mountains offered a jug of 
"Moonshine". The Dutchman refused it, 
making Kentucky's Number one sports fan, 
revenooer "Big Six" Henderson, very proud. 

With the New Year of 1958 coming up, 
all officials should alert themselves to the 
promotion of good neighbor sports practices 
by communities by making recommendations 
for the Abou Ben Adhem Awards. Recom- 
mend individuals whom .you think qualify 
for the Corn Cob Pipe of Honor. Drop the 
Old Dutch Boy a letter with your nomination. 

The first Corn Cob Pipe of 1958 goes to 
Laban Jackson, the "Sage of Shelby County." 
"Labe" was recommended to the Dutchman 
by a score of Kentuckians who feel that he 
richly qualifies because of his unselfish serv- 
ice to both young and old people through his 
efforts to bring them the best recreation 
facilities possible. His vision, action, and his 
deep love of service richly qualify Ken- 
tucky's Commissioner of Conservation as the 
Corn Cob Pipe winner for the month of 
January. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1958 



Page Thirteen 



Caldwell County— W. K. A. C. Class AA Champion 




(Left to Rieht) Front Row: Sumner. Kenady, Nance. Curling. D 
Palmer. Second Row: J. Crider. Scott. Lewis. Fears. Fureson, R. Mitchell 
.Johnson. Patterson. Third Row: Lacev. Kelly. Tandy. Blackburn. Mallo 
Watson. Fourth R«w: McChesnev. t hildress. Moore. McConkev. Goodwin. ^ 



;:itt>. ( . (rider. Manus. 
iBEcrs. 1). .Mitchell. Griffith. 
Hunsaker. Murray. Murphy, 
wine. Boren, Mann. Hopper. 



Southern District AAHPER Convention 

A meeting of interest to Kentucky admin- 
istrators, physical education directors, and 
coaches will be the forthcoming Southern 
District Convention of the American Associa- 
tion for Health, Physical Education, and 
Recreation, scheduled to be held in Louis- 
ville on February 25-28, 1958. The committee 
in charge has lined up some outstanding at- 
tractions for the meeting. 

President Guy W. Nesom of the Southern 
District, writing to the State Office of the 
K.H.S.A.A. about the program, says: 

"One session your members would be par- 
ticularly interested in is the one on Men's 
Athletics scheduled for 3:40 p.m. Tuesday 
afternoon, February 25th. Mr. Tom Scott, 
Director of Athletics at Davidson College, is 
chairman of this section program and he has 
been fortunate in securing as speakers three 
outstanding figures in men's athletics Mr. 
Walter Byers of the National Collegiate Ath- 
letic Association ; Mr. Al Duer of the Na- 
tional Association of Intercollegiate Athletics 
and Mr. C. B. Fagan, Associate Executive 
Secretary of the National Federation of 
State High School Athletic Associations will 
discuss Desirable Standards for Athletic 
Practices. 

"On Wednesday night we are featuring a 
number of 'action' programs. Among these 
are the intercollegiate basketball game be- 
tween the University of Louisville and De- 
Paul University at Freedom Hall ; a gymnas- 
tic circus by the Louisville Turners, Inc. at 



the Turners' Gymnasium ; an aquatic demon- 
stration featuring the internationally famous 
Beulah Gundling and others at the Y.M.C.A. 
Pool ; a dance demonstration scheduled for 
the Kentucky Hotel ; and a tour of recreation 
facilities and programs in the City and Coun- 
ty. Those in attendance at the convention 
will be able to make a selection of any of the 
above programs and secure free tickets to 
them. Of course, the number to any one pro- 
gram will be limited to approximately 200 
persons. We feel that this will present no 
problem, however, in that we have so many 
things of intei'est to see. 

At our Opening General Session, scheduled 
for Tuesdav night, we expect to have Gover- 
nor Chandler in attendance along with a num- 
ber of other outstanding leaders. Our main 
speaker for that program will be Dr. Shane 
MacCarthy of Washington, D. C, who is pres- 
ently the Executive Director for the Presi- 
dents Youth Fitness Council." 
PROGRAM DIGEST 
Tuesday. February 25 
Morning-: 

Meeting- of Section Chairmen 

Meeting of Honor Awards Committee 

Meeting of Proceedings Committee 

Registration Opens 

Exhibits Open 

Meeting- of AAHPER State Membership and 
Publication Directors 

Visits to Schools and Community Org-anizations 

Luncheons as scheduled 
,4fternoon: 

Film Showing's 

Therapeutics 



Pag'e Fourteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1958 



Secondary School Physical Education 
N.S.G.W.S. 
Men's Athletics 
Students' Coke Party 

Evening: 

First General Session ; 

Reception 

Kentucky Trot Night 

Wednesday, February 26 

Morning: 

Phi Epsilon Kanpa Breakfast 

Registration (All Day) 

Film Sho'wing-s 

Professional Education 

School Health 

Elementary School Physical Education 

Public Relations 

College Health 

State and District Officers Luncheon 

Afternoon: 

Second General Session (Health Division) 

Film Showings 

Representative Assembly 

Tours 

Buzz Sessions 

Evening (Community Resources Night): 

Recreation Centers Tour of Louisville and Jef- 
ferson County. 

Dance in Recreation, a Demonstration 

Aquatic Demonstration 

Health Club Tour 

Turner's Circus — A Gymnastic Demonstration- 
Exhibition 

Basketball: University of Louisville vs. DePaul 
University 

Round Dancing 

Buzz Sessions 

Quiet Recreation 

Thursday, February 27 

Morning: 

Registration (All Day) 
Film Showings 
Research 
Aquatics 

Industrial Recreation 

Third General Session (Physical Education Div- 
ision) 
Past President's Luncheon 
Old and New Board of Directors' Luncheon 
Dance Section Luncheon and Meeting 

Afternoon: 

Film Showings 

Measurement and Evaluation 

Youth Serving Agencies Recreation 

City, County, and State Directors 

Students 

Institutional Recreation 

Evening: 

Fourth General Session 
All-States Dinner and Fun Night 
Social (Square) Dancing 
Quiet Games 
Buzz Sessions 

Friday, February 28 

Morning: 

Reg'istration 

Film Showings 

Religious Organizations Recreation 

WNORC 



College Men 

Camping and Outdoor Recreation 

Public Recreation 

Safety Section 

Afternoon: 

Fifth General Session (Recreation Division) 
Meeting of all New Section and District Officers 
Meeting of New Board of Directors 



Volleyball Clinic 

A most successful volleyball clinic for girls 
was conducted at Bowling Green, Kentucky, 
on Saturday, December 7, 1957. 

The clinic was held at the Bowling Green 
High School gymnasium with Bowling Green 
and College high schools as co-hosts, and 
was conducted bv Peggy Stanaland and Betty 
Blanton of the U.K. Women's Physical Edu- 
cation Department : and Joan Winkler, teach- 
er of Physical Education, Morton Junior 
High, Lexington. These three did an excel- 
lent and most successful job in presenting the 
skills, team strategy and officiating tech- 
niques of the 1957-59 girls' volleyball game, 
based on rules for the highly skilled player. 

There were approximately 100 partici- 
pants and thirty spectators from the follow- 
ing schools: Bowling Green. College, Warren 
County, Alvaton, Richardsville, Auburn, 
Russellville, Loretta, Greenville, and Hise- 
ville. 

The morning session of the clinic began 
with a demonstration of a volleyball game 
using the official 1957-59 rules for highly 
skilled players. This e-ame was played by the 
girls from Bowlinp- Green and College high 
schools with Miss Stanaland as referee. Miss 
Blanton as umpire and Miss Winkler as 
scorer and timer. A brief question and 
answer period followed the game. 

Immediately following this, all participants 
were divided into five groups. Each group 
was instructed and then practiced the skills 
of volleying, net recovery, serve, spike, and 
block. 

In the afternoon. Miss Blanton, who is the 
Kentucky vollevl-'all chairman for the D.G. 
W.S., worked with a orroup on officiating and 
at the same time Miss Stanaland and Miss 
Winkler worked with another group on team 
strategy. The two groups were then brought 
together, one playing and using some of the 
team tactics thev had iust learned while the 
other group officiated the games. 

Financial assistance from the Kentucky 
Section of the Division of Girls and Womens 
Sports helped to make this clinic possible. 
— Betty Langley. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1958 



Page Fifteen 



Corbin— Southeastern Kentucky Conference Co-Champion 



j^. 



Ml-fe 



(Left to Right) Front Row: R 
Row: Hutson. Barton. White. Tur 
Hart. Henderlight. Hodge. Wilder 
Row: Kelsav. Jernis. Underwood. 



anie>. Bailee. I.anhan 
rentine. Miller. Dalla 
, McFarland. Morton 
M(B'jrne>. Lvnch. 



Chandler. Queary, Alsip, Hodge. Goins. Second 
Hart. Rader. Bird. Smith. Third Row: Duane 
Me>ers. Grant. Bible. Terrill, Boone. Fourth 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List compiled January 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Arnzen, Stanley. 33 Ohio Ave.. Newport. Hi 1-6611. AX 1-6827 
Baker. Charles T.. E.K.S.C. C.P.O. Bo.x 62. Richmond. 270W 
Barrv. Ambrose C. 48A Wherry. Ft. Campbell. GE 9-4043 
Bass. Eddie. E.K.S.C. C.P.O. Box 50. Richmond 
Benjamin. Bernard. 311 E. Main Street. P. O. Box 51. Provid- 
ence. MO 7-2008. MO 7-2101 
Bentley. James. Shelby Gap. 928 or 548 .Tonkins (Bus. No.) 
Berry, William, 1229 Second St., Portsmouth, Oh-o, El 3-6766 
Berryman, Glen, McHenry. 4425, Beaver Dam 2351 
Black, Clarence, West Liberty. SH 3-4264. SH 3-3405 
Blaton. Clayton. Pathtork. MO 4-2039 
Brooks, Anthony, 730 Elm St., Henderson 
Canadv. Ray B.. Court Square. Barbourville. 127 
Carr. Gene P.. 416 20th Street. Ashland. EA 4-8566 
Chaney. .Toscph G.. 510 E. 8th. Russellville. Pa 6-9660. Pa 6-6434 
Collins. Larry H.. 604 E. 20th Street. Covington. Axtel 1-8616, 

Melrose 1-0010 
Coombs. .Tohn. 1329 Center Street. Bowlinsr Green 
Coomer. Charles, Box 476, Somerset. 1322 W, 545 
Cox, William J. "Bill". 528 Tennessee Ave.. Pineville. Edge- 
wood 7-3209. Edgewood 9131 

Bl 1-1650. 



St.. Nashville. Tenn.. BR 7-5610, 



Craig, Randy, 4676 Delhi Rd.. Cincinnati. Ohii 

Ga 1-4460 
Danzy. Theophilus, 2602 Mi 

CH 24311, Ext. 306 or 321 
Daugherty, Bobby L.. Cromwell 
Davis, William E.. 1310 H^gh St.. Ashl 
Davison. Dorald E.. 2620 Wendell 

GL 4-7511. E-t. 2466 
Detenber. Gene H.. 229 Tyne Rd.. Louisville 7. Tw 5-7058. 

Me 4-1780 
Dixie. Cornelius P., 608 So. Clay. Louisville. Ju 7-7680. Em 

6-9561 
Dorsey. James A., 1110 Gilsey Ave.. Cncinnati. Ohio. Gr 1-8050 
Edwards. Owens D.. Water. Elkton, Co 5-2553 
England. Cecil. Route 1. Box 210B. Middlesboro. 938-J 
Estes. Darvin K.. Pi Kan House, Georgetown, 1218 
Fey, Allen, 123 Garden Way, Ft. Thomas. Hi 1-6288. Ki 1-7800 

Ext. 1460 
Gant, W. G.. Jr.. 229 W. Fairview, Oak Ridge Tennessee, 

5-4775, 7503, Ext. .5816 
Goodin. Shirley. Black Star High School. Alva. Ed 72031 

Pineville. Mo 43454. Alva 
Groves. Glendal. Rec. Dent. Western State Hospital. Hopkinsville 
Hampton. Darrel C. c/o Bntler County High School. Morgan- 
town. Logansport. La. 6-3062 Morgantown ( Bus. No. I 
Harvey. Bennie. 925 Center St.. Henderson. Va. 6-3758 
Hatter, Jack, 1654 Amsterdam Rd.. Cov'r)<Tton. Ed 1-2444 
Head. Eugene. Route 2, Philoot. Pa 9-4294 Mm 3-7305 
Hedrick. Pierce, Bldg. 3009 F.. Ft. Campbell, 3266. 3199 
Helton. F,-eddie. P. O. Box 36. Verda 
Hogg. Bill. 815 Bardstown Rd.. Elizabethtown. RO 5-4539, 

RO 5-5237 



Holmes. Mike. Austin Peay State College. Clarksville. Tenn., 

Tu 5-5463 
Hook. W. F.. "Woody", R.F.D. 2. P. O. Box 3, Kevil. 2-6941 

Hobart 
Hooks. Floyd. 800 E. 20th Street, Owensboro. MU 4-4146 
Hoskins. Paul B.. P. O. Box 378. Morehead State College. More- 
head 
Hubbard. Ronald E., 635 Moulton Place. Portsmouth. Ohio, 

El 3-4993 
Huiet, Fred "Whitev", 7327 Osceola Dr.. Maderia 43, Ohio, 

Lo 1-9239, Ch 1-4768 
Jefferson. Charles R.. Perry. Elkton. 5-2285 

Jobe, Robert Porter. 242 Market. Lexington. 2-1596 or 4-6627 
Johnson. Roger. 637 Mt. View Ave.. Pineville. Ed 7-2882 
Jones, Cornelius, Tenn. A & I State Univ.. Nashville. Tenn.. 

Br. 7-3004R. Ch 24311-224 
Jones. Jan Aiden. 305 East 47th. Covington. AX 1-1340 
Jorgenson. Donald G.. Co. D.. 327 Inf.. Ft. Campbell. 3703. 2975 
Kastner, Alfred T.. 5797 Kennedy Ave.. Cincinnati 13, Ohio. 

El 1-2426, P & G Co., Ivory Dale 
Kersey, Jerry. P. O. Box 1365. Alva. Mo 4-2007 
King. Bob, 119 So. 39th, Louisville, Sp 8-4660 
Krahwinkle, Hugh, Jr., 420 Maple Ave.. Owensboro. Mu 30810, 

Mu 36965 
Kurry. Thomas G.. Co. D 14BN 5th Regt.. Ft. Knox. 2225 



No.l 
B.. 



College, 



Lexington, 3-3814, 



Route 2, Waltersville, c/o I. C. Williams 
Lee. William A.. Wallins Creek 
Levicki, A. P.. 340 Oak. Norton. Va., 666, 654 
Lewis, Milus G.. Loyall 
Littral. James W.. 460 Locust Ave.. Lexington. 3-0354, 3-3335 

No. 1 Station 
Lon.i;o, Richard. McAllister Auditoriun 

Lexington 
Lowe. Eugene T.. 107 Ford St.. Londo 
Lucas. Don P.. Lot No. 39. Post Trai: 

205S. 2803 
McAnelly. David F.. Liberty. 4371. 29 
McCord. Anthony. 1636 Courtney A 

4-4195 

McFall. Gene Gordon. Nancv 

McMillin. Larry L.. University Station. Box 1403, Lexington 
Medaris. Oliver J.. Apt. 12 C Wherry. Ft. Campbell, Ge 9-3219 

2954 
Merritt. Bob Lee. 212 Exeter, Middlesboro, 2640 
Miles, John W., 7601 U.S. 42. Florence. Di 1-7650 (Bus. No.) 
Miller. Bill c/o Campbellsville Jr. College, Campbells- 

ville, 470 J. 355 
Miller. Ferrel. Cadiz. 639 
Mills. Ray. Manchester 
Murphy. Charles L.. Liberty 

Nev/kirk. William B., 4663 So. 6th Street. Louisville. Em 6-6082 
Nielsen. Stanley, 215 Sorth Alder. Toppenish, Washington 
O'Leary, Charlie. 3462 Whitfield Ave.. Cincinnati 20. Ohio. 

PI 1-5455. Pa 1-7340 
Olson. Leland D.. 326 Med. Co.. Ft. Campbell. 2884 
O'Nan. Norman. Route 3. Henderson. 7-9912. 7-3466 
Osborne. James C. Star .lit.. Box 330, Harlan, 472-J (Bus.No.) 
Page, William D.. Pikeville College. Pikeville. 9102 
Parker. Billie E.. P. O. Box 731, Pineville. Edgewood 7-3293 
Peay. Curtis B., Route 6. Bowling Green. VI 3-8171 
Perkins. William, 108 E. Thomas. Lexington 
Perry. Willie Earl. 502 N. 1st Street. Murray, 2083 



Page Sixteen 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR JANUARY, 1958 



Petty. Ernest C, R. F. D. 2. Pembroke. Tu 5-8836, Tu 5-8836 

Poynter. ,Ioe D.. 417 W. 9th, Newport. Ju 1-7521 

Preece, Boyce C. Box 544. Kermit. W. Va. 

Purdy. George D., R. F. D. 2, Bradsfordsville 

RawJings, Charles, 526 Diecks Dr., Elizabethtown, Ro 5-9929, 

Ro 6-6237 
Rentz, Thomas W., 335 Transylvania Park. Lexington. 4-1091, 

3-2880 
Reeves. Kenneth, Pineville. Ed 7-2050 
Riddle. George William. Route 1. Maceo. Ensor, 5482 
Ritter. Donald, Box 33, Waddy, 739 (Bus. No.) 
Robards, .lohn H.. Jr., 833 Clay. Henderson. Va. 6-3156 
Roberts. Elza. Jr.. 1325 Cruiser St., Louisville 5, Glendale 

2-1640, Ju 4-1341. Ext. 230 
Robinson. Pearl. Box 87. Manchester. 2266 

Roby, .Toseph L.. 1259 College. Bowling Green, VI 3-6569, VI 3-8326 
Rogers, Tom, 3639 Woodbine, Cincinnati, Ohio, Hu 1-9703, 

Pa 1-3720 
Ross, Clifford H.. 1817 Brardau Ave.. Knoxville. Tenn., 5-5740. 

2-2030 
Schellhase, David. 1630 Wedeking, Evansville, Ha 5-9790 
Scott, Luther, 211 Spruce, Murray, 1665 
Shedden, Eckols L.. Apt. 115-F. Wherry. Ft. Campbell. Ge 

7-3848. 2223 
Skinner. Earnest. 2 "6 Pine Street. Murray. 1923 
Skinner. Robert Stevenson. 120 Spruce Street. Murray 
Slaughter. Alton H.. R. F. D, 2, Elkton, Br 7-3844 
Smithson, Richard, 1546 State St.. Bowling Green 
Snowden. Ken. 829 N. Ft. Thomas. Ft. Thomas. Hi 1-6992 
South, William F., 180 Versailles Rd., Frankfort, Cap 7-6565, 

Cap 3-3447 
Sewards, Clement B.. Julius Ave.. Pikeville, 734-W 
Sowards, Leonard, 156 N. Hanover. Lexington. 3-1709 
Spaulding. Stan. 335 Arlington Ave., Waverly, Ohio, 519-M, rA 
Stickrod, Daniel, 61 Rivard Dr., Ft. Wright. Ed 1-1788 
Strader, Wesley, 250 East 14th, Bowling Green, Vi 3-6686 
Tackett, Paris C, Dorton 

Taylor, James. 425 Robertson, Lexington, 2-8562 
Thlrman. Robert. 2124 Eastview. Louisville. Gl 8-6187 
Trimer, Norman E., 9th Ord Co. (R&C) Ft. Knox, 5346 or 

6640 (Bus. No.) 
Turner, A. J.. Langley. 3202 Martin. 3241 
Vanhoose. Edgar N.. c/o Vanhoose Lumber Co., West Prestons- 

burg. 4281 (Bus. No.) 
Vanhoose. Jimmy L., 617 Stafford St., Paintsville, 9501 

(Bus. No.) 
Watts. Shirley. 654 Headley. Lexington, 4-8852, 2-5494 
Weaver, Ray M., College Hts. P. O. Box 246. Bowling Green. 

Vi 3-9103 
Webb, .lack L.. Lindseyville. Ly 7-2367 
Weber. Walter. 338 Anderson Ferry Rd., Delhi Hills 38, 

Ohio, Bl 1-0161 
Whitham, Challenger, 3028 C, Govt. Quarters. Ft. Campbell, 

4538, 3309 

CONFERENCE STANDINGS 

(Continued from Inside Front Cover) 
Southeastern Kentucky Conference 

Corbin 7 30.0 

Harlan 7 3O.0 

Middlesboro 6 2 20.0 

Williamsburg 5 2 18.6 

Pineville 3 5 13.7 

Knox Central 2 6 12.5 

Bell County 2 6 12.5 

Lynn Camp 1 5 1 12.1 

Barbourville 6 1 10.7 

Western Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Madisonville 9 10 24.50 

Caldwell County 10 1 23.50 

Owensboro Catholic 5 10 22.50 

Hopkinsville 7 10 21.87 

Franklin-Simpson 5 2 21.43 

Owensboro 5 2 21.07 

Fulton 2 20.00 

Russellville 7 3 18.33 

Daviess County 5 4 18.33 

Sturg-is ' 5 4 1 17.77 

Morganfield 5 5 16.00 

Henderson 5 4 15.55 

Trigg County 3-6 13.33 

Murray 3 6 13.33 

Mayfield 1 4 12.00 

Henderson County 2 3 12.00 

Providence 2 7 11.11 

Bowling Green 9 10.00 

Crittenden County 9 10.00 



Barren River Six-Man Conference 

Ends: Mills, Austin Tracy; Goodhue, Caverna; 
Parrish, Hiseville; Tobin, Caverna; Strader, Hise- 
ville. 

Centers: Thompson, Park City; Driver, Temple 
Hill; Walters, Caverna. 

Backs: Lyons, Caverna; Brown, Hiseville; Cox, 
Austin Tracy; Frazier, Caverna; Long, Hiseville; 
Cox, Hiseville; Perkins, Temple Hill. 

Cumberland Valley Conference 

Ends: Hodges, Benham; Melzoni, Evarts; Johnson, 
Black Star; Day, Loyall. 

Tackles: Howard, Evarts; Goforth, Loyall. 

Guards: Burkhart, Loyall; Stapleton, Hall; Trent, 
Benham. 

Center: Evans, Lynch. 

Backs: Smith, Loyall; Howard, Black Star; Hill, 
Benham; Miller, Loyall; Ray, Leslie County. 

Eastern Kentucky Mountain Conference 

Ends: Smith, Belfry; Dann, Jenkins. 
Tackles: Stidham, Hazard; Hensley, Paintsville. 
Guards: Asbury, Jenkins; Dixon, Prestonsburg. 
Center: Thomas, Fleming. 

Backs: Hughes, Prestonsburg-; Hill, Fleming; Har- 
rison, Jenkins; Sizemore, Hazard. 

Mid-Kentucky Conference 

Ends: Nottingham, Elizabethtown; Haydon, St. 
Joseph Prep. 

Tackles: Robinson, Bardstown; Moraja, St. Joseph 
Prep. 

Guards: Dowling, Springfield; Coyle, Elizabeth- 
town. 

Center: Colvin, Bardstown. 

Backs: Ransdell, Elizabethtown; Simpson, Leb- 
anon; Best, Elizabethtown; Hammond, Bardstown; 
Carrico, St. Joseph Prep; Thomas, Old Kentucky 
Home. 

Northeastern Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Offensive Team: Sloan, Strait and Lee of Cat- 
lettsburg-; Stephens, Greenslait and Davidson of 
Raceland; McKenzie and Caudill of Russell; Smith, 
McKell; Conley, Wurtland; Maynard, Louisa. 

Defensive Team: Johnson, Braham and Benard of 
Catlettsburg; Sallee, Fuller and Mills of Raceland; 
Spolarich and Gallion of Russell; Salisbury, McKell; 
Adkins, Wurtland; Dotson, Louisa. 

Northern Kentucky Athletic Conference 

Ends: Feldhaus, Boone County; Martin, High- 
lands; Heckman, Dixie Heights; McAfee, Highlands. 

Tackles: Fenneseth, Highlands; Points, Newport, 
Jones, Bellevue; Allen, Dixie Heights. 

Guards: Hanson, Bellevue; Lear, Holmes; Huff, 
Dixie Heights; Sparks, Dayton. 

Centers: Goode, Boone County; Logsdon, Holmes. 

Backs: Cochi-an, Highlands; Noelker, Boone Coun- 
ty; Crawford, Highlands; Larsen, Holmes; Parton, 
Dixie Heights; Ward, Dixie Heights; Straub, High- 
lands; Denham, Boone County. 

Southeastern Kentucky Conference 

Ends: Phipps, Knox Central; Hutson, Corbin. 

Tackles: Haley, Pineville; Williams, Corbin; Ra- 
der, Corbin. 

Guards: Chandler, Corbin; Patrick, Williamsburg. 

Center: Gross, Harlan. 

Backs: Lanham, Corbin; Queary, Corbin; Byrd, 
Wiliamsburg; Day, Middlesboro; Massengill, Mid- 
dlesboro. 



K. H. S. A. A. TOURNAMENT DIRECTORS 

District and Regional Tournament Directors can get all of their supplies 
and needs to run a tournament from Hunt's. We have the merchandise 
listed below in stock for immediate shipment. Call or write us your needs. 

BASKETBALLS 

Get the feel of a basketball same as will be used in the State Tournament in 
Lexington, in your District or Regional Tournament. We have the following : 

No. AFR panel lock molded ball endorsed by Coach Adolph Rupp 
and used by the University of Kentucky Basketball Team. 
No. XI OL Last Bilt ball made by MacGregor. 
Both of these balls will definitely be used in the State Tournament 
in Lexington. 

ADMISSION TICKETS 

Complete stock of admission tickets, 2,000 tickets to the roll, printed with 
established admission prices and numbered consecutively. Also PASS OUT 
tickets, ADMIT ONE tickets, all in different colors. $1.25 per roll of 2,000. 

TROPHIES AND AWARDS 

We can take care of your Sportsmanship trophies, individual charms for 
All-Star teams, All-Tournament teams, etc. Our stock is complete and we 
can engrave and ship to you at once. 

ACCESSORIES 

Nets, scorebooks, first-aid supplies, whistles, stopwatches, timers' horns, 
powdered resin, bath towels, shoe laces, colored top sweat socks, carry-all 
bags. All of this merchandise in stock for at once delivery. 

BANKS AND GOALS 

We have a complete stock of fan-shaped steel, fan-shaped wood, and rect- 
angular glass backboards complete with goals and nets in stock for at once 
delivery. A phone call will get them off to you at once. 

FAIR-PLAY ELECTRIC BASKETBALL SCOREBOARDS 

We have IN STOCK the Tick-A-Way FF-IS Fair-Play and the dial type 
DeLuxe FD-60 Fair-Play in our warehouse ready for immediate shipment. 
A call will get them to your gymnasium^ before tournament time. 

Turn all of your needs over to us. We will be glad to handle them for you. 
Our stock is complete. 



Hunt's Athletic Goods Co. 

Phone 103 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

THE LARGEST EXCLUSIVE ATHLETIC HOUSE IN THE SOUTH 





YgUT yLIFFE^ 



Will Again Supply 
Trophies For Regional 
and District Winners 





REGIONAL TROPHIES 



DISTRICT TROPHIES 



Su+cliffe will supply the KHSAA Regional and District Trophies for 1958. In February 1958, Sutcliffe 
will send two KHSAA Trophies to each Region and District — for presentation to the victors. 



INDIVIDUAL TROPHIES 

You will jilce Suteliffe's in- 
dividual awards for sports- 
manship — foul shooting — Sec- 
ond Team awards — and charm 
balls for individual players. 
Our salesman will feel it a 
privilege to show them to you. 
Order now. 




OFFICIAL TOURNAMENT 
BALL 

The Rawlings RSS Official Basket- 
ball is the choice of most Kentucky 
High School teams . . . and it will 
be used in most of the Regional 
and District tournaments . . . and 
at the State Tournament at U. of K. 
Coliseum, Lexington. Of course, 
you may buy this recognized 
Basketball at Suteliffe's. 




UTCLIFFE CO.! 

LO UISVILLE 1. KENTUCKY °' 




High khool Afh/efe 

National Meeting Was Held In Lexington 





I , 



The National Alliance Football CommittHc nnl fhv IXoiiitive Officers of the 
National Federation states met in Lexington on January 6-8, 1958. In the picture 
above, reading- left to right, are: Reed K. Swenson, President, National Junior College 
Athletic Association; A. O. Duer, Executive Secretary, N.A.I.A.; H. V. Porter, Executive 
Secretary, National Federation of State H.S.A.A.; and C. B. Fagan, Associate Secre- 
tary, National Federation. 



Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 
FEBRUARY - 1958 



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The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL XX— NO. 7 



FEBRUARY, 1958 



$1.00 Per Year 



National Federation Meeting 

The National Alliance Football Committee and 
the executive officers of the National Federation of 
State Hig-h School Athletic Associations met at the 
Phoenix Hotel, Lexington, Kentucky, during the 
period of January 6-8, 1958. The K.H.S.A.A. was 
represented by Athletic Director Edgar McNabb of 
the Beechwood High School and Thomas P. Bell of 
Lexington, football clinic directors; and Prin. Joe 
Ohr of the Irvine High School, Secretary of the 
Kentucky Coaches Charity Association. 

The session for executive officers was attended 
by Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford and Assistant 
Commissioner J. B. Mansfield. Also present at sev- 
eral sessions for both groups were members of the 
K.H.S.A.A. Board of Control. More than 100 dele- 
gates were present at the two meetings. 

National Federation President Homer Williams, 
in the first football committee session, held on 
January 6, welcomed representatives of the National 
Junior College Athletic Association and the Nation- 
al Association of Intercollegiate Athletics. Brief 
reports from standing committee chairmen were 
made as follows: EQUIPMENT, Lyle Quinn (Iowa); 
GAME ADMINISTRATION AND MANUAL, J. C. 
Harper (Alabama); RESEARCH, S. D. Jackson 
(Tennessee); SAFETY, Kermit Anderson (Minne- 
sota); STATISTICAL, Webb Porter (Tennessee); 
INJURY DATA, W. M. Runyon, (O.S.F.S.). The 
afternoon session was devoted to a discussion of the 
football questionnaire and editorial topics. 

The visitors were guests of the K.H.S.A.A. at a 
r^inner meeting, held at the Student Union Building, 
University of Kentucky, at 6:00. Dr. Robert R. 
Martin, State Superintendent of Public Instruction, 
was the speaker for the occasion. He discussed the 
relationship of a well organized sports program to 
general education. Following the dinner, the group 
adjourned to Memorial Coliseum, to see two basket- 
ball games which had been scheduled in honor of the 
visitors. In the opening game Frankfort defeated 
Lafayette by a score of 52-48. Daviess County was 
winner over Russell County in the second game by 
a score of 79-61. 

The two rules sessions on Thursday were in- 
volved with Authorization of Rules Revisions, Ex- 
perimentation for 1958, Safety Program, Citations, 
and a discussion of the 1959 meeting. 

The sessions for executive officers were held 
on Tuesday evening, January 7, and Wednesday 
morning. Presiding at the sessions were Commis- 
sioner L. V. Phillips of Indiana and Commissioner 
Sanfoi'd of Kentucliy. Topics for discussion were as 
follows: Federation Recommended By-Laws, Olympic 
and All-American Activities, The Mutual Legal Aid 
Pact, Basketball Reaction and Preferences, Progress 
Reports, Uses of Available Material, The 1958 Base- 
ball Program, National Alliance Developments, Ath- 
letic Injury Conferences, and Expansion of Track 
and Field. 

Mr. H. V. Porter, Executive Secretary of the 



National Federation, has summarized the more im- 
portant rule modifications which received the ap- 
proval of the Football Commitee. Mr. Porter's 
summary follows: 

CHECK-UP ON 1957 CODE: Approximately 
20,000 Football Questionnaires were distributed. 
Distribution was through machinery set up by each 
of the participating organizations. Approximately 
6400 were returned and tabulated. Separate sum- 
maries were made for each of the participating 
groups. The proportionate vote in one group dif- 
fered very little from the corresponding vote in 
each of the other groups. This was true for the 
check-up on last season's rules as well as for sug- 
gested revisions for the season of 1958. 

A check-up of Part I of the Questionnaire re- 
vealed overwhelming approval of the revisions which 
were authorized for and used during the 1957 season. 
Coaches, officials and game administrators ex- 
pressed approval of the rule which prohibits trans- 
verse sleeve stripes below the elbow and the right 
of a team to use any officially-approved type of ball 
when the ball is put in play by that team. There 
was a 92V, approval of the rule which permits one 
player to talk to one coach at a sideline during a 
legal time-out charg'ed to either team. 

The slightly greater restriction on movement of 
guards and tackles after taking a set position on 
the line was approved by a 2 to 1 vote. On this item, 
there was a larger dissenting vote than for other 
items. Comments revealed that most of the opposi- 
tion was because of details of administration rather 
than opposition to the principle of discouraging 
deceptive movements intended to cause the oppon- 
ent to commit a foul. 

The rule which prohibits any player from 
grasping' an opponent's face protector, even though 
he may be the runner, received almost unanimous 
approval. 

Part II of the Questionnaire leveals problems 
are still created by: (a) illegal coaching at times 
other than those when coaching is permissible; (b) 
failure of the ends to be in proper position on the 
line of scrimmage; (c) an official blovnng his 
whistle at the wrong time, i.e., when he is not 
thoroughly familiar with the acts which cause the 
b''Il to become dead immediately; and (d) use of the 
e'bow or hands not in contact with the body in block- 
ing activities. 

ABOUT PROPOSALS FOR 1958: Questionnaire 
returns showed a heavy majority in favor of con- 
tinuance of the right of one player to talk to one 
coach at the sideline during a legal charged time- 
out. About 1/10 of those who voted on the matter 
would expand the rule to permit several players 
and several coaches to participate in the sideline 
conference. 

The rule concerning restriction on interior 
linemen of A received a heavy supporting vote but 
a healthy minority favors no additional restrictions 

(Continued on Page Ten) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1958 



FEBRUARY, 1958 VOL. XX— NO. 7 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington. 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1956-60), Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1957-61), Marion 

Directors— W. B. Jones (1957-61) Somerset: W. H. Crowdus 
(1954-58), Franklin; Jack Dawson (1954-58), LouisviUe ; 
Robert P. Forsythe (1955-591, Greenville; K. G. Gillaspie 
(1955-59), Georgetown: Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



ice 



jErom the Commissioned s Cjffi 

1958 District Tournament Sites 

(1) Fulton, (2) Paducah Tilghman, (3) 
Wingo, (4) Murray Training, (5) CaMwell 
County, (6) Madisonville, (7) Hopkinsville, 
(8) Todd County, (9) Providence, (10) Hen- 
derson, (11) Bremen, (12) Owensboro, (13) 
Lewisport, (14) Canieyville, (15) Beaver 
Dam, (16) Muhlenberg Central, (17) Bowl- 
ing Green, (18) Russellville, (19) Park City, 
(20) Metcalfe County, (21) Adair County, 
(22) Caverna, (23) Elizabethtown, (24) Old 
Kentucky Home, (25) duPont Manual, (26) 
'Fern Creek, (29) Shepherdsville, (30) Shel- 
byville, (31) Oldham County, (32) Owen 
County, (33) Boone County, (34) Covington 
Catholic, (35) Newport Catholic, (36) High- 
lands, (37) Harrison County, (38) Bracken 
County, (39) Maysville, (40) Paris, (41) 
Frankfort, (42) Versailles, (43) University, 
(44) Madison Central, (45) Junction City, 
(46) Brodhead, (47) Somerset, (48) Hazel 
Green, (49) Clay Countv, (50) Corbin, (51) 
Bell County, (52) Benham, (53) Jenkins, 
(54) Hazard, (55) Carr Creek, (56) Lee 
County, (57) Elkhorn City, (58) Betsy 
Layne, (59) Flat Gap, (60) Morgan County, 
(61) Montgomery County, (62) Breckinridge 
Training, (63) Olive Hill, (64) Fairview. 

1958 Regional Tournament Sites 

(1) Murray State College, (2) Hopkins- 
ville High School, (3) Henderson High 
School, (4) Central City High School. (5) 
Bowling Green High School, (6) Campbells- 
ville High School, (7) Louisville, (8) Owen 
County High School, (9) Boone County High 
School, (10) Harrison County High School, 
(11) University High School, (12) Somerset 
High School, (13) Bell County High School, 
(14) Hazard High School, (15) Prestonsburg 
High School, (16) Morehead State College. 



Correction 

The names of two basketball coaches were 
omitted inadvertently from the list of 
coaches which appeared in the January issue 
of the ATHLETE. Robert J. Cover is coach 
at the Richardsville High School, District 17, 
Region 5 ; and Wilms Kief er is coach at the 
J. M. Atherton High School, District 25, 
Region 7. 

News About Swimming 

The 1958 State High School Swimming 
Meet for Class A will be held in Lexington on 
Saturday, February 22, at the University of 
Kentucky pool. This is the earliest date on 
which the Class A meet has been held, and 
it is in line with the wishes of the school men 
involved. The meet for Classes B and C will 
be held at the same location on Saturday, 
April 12. This date is a week later than the 
one originally planned and announced on the 
K.H.S.A.A. calendar. 

Class A schools will include those high 
schools with an enrollment of 750 or more 
(grades 9-12), Class B will include those 
schools with an enrollment between 300 and 
750, and Class C will be schools with an en- 
rollment of less than 300. Any school may 
enter a class above its classification, and any 
school entering a team in the meet for the 
first time may enter the class below its classi- 
fication. 

Class A will have eleven events this year, 
two more than the number in 1957. The new 
events are the 400 Yard Freestyle and the 
100 Yard Butterfly. Class A swimmers may 
compete in only two events this year, includ- 
ing Fancy Diving. This is in line with the 
1958 interscholastic rules. The Class A 
events this year are as follows : 400 Yard 
Freestyle, 50 Yard Freestyle, 100 Yard But- 
terfly, 200 Yard Freestyle, 100 Yard Back- 
stroke, 100 Yard Freestyle, 100 Yard Breast- 
stroke, Fancy Diving, 150 Yard Individual 
Medley (butterfly, back, front crawl), 200 
Yard Medley Relay, and 200 Yard Freestyle 
Relay. 

The method of entering teams in the meet 
will be the same as in past years, with the 
State Office supplying entry blanks to the 
schools whose principals have indicated that 
they will enter teams in the meet. The Asso- 
ciation will make the same allowance to 
participants for transportation, lodging, and 
meals, as is given State Track Meet parti- 
cipants in each event. Expenses for the 
swimming coach will be paid if the school 
has as many as four entries in the State 
Meet. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1958 



Page Three 



By-Law 21 

School administrators and coaches should 
check their schedules carefully and see to it 
that their teams are not playing more than 
the number of basketball games allowed 
under the provisions of K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 
21. In only one county, conference, or in- 
vitational tournament may the games played 
by a team representing a member school 
count as only one game. If a team plays in 
more than one of these tournaments, the one 
in which the most games are played may be 
counted as the one game mentioned in the 
By-Law. 

"Certified" Officials 

Since the list of "certified" officials ap- 
peared in the January issue of the magazine, 
five additional officials have qualified for 
the "certified" rating. They are: Bill Baird, 
Tom Cubbage, Cleophus Pursiful, William 
Varble, Milford Wells. 

National Intramural Association 

Ellis J. Mendelsohn, Director of Intramural 
Activities at the University of Louisville, 
announces the forthcoming conference of the 
National Intramural Association, scheduled 
to be held at the Seelbach Hotel, Louisville, 
on March 20-21, 1958. Mr. John Heffernan 
of Brown University, Providence, Rhode 
Island, is President of the Association. Mr. 
Mendelsohn is Executive Secretary of the 
organization, and convention manasrer. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List compiled February 1) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed, it is 
the home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two 
numbers are given, the first number is that of the home phone. 

Able, Forest E., 4616 So. 2nd Street, Louisville, Em 6-6077 

Ashby, Carl C, Box 356, Elkton, Co 5-2262 

Ball, Denver, Raceland High School. Raceland, Ashland 4-0531, 

Russell 1140 
Beiersdorfer, Jim, 6517 Surrey Ave., Cincinnati, Ohio, HU 

1-7194, HU 1-7194 
Blackburn, Adrian, Scott Court, Prestonsburg, 2401 
Bowlin, Don, P. O. Box 104, Emlyn, 5058 
Bush, Everett, Lothair Station, Hazard, Oak 208 
Cain, Malcolm, 1509 Brigman Ave., Jeffersonville, Ind., BU 

2-9703, BU 3-6611, Ext. 306 
Cropper, William C, Route 2, Mayslick, SO 32602 
Curry, Amos R., Delbarton, W. Va. 
Deskins, Tilden, Elkhorn City 
Dodge, Bruce Baker, 106 Esplanade, Louisville, EM 3-2804, 

EM 3-9606 
Duerson, William Robert, Box 480, Lancaster, 401, 9110 
Duff, Birchell, Garrett 

Edwards, Eugene, Route 2, Tell Citv, Ind. 
Elder, Robert James, 332% 3rd, Morehead, 3 
Ferguson, Ford, Western High School, Latham, Ohio 
Gillespie, Robert C, Box 982, Pikeville, 1418, 1114 
Goetz, Larry C. 6786 LeConte, Cincinnati, Ohio, BE 19281, 

RI 22959 
Greer, Tom, 1259 College, Bowling Green, VI 3-6569 
Hale, John, 472 Poplar Street, Harlan, 244 (Bus. No.) 
Harper, Charles, Beechmont, OR 6-2264 
Harper, Robie, Beechmont, GR 6-2264 
Hill, Earl Foyster, Route 1, Box 12, Rockhold 
Hyde, Paul D., 1301 North 11th St.. Paducah, 3-5686 
Jackson, Carl R., P. O. Box 150, Harlan, 778, 2600 
Jones, Edward B. Ill, H&S Co., 2nd Tng Regt, USATCA Ft. 

Knox, 5433, 6622 



Kereiakes, Spero, 515 Nutwood, Bowling Green, VI 3-6498, 

VI 2-5575 
Kitchen, Leslie, 1701 Lindy Lane, Lexington, 3-0396, 5-1575 
Kleinschmidt, Richard J., 3830 Burwood Ave., Norwood 12, O. 
McCallister, Delbert, Delbarton, W. Va. 
Oakley, Carl Edwin, 401 Padgett St., Corbin, 2566, 465 
Pate, N. Roy, Route 6, Paducah, 5-6803 
Phillippe, Janis M., Kings Mountain 
Preston, Wodrow, Route 2, Box 37, Pikeville, 1163-J 
Price, James E.. Star Route, Liberty, 2581 
Prior, Lowell F., 1722 Highland Ave., Portsmouth, Ohio, 

EL 3-0700 
Riley, Don D., 805 E. Park, P. O. Box 369, Lynch, VI 8-2462, 

VI 8-5486 
Rubenstein, Sherwin, 113 West 6th Ave., Williamson, W. Va. 
Schultz, Paul F., 2212 Mabert Rd., Portsmouth, Ohio, EL 4-2082 
Shirley, Michael D., Route 2, Box 480, Fairdale, EM 6-3078 
stone, Clifton, 2930 Oak Hill Hd., Evansville, Ind., GR 6-0973, 

HA 5-3311 
Strickland, Lloyd, 3303 Powell, Louisville, EM 6-2005, GL 47511, 

Ext. 705 
Thompson, Arthur Lee, Scott Ave., Pikeville, 1738, 9120 
Thurman, George Cowan, West Somerset, Somerset, 8062 W • 
Tibbs, Heyward M., Transylvania College, Lexington 
Vinson, Ray T.. P. O. Box 78, McRoberts 
Welch, Frank T., Sidney 

Wieburg, Glenn E., 7983-C Binter St., Ft. Knox, 5091, 583S 
Willey, Harold, Marshall College, Huntington, W. Va. 
Wilson, Burnell Zeke, 2020 Heatherway, Lexington, 72976 



Wils 



Turkey Creek 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association met at the K.H.S.A.A. 
Building, Lexington, on Sunday evening, January 5, 
1958. The meeting was called to order by President 
Russell Williamson at 8:00, with Vice-President 
Louis Litchfield, Directors W. H. Crowdus, W. B. 
Jones, K. G. Gillespie, Jack Dawson, and Cecil A. 
Thornton; Commissioner Theo. A. Sanford and As- 
sistant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield present. 

Jack Dawson moved, seconded by Louis Litch- 
field, that the reading of the minutes of the October 
5th meeting be waived, since the members of the 
Board had received copies of these minutes. The 
motion was carried unanimously. 

Chairman W. B. Jones of the Trophy Commit- 
tee reported that the low bid of the Sutcliffe Com- 
pany of $27.95 and $32.80 respectively for district 
and regional basketball tournament trophies had 
been accepted by his committee, the only other bid- 
der being Hunt whose figures were $30.95 and 
and $34.95. W. H. Crowdus moved, seconded by Cecil 
A. Thornton, that the action of the Trophy Commit- 
tee be approved. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. 

Chairman W. H. Crowdus of the Football 
Championship Committee asked the permission of 
the Board for sending out a questionnaire to schools 
currently playing' football concerning their wishes 
relative to a possible official football championship 
being declared. Several items to be mentioned in the 
questionnaire were discussed by the Board members. 
K. G. Gillespie moved, seconded by Louis Litchfield, 
that the Commissioner be authorized to send out 
the questionnaire prepared and recommended by the 
Football Championship Committee. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported that the 1958 
K.H.S.A.A. Delegate Assembly and dinner meeting 
would be held on Thursday of K.E.A. week this year. 
He stated that he believed that this earlier date 
would result in better attendance at both meetings. 
He was authorized to secure the services of a speaker 
for the dinner meeting. 

The Commissioner brought to the attention of 
the Board correspondence concerning the Bill Coley 

(Continued on Page Ten) 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1958 



Schools' Ratings of Football Officials for 1957 



NAME 
Allmon, Raymond T. __ 

Almon, James H. 

Alston, E. D. (Rev.) 

Anderson, E. W., Jr. 

Ashworth, Fred G. 

Autore, Daniel 

tach, Leonard 

Baird, Daniel M. 

Ballard, Robert A. | 

Barbour, Morris 

Barlow, Bill 

Barlow, Bob 

Barlow, James L. __ 

Bartels, John 

Baskin, Sylvester __. 

Bell, Clarence T. 

Bell, Thomas P. 

Bennett, Howard __. 

Betz, Dick 

Black, Charles D. _ 

Blanton, Homer 

Boeing, Charles F. _ 

Bond, Jack C. 

Bonner, John C. 

Bostick, Lord M., Jr. 

Bowling, Harry 

Bowman, Earl G.,"Dick"] 

Bowman, George H. ' 

Boyles, Jerry F. | 

Brandenburg, Donald E. j 

Brizendine, Vic 

Broderick, Carroll A._-j 

Brotzge, Maurice J. | 

Brown, George W. 

Brown, John W. 

Burke, Daniel F. 

Byrd, Harry G. 

Caiman, Edwin C, Jr. . 

Campbell, John J. 

Canter, John 

Carlson, David A. 

Carroll, Thomas J. _. 

Cai'ter, DaiTell 

Caruso, J. T. 

Cathey, Gene S. 

Cawood, Hobert Guy _ 

Clagg, Harry G, 

Clark, Charles F. 

Clinard, Fred L. 

Corea, Frank 

Coulter, William 

Cox, William J. "Bill" 

Grace, James 

Craig, Randy 

Creasey, Fred 

Crosthwaite, John S., Jr. 

Crotty, Arnold 

Crouch, Jack J. 

Crum, Edward E. __ 

Gulp, Willard E. 

Cummins, Joshua W. _ 

Current, Ellis R. 

Dallman, James W. 

Davis, Charlie 

Davis, Clyde E. 

DeMuth, Paul E. 

Derrington, Robert 

DiMuzio, Robert M. __ 
Dixie, Cornelius P. 



Excel. 


Good 


7 


8 





7 





3 


8 


9 


1 


2 





1 


2 


2 


6 


5 


3 


8 





3 



1 

5 
4 
2 


7 
13 
8 
5 
2 
2 
5 
1 
13 
6 
7 
2 
2 
4 
10 
5 
6 
5 

13 
3 
2 
5 
9 

6 
11 
5 
10 

4 
1 
3 
8 
1 
4 
9 
1 
2 
14 
28 
1 
1 
5 
4 
3 
1 
1 
■ 9 


9 

1 



9 

9 

8 

3 

7 

3 

3 

8 

5 

4 

5 

5 

6 

3 
11 

5 
10 

1 

6 


11 

6 

9 

9 

6 

2 
1 

8 
5 

2 
9 
8 
9 
12 
1 
1 

9 
6 
6 
7 
6 
1 
3 
6 

11 

7 
4 

11 
4 
3 
1 
4 
6 
1 
5 
1 
3 



Fair 


Poor 








1 











1 











3 





1 


3 


1 


1 


1 





1 





1 





2 





2 


1 


1 





























1 

















1 





1 





1 


1 




















1 


1 














3 





1 


1 








2 





1 











1 





2 











3 























1 























1 





2 


4 








2 





1 


1 








1 








1 
































2 


1 


1 











1 


1 1 


1 





2 





1 





1 












NAME Excel. 

Dolan, Richard Sherl .I 

Doll, Howard B. 1 

Dotson, W. S. 3 

Duke, Jesse W., Jr. __| 3 

Durkin, Jack H. | 12 

Edelen, Ben R. | 8 

Eilspermann, George --I 7 

Elovitz, Carl | 8 

Ernst, Ray C. | 4 

Ewing, C. M., "Hop" __| 4 

Falls, William M. | 2 

Faust, John F. 2 

Fey, Allen 4 

Figg, Charles R. 2 

Fisher, William B., Jr.| 

Fitch, F. A. I 2 

Fitchko, Bill [ 27 

Fletcher, John L. 4 

Florence, Robert H. __ 8 

Forbes, John W., Jr. 4 

Foreman, Earl V. 

Forysthe, Robert | 8 

Fortney, Robert Lee __| 3 

Foster, Berryman 3 

Freese, Oliver T. 5 

Freihaut, Herman | 4 

Funkhouser, Roy A.__ 6 

Gammon, William 11 

Gettler, John F. 6 

Giles, Jonathan W. | 

Gish, Delmas | 4 

Godbey, Edsel T. | 5 

Goebel, Bill, Jr. 

Golden, Billy Joe 1 

Goodwin, W. H. 1 

Gorham, Robert J. 6 

Grace, Charles K. 16 

Grace, Hickory E., Jr.__, 5 

Grady, Clarence 

Greenslait, James W 

Grieco, Joseph R. 1 

Gruneisen, Sam 3 

Hadden, Newell P., Jr. 12 

Haffey, Stan 2 

Hagan, Joseph E. 9 

Hagerman, Bart 3 

Hagy, Harold J. 1 

Hale, Don C. 1 

Hale, H. Ed 4 

Hall, Frank P. 11 

Hanes, Edward C. 6 

Harris, Gene 7 

Harrod, Robert 1 

Hartley, William E. — 2 

Hatfield, Gene Edwin __ 2 

Hawkins, Ralph B. .__ 

Hawkins, Robert W. __ 9 

Heinold, Jack 3 

Heinze, Frank 1 

Heinze, John G. 1 

Hellard. George D., Jr. 5 

Hewling-, Richard A. __j 10 

Hoferer, Louis R. | 4 

Hofstetter, Carl I 

Hofstetter, Joe 1 

Holbrook, William 1 1 

Holeman, D. Fletcher J 15 

Holman, S. T. I 2 

Howerton, Jack, Jr. [ 10 



Good 


Fair 


2 





8 


5 


3 


2 


12 


1 


14 





5 


1 



9 

11 

4 

2 

5 

6 

6 

1 

4 



5 

7 

10 

3 



7 

6 

7 

6 

5 

5 

8 

10 

1 



2 

8 

4 

3 

9 

10 

4 

1 

6 

2 

4 

16 

2 

8 

13 



4 

3 

5 

5 

4 

4 



3 

1 

5 

10 

12 

3 

2 

4 

1 

2 

3 

2 

3 

3 

2 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1958 



Page Five 



NAME Excel. 

Isaac, John K. 1 1 

Janning, Robert L. | 9 

Jarboe, Clem E. j 3 

Jenkins, Kean I 2 

Jetei-, John B. | 3 

Johnson, Beinard j 13 

Johnson, James M. 1 

Jones, James Carl | 

Kathman, Bernie | 1 

Kemper, Russ | 5 

Kimble, Frank 1 1 

King, Allen J. | 4 

Kraesig, Charles F. | 3 

Kraesig, Ray | 2 

Kyle, Leslie G., Jr. __| 3 

Lancaster, Morris B. j 4 

Lawson, Carl E. \ 22 

Lawson, Leland j 1 

Lee, Charles J. | 

Lenahan, Thomas F j 2 

Levicki, A. P. | 5 

Longenecker, David M. j 9 

Lohr, Joel D. | 

Lucas, Gene T. j 7 

Ludwlg, Harry F. j 

McClaskey, Booker ___] 3 
McCollum, Robert G.-.j 4 

McCowan, Connell j 11 

McHenry, Louis P. | 3 

McKown, C. H. I 1 

McQuilling, Gerald __-l 1 

McTigue, Joe [ 5 

Makepeace, William H. i 7 
Malcolm, Donald C. - — j 3 

Manning, Louis I 2 

Martin, Bill j 2 

Marushi, Rudy I 2 

Matarazzo, Salvatore M.| 

May, E. B., Jr. 7 

Mayhew, Happy 1 2 

Mayhugh, Robert Lee.j 2 
Mayo, Henry L., Jr. --1 

Meeks, Jack I 3 

Mercke, Frank 4 

Millerhaus, Bill 

Mitchell, Emmett 5 

Mitchell, Vyron W. 7 

Moellering, Louis H. | 3 

Monroe, Robert W. i 

Moran, W. C. | 3 

Mordica, William A. _-| 9 

Moss, Howard A. | 11 

3 

2 



4 

16 

14 

17 



6 

5 

11 

10 

10 

2 

7 

3 



1 

15 

12 



Moss, James W. 

Mudd, Ed I 

Mullins, B. E. | 

Muntan, Peter J. j 

Mussman, Ralph, Jr. __ 
Nau, Bill 

Neal, Gene 

Neverstich, Johnny 

Nimmo, Lo 

Noland, Douglas 

Nord, Ed 

Omer, Billy W. 

O'Nan, Norman 

O'Neal, Bud 

Osborne, Ted G. 

Overby, H. E. 

Page, Forrest 

Palmer, Carl A. 

Parker, Billie E. 

Parsley, Clyde E. 



Good 


Fair 





1 


8 


2 1 


10 


1 


12 


3 1 


10 


2 1 


4 


2 1 


1 


1 


1 


1 1 


6 


1 


2 


1 


7 





14 


1 


5 


2 1 


13 


1 


9 


1 1 


9 


4 1 


10 


2 


11 


1 


3 


1 1 


5 


1 


5 


2 1 


11 


1 


2 





4 





1 





6 


1 


7 


1 


11 


4 


8 











1 


1 


3 





5 





1 


1 


1 


1 


12 





2 


1 


2 


1 


13 


1 1 


7 


1 


4 


2 1 


5 


2 


9 


1 


4 


1 


1 





9 


4 


5 


1 


1 





1 





2 


1 


6 





6 





5 


2 


4 





7 


2 


6 


1 


4 





9 


1 


4 


1 


1 


1 


2 





9 


1 


13 


1 


8 





3 





4 


1 


8 


3 


4 


1 


2 











4 


1 


9 






Poor 


1 


1 

2 







1 










1 
1 




2 

1 
1 








2 






1 

2 









1 



2 









1 



1 





2 




Excel. 



NAME 

Patrick, Charles C. ] 

Pearce, H. L. j 

Pence, William M. j 

Perdue, Paul j 

Perkins, Billy j 

Perry, A. L. j 

Perry, L. J. | 

Pinson, Eugene | 

Poore, William E. 1 

Potter, Sam j 

Powell, Logan G. | 

Radjunas, Stan E. | 

Ratterman, B. W., Jr.__| 

Ray, Shirley G. 

Reddington, James 1 

Reed, Gordon | 

Reinhart, Gene 1 

Rentz, Thomas W. 1 

Riddle, Maurice j 

Riggs, William T. | 

Robertson, Everett L. | 

Rocke, James M. j 

Rogers, Harry K. j 

Rogers, J. B. | 

Rolph, Harold J. 1 

Rudolph, Fred, Jr. j 

Russell, Charles B. | 

Russell, Joe j 12 

Sabato, Al i 5 

Sacra, Gresham j 4 

St. Charles, Thomas A.| 3 

Sauter, Harold S. I 12 

Saylor, Ben | 22 

Scharfenberger, Irvin T.j 2 

Schellhase, David 

Schlich, Paul E. | 

Schmitt, K. F. 1 

Schultz, Edward "Jake"| 

Schutz, John J., Jr | 

Schuhmann, Joseph R._i 

Scott, Bill I 

Scott, Luther | 

Scullen, Allan R. j 

Selvy, Curt 

Shaw, John H. ] 

Shaw, Stanley E. 1 

Sheets, James W. j 

Showalter, John j 

Shumate, Roy V. | 

Simmss, Wavelan J., Jr. 
Sinclair, George H. __1 

Skinner, Earnest 

Sledd, T. I 

Sloan, Earl Dean j 

Sloan, Wallace ) 

Smith, Edgar J. 

Smith, Walter K. I 

Snider, Louis G. I 

Sparks, Hari-y M. 

Stephenson, Burkitt H. 
Stephenson, Harry S. -_ 

Stevens, Paul B. 

Stevens, William Darrell 

Stone, Clifton 

Sullivan, Don C. 

Teague, Amos 

Thompson, Jack S. 

Thompson, Jack 

Thompson, Paul 

Thompson, Ralph 

Thurman, J. W. 

Treas, Joe W. 



Good 


Fair 


4 





4 





4 





11 


1 


3 


1 


1 





6 





1 





7 


1 





0' 1 


11 


1 1 


1 


1 





1 





1 1 





1 i 


7 


1 1 


6 


2 


6 





10 


3 1 


4 


3 1 


1 


1 1 


6 


2 











1 





1 


2 


2 1 


4 


1 


7 


1 


4 


1 


6 


1 1 


7 


1 1 


6 


2 


7 


1 


2 





4 


1 


7 


1 1 


9 


1 


1 


1 1 


2 


4 1 


4 


1 


1 





2 


1 1 


6 


2 1 


11 


1 


12 


i 


4 


1 


8 





7 





5 


1 


1 





6 


1 


3 





6 


1 


7 





6 


2 


5 





6 





4 


4 


3 





5 





3 


1 


6 


1 


8 


1 


2 





11 


4 


6 





6 


1 


6 





3 





6 


1 


5 


1 


10 






Poor 


2 
2 






1 






1 
1 




1 





2 









1 
1 



1 
1 




1 

1 






1 








1 






1 






1 
1 






1 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1958 



NAME Excel. 

Ti-outman, Doyle C. _-| 1 

Tucker, William R. ___| 4 

Vance, Wendell 

Van Meter, David G. _-| 

Van Meter, John W., Jr.[ 6 

Vankirk, Alvia S. I 2 

Varner, Ray G. | 7 

Vennari, Paul | 1 

Vinson, William Jarrel j 

Waldrop, Douglas | 2 

Walker, Paul R. I 2 

Walter, Lafayette | 6 

Wanchic, Nicholas [ 7 

Wash, Johnnie 4 

Watson, John T. 

Watts, Shirley | 1 

Welch, Bill | 3 

Welch, Tom | 3 



Good 


Fair 


Poor 


1 








5 


6 





5 


1 





4 








6 


2 





5 


2 





10 





2 














1 





5 








6 


4 





5 








12 


1 





6 


1 





1 








4 


2 


2 


3 


1 


2 


6 


4 


1 



NAME 

Wells, Milford 

Werkowitz, Jack 

Whedbee, Melville F. 
Whipple, Lloyde G. _. 
Wigg'inton, AL, Sr. _. 
Williams, Bert O. _. 
Williams, Felix, Jr. _ 
Williams, James H. _ 
Williams, Reid V. ._ 

Williams, Roy E. 

Wilson, Jack R. 

Wilson, John Pope 

Winfrey, Shelby 

Witt, Fred 

Womack, William H. 

Wurtz, Emil H. 

Zimmerman, William 



Excel. 


Good 


Fair 





3 


3 


2 





1 


1 


2 





6 


1 


1 


8 


6 





2 


9 


2 





1 








1 





3 


10 





2 


8 


2 


8 


3 





1 4 


6 


2 


3 





1 1 





1 





6 


7 


2 


2 


4 


1 





1 


2 



Poor 

1 






1 




1 











Films 



The films listed below are in the Film Library 
of the University of Kentucky Department of 
Extension. The Code letters "e,j,s,c,a" refer to 
elementary, junior high, senior high, college and 
adult audiences who may enjoy the particular film 
listed. The rental prices shown do not apply to 
schools which use one of the special subscription 
service plans, offered by the Bureau of Audio-Visual 
Material. 

Basketball 
BALL HANDLING IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c, 1 reel, 
$1.50 
Teaches fundamentals of basketball handling in- 
cluding stance, grip, control, adjustment before 
shooting, catching the ball, and other points. Pre- 
sents game shots, using special photographic tech- 
niques to illustrate principles. 

BASKETBALL BY RUPP, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $2.50 

Animated play diagrams, slow motion photog- 
raphy, and action shots are combined in this new 
film prepared under the personal direction of Mr. 
Rupp especially for coaching- use. Among the drills 
and plays covered in this film are: pivot man's slide 
into the basket; Play No. 6, the famous Kentucky 
Basket Maker; legal screening; penetrating zone 
defense; and the Kentucky fast break. 

BASKETBALL FUNDAMENTALS— INDIVIDUAL 
TECHNIQUES, j-s-c-a, IV2 reels, $2.50 
Branch McCracken, Indiana University basketball 
coach, uses his team to demonstrate the fundamen- 
tals of basketball. Slow-motion photography is 
used to break the various court techniques down 
into easily grasped essentials. 

BASKETBALL KENTUCKY STYLE, j-s-c-a, 2 
reels, .$2.50 (in state), $5.00 (out of state) 
This is the revised edition of the film "Basketball 
By Rupp" prepared under the personal direction of 
Mr. Rupp especially for coaching use. 

BASKETBALL STRATEGY FOR GIRLS, j-s-c-a, 1 
reel, $1.50 
The basic strategy of offense play (fakes, rolls, 
cutting, screening, varying pace) and defense play 
(player to player, basic zone, shifting zone, triangle, 
and diagonal) is demonstrated and explained in this 
film. 



BASKETBALL TECHNIQUES FOR GIRLS, i-s-c-a, 
1 reel, $1.50 

Basic movement skills (running, starting, stop- 
ping, turning) passing (finger control, movement 
with the pass, leading the receiver, choice of the 
right pass), catching (side pass, high pass), shoot- 
ing (finger control, arm extension, wrist flip, choice 
of the right shot), dribbling, faking, and pivoting 
are demonstrated and explained in this film. 

BETTER BASKETBALL, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, $.75 
This film is produced by the Official Sports Film 
Service under the sanction of the National Federa- 
tion of State High School Athletic Associations. It 
demonstrates current rules and good officiating 
procedure, with colorful action by skilled players. 

CHAMPIONSHIP BASKETBALL— TEAM TECH- 
NIQUES, j-s, 1 reel, $1.50 
Man-to-man defense is shown, with the means 
best used under varying conditions. 

DEFENSIVE FOOTWORK IN BASKETBALL, 
j-s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 
Striding with an opponent, checking, maneuvering 
him out of position and other basic skills are illus- 
trated, using- special photography to demonstrate 
points. Rebounding, pivoting, and con-elated arm 
action are taught also. 

EASTERN VS. LAFAYETTE (1957) K.H.S. 
BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT FINALS, e-j-s-c-a, 
3 reels, color, $.75 
The final game of the 1957 K.H.S. State Tourna- 
ment was played in Freedom Hall at the Kentucky 
Fairgrounds and Exposition Center before a record 
crowd of 18,000. The final score was 56-52 as the 
Lafayette Generals won the crown for the fourth 
time. 

KING BASKETBALL, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 

The official rules for the 1953-54 season are in- 
terpreted in this film. In addition, play situations 
are demonstrated by members of the Shawnee Mis- 
sion basketball team, finalists in the Kansas State 
High School Tournament. Particular skills are 
shown by Robin Freeman, jump shot artist, who 
averaged thirty points a game for Hughes High 
School, Cincinnati; Wade Holbrook, a 7 foot % 
inch giant from the Portland, Oregon, State High 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1958 



Page Seven 



School champions; and Chuck Darling, All- Ameri- 
can center from the University of Iowa. 

HAZARD VS. ADAIR COUNTY (1955) K.H.S. 
STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 
FINALS, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, silent, $.75 
This is an excellent film of the g^me in which 
Hazard defeated Adair County by the score of 74-66 
for the championship. Johnny Cox bore the brunt 
of the attack by the champions while all-state play- 
ers, Ralph Shearer and Terry Randall, were best 
for Adair County. The presentation of all awards 
and trophies for the tournament is shown also. 

HIGHLIGHTS OF 1956 STATE BASKETBALL 
TOURNAMENT, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, sound, $.75 
Interesting scenes of events during the tourna- 
ment are shown in this film. Action shots of the 
crowd, cheerleaders, and bands are shown in addi- 
tion to a part of the play in each tournament game. 



MODERN BASKETBALL, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 

This film presents two high school teams playing 
basketball, illustrating the techniques of the game. 
It presents various infractions of the niles and how 
to avoid them. 

NEWPORT VS. INEZ (1954) K.H.S. BASKETBALL 
TOURNAMENT FINALS, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, 
silent, $.75 
This is the final game of the 1954 State Basketball 
Tournament, in which Inez defeated Newport by 
the score of 63-55. The sparkling play of Newport's 
Redmon, and Inez's Cassady and Triplett, is the 
highlight of the film. The three players were select- 
ed as members of the All-State Team. 

PADUCAH TILGHMAN VS. LEXINGTON LA- 
FAYETTE (1953) K.H.S. BASKETBALL 
TOURNAMENT FINALS, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, 
silent, $.75 
This is the final game of the 1953 State Basket- 
ball Tournament in which Lafayette High of Lex- 
ington, Kentucky defeated Paducah Tilghman of 
Paducah, Kentucky, by the score of 84-53. This 
film shows the superior play of two very excellent 
teams. 

RUPP'S FUNDAMENTALS OF BASKETBALL, 
j-s-c-a, 1 reel, silent, $1.25 
Coach Rupp's University of Kentucky Wildcats 
(1949-50) demonstrate ten different plays in such 
a clear manner that it is easy to follow and learn 
each play. 

SHOOTING IN BASKETBALL, j-s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 
Concentrating on the set shot, this film pictures 
the action of the throw, stance, aim, trajectory, and 
fingertip control. Special attention is given total 
body coordination, especially inward rotation of the 
hand and arm making the throw. 



Swimming 

Aquatic Artistry, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

The film presents a diving exhibition by Har- 
old Smith, an Olympic champion. Slow motion 
photography brings out clearly various points in 
Smith's techniques. 



Beginning Swimming, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Through scenes photographed both above and 
beneath the surface of the water, basic techniques 
of swimming for beginners are demonstrated. Land 
and water drils involving kicking, breathing, float- 
ing, paddling, and stroking and pulling with the arm 
are practiced separately, then coordinated as the 
swimmer learns the American crawl. The back float, 
back stroke, and breast stroke are also illustrated 
and explained. 

Breast Stroke, Side Stroke, and Underwater Swim- 
ming, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

This film presents the conventional breast stroke, 
timing the strokes, and the kick. 

Crawl Stroke, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

The basic principles of the stroke are presented 
in this film. The arm stroke, the kick, and the breath- 
ing are demonstrated. This film also includes slow 
motion shots under water. 

Diving Fundamentals, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

After a brief history of the sport of diving, the 
following points are explained and demonstrated: 
The hurdle jump, determining the correct distance, 
proper arm action, correct way of landing on the 
feet, proper takeoff and lift, correct entry into the 
water. The backward dive is also taught, including 
lift, arching the body, and entry into the water. 
The motion is stopped at various points to enable 
detailed study of form. 

Dolphin Kick, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

An excellent swimmer, an underwater camera, 
and carefully devised teaching demonstrations in- 
troduce the new swimming technique known as the 
dolphin or fish-tail kick. Analyzing the body move- 
ments used in the dolphin kick, the film stresses 
the importance of practice for mastery of this ef- 
ficient speedy kick. 

1953 Kentucky High School A. A. Swimming Meet, 
j-s-c-a, 2 reels, silent, $.75 

This film shows the finals of all events in the 
1953 State Swimming Meet. The individual divers 
are included. St. Xavier was the winner in Class A, 
Berea Foundation in Class B, and Newport in Class 
C. 

1955 Kentucky High School A. A. Swimming Meet, 
j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, $.75 

Highlights of the meet and championship heats 
are shown in the film. St. Xavier of Louisville won 
the Class A title for the ninth consecutive year. 
University High of Lexington won the Class B and 
Bellevue the Class C. 

Learn to Swim, e-j-s-a, 2 reels, $.75 

This film outlines the buddy system in learning 
to swim. Steps illustrated are as follows: Breathing, 
floating and gliding, arm stroke, leg stroke, elemen- 
tary swimming, demonstration of stroke combina- 
tion, and adaptation of stroke to individuals. 

Swim and Live, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

Men of the Army Air Forces at Miami are taught 
to swim from floating to swimming through burn- 
ing oil. The film is useful for pre-induction instruc- 
tion and for safety classes as well as for general 
programs. 



i 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1958 



The Flying Dutchman 

The Dutchman wants an unusual column 
for March and he needs Kentucky's coaches 
and officials to cooperate. 

Right now, write the Dutchman, and, if 
you are a coach, tell him all the things you 
like about the officiating you have had this 
year; if you are an official, write him all the 
things you like about the coaches. 

The quotes from coaches and officials 
scattered across the wide expanse of Ken- 
tucky will make interesting and informative 
reading. We don't want the things you didn't 
like. Everybody's heard them over and over, 
and the Dutchman never writes from a nega- 
tive ptandpoint. In our column, we find good 
things to say about people because we want 
our copy to be happy reading. If we can't 
find something good to say, we never say 
anything. 

Occasionally, the Dutchman gets letters 
from scattered points asking why such un- 
deserving individuals qualify for his awards, 
and there is always a stock answer. We aren't 
interested in the things which made him un- 
deserving, we are only interested in the 
qualities which make for greatness of man- 
kind. 

Please cooperate, coaches and officials. 
Right now, write that letter or card to The 
Flying Dutchman, Armory Building, Louis- 
ville 2, Kentucky. You are writing the 
column for March. 

You are a football coach. You have just 
had a tremendous season and you are thrilled 
by the success, and on top of all this, grati- 
tude pours into your already complete life 
in the form of one thousand cash dollars. 
This happened to Elizabethtown's outstand- 
ing football coach. Bill Hogg, and it could not 
have happened to a nicer guy. Elizabeth- 
town gets the Flying Dutchman's salute of 
the month for willingness and ability to 
recognize a job well done. 

While Bill Hogg was banking his $1,000, 
two of Kentucky's outstanding football of- 
ficials boarded an airplane to fly to the Sun 
Bowl Game in El Paso, Texas, where they 
gave the Texans a sample of Kentucky of- 
ficiating. Complimentary remarks from the 
Lone Star State continue to pour into the 
Dutchman's office, praising the outstanding 
work of Dave Longenecker and Jack Hower- 
ton, Jr. Not only did the work of these two 
outstanding arbiters reflect credit on Ken- 
tucky's officiating, but both gentlemen also 



came back with their pockets bulging with 
the "green stuff." 

Official Vic Brizendine scheduled one of 
the country's major basketball teams on his 
officiating itinerary. Vic did an outstanding 
job of whisthng at the world famous Phillips 
Oilers contest with the Indiana AAU Champ- 
ions. Brownstown. The very important games 
which our officials are called on to handle 
reflect the confidence which athletic de- 
partments far and wide place in the Blue- 
grass "whistlers". 

Remember former coach Jim "Pud" Mc- 
Lain, of Magnolia? "Pud" wrote a lot of 
basketball history while he was romping 
across the hardwood at Buffalo winning all 
kinds of honors for himself and his school. 
"Pud" has left the coaching ranks. His rich 
background of fishing and camping exper- 
ience procured for him the directorship of 
that division of recreation in the Recreation 
Program of Jefferson County. 

Many of Kentucky's coaches may soon 
branch out, especially in the summer, into 
fields of recreation. This is a scoop now, but 
by the time you read this column, it may 
well be that this session of Kentucky's Legis- 
lature will have brought recreation service 
to the Commonwealth on a state level. With 
recreation consultant service available to all 
communities in Kentucky, it is a safe prog- 
nostication that many recreation programs 
will shortly be closely allied with athletic 
coaches in Kentucky counties from the Moun- 
tains through the Bluegrass to the Pennyrile. 

It's unfair to have sports without making 
these available to everybody, skilled and un- 
skilled, through the medium of recreation 
and athletic programs. If recreation comes 
to Kentucky on a state level, many new re- 
creational outlets will join those of the sports 
field. There should be an excellent oppor- 
tunity for a good Kentucky recreationist to 
take over a brand new position of State Con- 
sultant of Recreation. 

Now for a melancholy note. Little Nick 
Poppas, "the Rough Diamond from Blue 
Diamond," long a landmark in Kentucky's 
mountains, has left the hill country and is 
now located in Dayton, Ohio. The handsome 
little fellow plans to continue his officiating 
in Ohio. We can say to Ohio that Kentucky's 
loss is its gain. The Dutchman will stack the 
work of Nick Poppas up against the best 
produced anywhere. The best wishes of all 
of Kentucky go with Nick. Hazard will miss 
him. 

From Claude Frady, principal of Hindman, 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1958 



Page Nine 



comes this letter: "On behalf of our student 
body, our faculty and our friends, I wish to 
express sincere appreciation for the Abou 
Ben Adhem Award sent us recently. We feel 
that it is the most significant award that a 
school can receive in sports— to be recognized 
not for winning, but for competing in a 
sportsmanlike manner. We shall always en- 
deavor to merit the award." 

Abou Ben Adham awards do mean some- 
thing to Kentucky's schools, and they can 
only be merited on the recommendation of 
officials, visiting players, fans, coaches or 
school men. Whom do you know deserving of 
this award? 

Here's the first Game Guy of 1957-58 ! To 
Joe T. Kinman, Williamstown's outstanding 
official, goes the credit for taking interest in 
this young man. A Lionheart Lapel Button 
is now adorning the left lapel of Harry L. 
Marsh, of Milford, Kentucky, for his courage 
in overcoming a physical handicap to en- 
gage in basketball. Fourteen years of age, 
Harry stars for Bracken County High in 
spite of a very badly burned leg suffered 
when he was only four years of age. Con- 
gratulations to Harry and thanks to Joe for 
his interest in physically handicapped young- 
sters. Let's keep the nominations for the 
Game Guy of 1958 rolling in. What young- 
ster are you interested in? 

If Coach Pearl Combs of Hindman had not 
already won the Corn Cob Pipe Award, he 
would surely deserve one for all of the com- 
pliments which come in from officials and 
visiting teams. The consensus is that Coach 
Pearl Combs always insists that his boys 
address officials courteously, that his fans 
cheer good plays, no matter which team 
makes them, and he always sees that officials 
are well taken care of between halves with 
soft drinks, plenty of towels and a good 
place to relax. 

Let's close February's column with our 
play of the month: 

PLAY: Team A commits its fourth per- 
sonal foul and the scorer fails to signal the 
officials of this fact. The bonus shot is not 
allowed. Play resumes and time has been in 
when the scorer recognizes his mistake and 
notifies the officials. 

RULING : In our Basketball School at Lex- 
ington in August, we agreed that once time 
had been in, nothing could be done about 
the situation. If time had not been in when 
the mistake was discovered, then a correc- 
tion could be made. 

There is something happening in Kentucky 
all the time! 



Mid-Kentuckv Football Officials 




The Mid-Kentucky Football Officials As- 
sociation held its annual meeting at the 
Officers Club, Fort Knox, on December 11. 
Officers for the coming year were elected. 
Association members in the picture above 
are, reading from left to right: Jenkins (Sec- 
retary-Treasurer), Wilhams, O'Mahoney, 
McClaskey, Matarazzo (President), Pence, 
Fletcher (Vice-President), Goldsmith, Scul- 
len. 



K.F.H.S.G.S.A. 
Northern Kentucky News 

The sponsors of Girls' Athletic Associations in 
Northern Kentucky and a student representative 
from each school held two meetings this winter at 
Highlands High School in Fort Thomas, Kentucky. 
The purpose of these meetings was to schedule inter- 
club basketball games. The following schools were 
represented at these meetings and will participate: 
Bellevue, Boone County, Campbell County, Newport, 
Ludlow, and Highlands. These g'ames are played 
after school with varsity and reserve teams partici- 
pating. The expense of the officials is shared by 
the two schools playing a game. Officials are ob- 
tained from the University of Cincinnati. 

The school representatives in this area attend 
sports clinics conducted by the University of Cin- 
cinnati Physical Education Department and the 
Officials Rating Board of Southern Ohio. Each 
year clinics are usually held in field hockey, volley- 
ball, basketball, and swamming. 

On March 4, 1958, all of the G.A.A. varsity and 
reserve basketball teams in this area will meet at 
Highlands High School to give awards to the varsity 
and reserve team winning the most games during 
the season. Also, this will give the girls a chance 
for fellowship with each other and promote better 
understanding between the schools. Each club makes 
a small contribution to pay for the awards. 

Loyce Meadows, Sponsor G.A.A. 
Highlands High School 

Fort Thomas, Kentucky 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1958 



BOARD MINUTES 

(Continued from Page Three) 
case. He had declared Coley ineligible for athletic 
competition at the Bowling Green High School for 
a period of thirty-six weeks under the provisions of 
the Residence Rule. After a discussion of the case, 
Louis Litchfield moved, seconded by Jack Dawson, 
that the ruling of the Commissioner in the Bill 
Coley case be approved by the Board. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

The Commissioner brought to the attention of 
the Board correspondence concerning the James 
Greg'ory case. He had ruled James Gregory cur- 
rently ineligible for athletic competition at the Cen- 
tertown High School under the provisions of the 
Residence Rule, since the boy's parents were not 
residents of the district and since James had been 
a first team competitor in another school. He recom- 
mended that the boy's eligibility be restored as of 
April 1, 1958, or when the parents should make a 
move to the Centertown district. W. B. Jones moved, 
seconded by W. H. Crowdus, that the recommenda- 
tion of the Commissioner with respect to the James 
Gregory case be approved by the Board. The motion 
was can-ied unanimously. 

Cecil A. Thornton moved, seconded by K. G. 
Gillaspie, that the next meeting of the Board of 
Control be held in Louisville on Saturday, February 
1. The motion was carx-ied unanimously. 

Cecil A. Thornton moved, seconded by W. H. 
Crowdus, that all bills of the Association, beginning 
October 5, 1957, and ending January 4, 1958, be 
allowed. The motion was carried unanimously. 

The Board was then called to order in its 
capacity as Board of Directors of the K.H.S.A.A. 
Protection Fund. 

Secretary-Treasurer Sanford presented a list 
of claims which had been paid by the Protection 
Fund since October 5, 1957, the total amount of 
these claims being $9,398.39. Louis Litchfield moved, 
seconded by K. G. Gillaspie, that the claims as pre- 
sented by the Secretary-Treasurer of the Protection 
Fund be allowed. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. 

There being no further business, the meeting 
adjourned. 



NATIONAL FEDERATION MEETING 

(Continued from Page One) 
or favors prohibiting only the lineman shifting after 
having come to a set position on the line. 

Several items related to possible simplification 
of the I'ules were voted upon in item 11 of the 
Questionnaire. One of these would have permitted 
a place-kick as well as a punt or drop-kick when a 
return-kick is used. About the only purpose in such 
a revision would be removal of the necessity for 
making a separate provision for the return-kick. 
The heavy adverse vote is probably explained by 
the feeling that use of a place-kick on a return- 
kick, if attempted, would increase injury hazards. 
A second item in this group would have prohibited 
an ineligible lineman from advancing beyond the 
neutral zone between the time a forward pass is 
touched beyond the line and the time it is ended or 
is touched by B. The heavy adverse vote may be due 
to a feeling that attractive screen passes might be 
slightly more limited under such revision. Another 
explanation for the opposition could be the feeling 
that since administration of these situations is rath- 
er complicated, any revision, even though it would 
affect only infrequent occurrences, might temporar- 



ily add to the burden of officials. The third proposal 
in this group received a near 50-50 vote. This vote 
had an influence on later action by the Committee. 

The Questionnaire showed a majority vote on 
a proposal to revise the kicking rule so that when 
a scrimmage-kick is first touched by K beyond the 
line, it would immediately become dead. Despite the 
fact that this would be a considerable deviation from 
traditional practice, the item received a 55% favor- 
able vote. The discussions revealed that such a 
change would result in considerable simplification 
through the elimination of complicated situations 
which seldom arise and which must be covered in sup- 
plementary material such as that in the Case Book. 
For various reasons, the Committee did not choose 
to adopt the proposal but recognized the possibilities 
by authorizing serious experimentation with it and 
continued study. 

A proposal to permit the snapper to turn the 
ball with long axis parallel to the line before the 
snap received a heavy minority vote on the Ques- 
tionnaire. The Committee felt that further experi- 
mentation should be made before making such pro- 
posal a part of the rules. 

Another Questionnaire item which received a 
near 50-50 vote was that concerning further re- 
striction of the type of hip and rib pads which may 
be used. The heavy supporting vote indicates a 
desire to take every possible measure in the direc- 
tion of safety. Further conferences with research 
departments of equipment manufacturers was 
authorized with a view to possible action if the 
study should reveal any safety improvements. 

VALUABLE REPORTS were made by Chair- 
man Kermit Anderson of the Safety Committee, by 
Chairman C. B. Fagan of the Football Injury Com- 
mittee, by Chairman J. C. Harper of the Game Ad- 
ministration Committee, by Chaimian Lyle Quinn 
of the Equipment Committee, by Chairman S. D. 
Jackson of the Research Committee, by Chairman 
Webb Porter of the Statistical Committee and by 
Chairman W. M. Runyon of the Football Fatal In- 
jury Committee. 

AUTHORIZED RULES REVISIONS 

Diagram, Page 4: Field and equipment dia- 
grams will show the yardage stakes should be 7 
feet high with an 8-inch disk at the top and the 
down marker should be a stake 6 feet 8 inches high 
with a flip plate 12 inches vertically and 10 inches 
horizontally. Also, each of the coaches boxes will 
be shown as being- 30 yards long, i.e., between the 
35 yardlines instead of the present leng'th of 40 
yards. 

1-4-1; A slight revision will make it clear that 
when a decision, such as whether to accept or de- 
cline a penalty is to be made by a field captain, the 
Referee will not grant a time-out before the choice 
is made. , 

1-4-2: The diagram showing the customary^ 
positions of players and the recommended system 
of numbering- players will be slightly revised so any 
number below 60 will be that of a player who is" 
normally eligible to receive a forward pass. The 
recommended numbers for ends will be 50 to 59 and 
the recommended numbers for centers will be from 
80 to 89. The numbers for tackles and guards vnll 
be interchanged to permit coaches to number posi- 
tions and slots from the center outward, i.e., from 
high to low. 

1-5-3-f: Last sentence will be deleted and the 
word "white" will be omitted in the next to the last 
sentence. This revision is in accoi'dance with pre- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1958 



Page Eleven 



vious' action which stated that, beginning with the 
season of 1958, no transverse stripes on the sleeve 
below the elbow may be used. 

2-9: Definition of "goal line" will be slightly 
expanded to make it clear that when related to a 
live ball in a runner's possession while the ball is 
over out-of-bounds area, the goal line includes the 
extension beyond the sidelines. The purpose of the 
expansion is to provide coverage for an infrequent 
occurrence which, previously, was not covered. It 
involves touchdown situations in which the ball in 
possession of a runner is not "behind" the goal line 
if it is assumed that the goal line ends at the 
sideline. The revision will show that a touchdown 
might be scored without the ball having been in an 
end zone. 

2-15-2: Definition of what constitutes being on 
the scrimniag-e line will show that the player's head 
must be on or not more than 12 inches behind the 
line. Heretofore, it could have been claimed that if 
his head were within 12 inches of the line and in 
front of it, such player would be "on the line." 

2-26: Definition of a snap will be expanded to 
be in harmony with the authorized interpretation 
that there may be an illegal snap as well as a legal 
snap. The revised definition will also give specific 
coverage for the established interpretation that a 
snap ends when the ball touches the ground or a 
player. The new definition will state that the snap 
begins when the snapper first moves the ball other 
than in legal adjustment as in 7-1-3 and that it 
ends when the ball touches the gTOund or any play- 
er. This conforms with the authorized interpreta- 
tion that if the snapper lifts the ball and this is 
followed by a fumble and recovery by B, the penalty 
for the illegal snap may be declined. Corresponding- 
revisions in wording will be made in 7-1-3. 

3-1-1 : Slight revision will be made to indicate 
that for junior college or college games, the 3- 
minute warm-up period before each half is not 
mandatory unless by conference adoption. 

3-4-1: Items e, f and g will be revised and there 
will be a reversal of the order of items e and f. 
In item e, the term "charged" will be omitted since, 
under the authorized revision about compulsoi-y re- 
placement of an injured player, a requested and 
granted time-out which is not a Referee's time-out 
will always be chai'ged. Item g' will be revised to 
specifically list all acts which constitute a Referee's 
time-out including any time-out when the clock is 
stopped for an injured player after his team has 
used its four permissible time-outs. These revisions 
have the effect of classifying all time-outs as being 
either a time-out charged to a team or a time-out 
charged to a Referee and of eliminating the only 
remaining excess time-out. Excessive reouests may 
become a foul for delay of game but there is no 
case where the granting of a time-out request is 
automatically a foul. 

Article 2 will be revised to state that a charged 
time-out occurs when: (a) request by the Captain 
or other authoinzed player is granted; or (b) the 
Referee's stopping of the clock or his delaying of 
the ready-for-play signal is necessary for removal 
of an injured player; or (c) repair of faulty equip- 
ment requires assistance of a team attendant or 
excessive delaying of the ready-for-play signal. 

This harmonizes with the mandatory removal of 
a player for one down in the outlined situations and 
also provides specific coverage for certain cases con- 
nected with repair of equipment. The equipment 
situations were covered last year by interpretation 



but not by rule. 

In Article 3, the first sentence will be retained 
and remainder of the article will be replaced by a 
statement that it is a Referee's time-out if, after the 
permissible four time-outs have been used, a time- 
out is necessitated by an injured player or if the 
Referee erroneously grants a request for a non- 
permissible time-out. 

This conforms with the authorized mandatory 
removal of a player for whom the clock is stopped 
or who, because of injury when the clock is already 
stopped, causes delay of the ready-for-play signal. 
It also provides that if a Referee erroneously grants 
a non-permissible time-out, he assumes responsibil- 
ity for it and resumes play immediately without as- 
sessing penalty. Prior to the time a team has been 
charged with four time-outs in the half, the stopping 
of the clock for an injured player will result in the 
charg-ing of a time-out as well as removal of the 
injured player. 

The plays which follow Article 3 will be revised 
to fit. 

3-4-4: This is a new article which will state that 
an injured player for whom the clock is stopped or 
the ready-for-play signal is delayed shall be replaced 
for at least one down and his team shall be charged 
with a time-out unless the four permissible time- 
outs have been used. 

3-5-1: Item (a) will be revised to state that the 
clock starts with the ready-for-play signal if it was 
stopped for a Referee's time-out. 

This includes all cases of a Referee's time-out 
and all will be listed in 3-4-1-g. 

3-5-3: In second line, "charged" will be sub- 
stituted for "legal" to make it clear that advance 
notice is not necessary for a Referee's time-out. 

3-6-2: Item (b) will be deleted and remaining 
items will be relettered. 

4-3: Expanded Article 1 or a new Article 2 
will indicate spot from which ball is snapped after 
ball becomes dead in that part of the field between 
the side zones. This does not represent any change 
but will provide needed coverage. 

4-3-3: In item (c), "or snap" will be inserted 
after "free-kick" to make it clear that, if a snap fol- 
lows a fair catch, ball may be moved along the 
proper yai'dline. 

5-3-1 : In the play, the letters K and R will re- 
place A and B since this is a kick. 

6-4-3: In the second line, "anywhere between 
the inbounds lines" will be inserted after "free-kick." 

6-4-5: Second line will be slightly revised to 
make it clear that if K legally uses his hands on R 
for warding him off during a block, it is not fair 
catch interference. 

7-1-2: The first four and a fraction lines of 
this article will be modified only enough to make it 
clear that the comments apply to action prior to the 
snap. These lines will be followed by the statement 
that it is also a false start if any player on the line 
between the snapper and the player on the end of 
the line, after having placed a hand on or near the 
ground, then moves his hand or makes any quick 
movement unless the movement is caused by an 
irregularity such as ... . etc. as is. 

The purpose is to prohibit a guard or tackle 
who has assumed a set position on the line from 
shifting to any new position or from jerking the 
head, shoulder or any part of the body in a way 
which simulates action at the snap. The statement 
does not prohibit normal turning of the head to 
watch the ball or the defense or normal adjustments 
to a more comfortable position. If a player inadvert- 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR FEBRUARY, 1958 



ently lines up in advance of the line of scrimmage, 
he is not on the line and is permitted to move back 
to legal position unless it is a false start for other 
reason. However, a player who misses his timing 
and charges too soon, commits a false stai-t. 

7-1-3: This article will be condensed and sim- 
plified to conform with the snap definition as re- 
vised in 2-26. It will state that ths snapper shall not, 
after gripping the ball .... etc. as is: (a) slide his 
hand along- the ball, or move his foot to simulate a 
snap or fail clearly to pause before the snap; or 
(b) lift or move the ball other than in a legal snap 
as outlined in 2-26. 

7-5-2: Item (c) will be expanded by adding "or 
is beyond it because of a charge which drives an 
opponent back from the neutral zone." 

This has the effect of making it an illegal for- 
ward pars with a 5-yavd penaltv when a lineman in 
legal position after having driven an opponent back, 
intentionally touches a forward pass. Heretofore, 
such act was classed as forward pass interference 
with a 15-yard penalty. 

7-5-6: Item a will be revised to fit the revision 
in 7-5-^". The revised statement will make it clear 
that if an ineligible who is legally beyond the neutral 
zone because of driving an opponent back is acciden- 
tally struck by a forward pass, it is not an infrac- 
tion. If the striking is not accidental, it is an illegal 
forward pass rather than pass interference. 

Play (2) will be revised to conform. 

9-1-2: In the eighth line "in flight" will be de- 
leted to cover the situation where a kicker may 
legally use his hands in warding- off a blocker even 
though it might be during a kick in flight. 

P-4-1 : This will be revised to state that no player 
shall participate by touching the ball or hindering 
an opponent after voluntarily having been out-of- 
bounds during the down. The last sentence will be 
omitted and covered in a pla.v situation. 

9-6-1: Item a will be revised to state that one 
pla.ver and one coach may confer during a charged 
time-out on the field in front of the coaches box 
and at a distance not greater than 5 yards from the 
sideline. 

10-5-1 : "Measurement" will be substituted for 
"enforcement" since this applies only when penalty 
is accepted. 

GENERAL: 

1. The state of North Carolina and any other 
interested .^^tate-wide or conference group was 
authorized ti conduct a controlled experiment with 
a provision in which first touching of a kick beyond 
the line by K would cause the ball to become dead 
immediately. The Questionnaire Committee was also 
instructed to repeat this item on next year's ques- 
tionnaire. 

2. A motion to adopt Item 18 on the question- 
naire ■w'hich provides that no measurement shall 
carry the ball more than half the distance to the 
.goal line was tabled. It was then ordered placed on 
next year's questionnaire. 

3. A motion to give the pre-game choice to the 
team which is behind in the score after any scox-e 
has been made was defeated bv a vote of 26 to 4. 
The Committee then ordered the topic placed on 
next year's qustionnaire and suggested that state- 
wide or conference g-roups conduct controlled experi- 
ments to determine reaction. 

4. By a vote of 18 to 15, the Questionnaire Com- 
mittee was instructed to arrange next year's ques- 
tionnaire in such a way that it will be possible to 
determine how various groups, such as coaches, 



officia's or contest managers, vote. 

5. The Committee ordered the next year's ques- 
tionnaire include the proposal that a field goal count 
4 points. 

6. To detei'mine whether there has been any 
.?hift of sentiment, next year's questionnaire will in- 
clude the proposal that the goal posts be placed on 
the goal line. 

7. Additional items which received considerable 
attention and which will affect the material w-hich 
is published in the Case Book or elsewhere included 
the following. Because a player who is injured or 
appears to be injured must now be removed if the 
clock is stopped for his benefit, emphatic instruc- 
tion will caution officials about ordering the clock 
stopped too soon in such cases. The proper proce- 
dure will be for the Official to make a quick ob- 
servation without stopping the clock. After investi- 
.gation, if there is doubt, the clock should be stopped 
and the player replaced. Supplementary material 
will also call attention to the prohibition against 
the pushing of a runner by a teammate. Current 
rule and interpretation permits the runner to push 
either teammate or opponent in his attempt to ad- 
vance but a teammate may not assist the runner 
by pushing him. 

8. For outstanding services performed over a 
period of many years, citation certificates were 
presented to J. C. Hai-per (Alabama), Chairman of 
the Game Administration Committee; A. Oden 
Hawes (Oregon), member of the Football Editorial 
Committee; and Lyle Quinn (Iowa), Chairman of 
the Football Equipment Committee. In recognition 
of the many services of G. Gernon Brown (Louisi- 
ana) in connection with the National Football Com- 
mittee, with adoption of the Code in Louisiana and 
with the making of football films, he was made the 
first life ad-visory member of the National Al- 
liance Football Committee. 

SUPPLEMENTARY ACTION: Arrangements 
were made to produce film strips desirable for use 
by interpreters at rules meetings and by coaches 
in explaining i-ules to their players. The strips will 
be made in both color and black and white and vnW 
have approximately 33 scenes. Continued research 
and study for the improvement of equipment was 
recommended, especially for cleats, face masks and 
kidney protectors. Revised sections of the new foot- 
ball Official's Manual include those covering pre- 
.garne responsibilities, running plays from scrim- 
mage, kick-offs and goal line plays as well as 
others. 



SIX MISTAKES OF MAN 

The Roman philosopher and statesman Cicero, 
said it 2,000 years ago, and it's still true today. The 
"six mistakes of man" are: 

1. The delusion that individual advancement is 
made by crushing- others; 

2. The tendency to worry about things that can- 
not be changed or corrected; 

3. Insisting that a thing is impossible because we 
cannot accomplish it; 

4. Refusing to set aside trivial preferences; 

5. Neglecting development and refinement of the 
mind, and not acquiring- the habit of reading and 
study; 

6. Attempting to compel other persons to believe 
and live as we do. 

— ^From Rotary Bulletin. 



HUNT'S . . . 



IS FOR THOSE IN A HURRY 



For those last minute needs for tournament play and for the last few 
games before tournaments we have our warehouses full and ready to ship. 
So REMEMBER 

"WE SHIP THE DAY YOU BUY" 

FAIR-PLAY SCOREBOARDS 

Tick-A-Way and Dial Types in Stock. 

CONVERSE AND SPALDING BASKETBALL SHOES 

.\11 sizes from 5 thru 17 in Stock. 

BASKETBALLS 

Onr No. AFR endorsed and used by Coach Adolph Rupp and the University 

of Kentucky Wildcats. 

]V[acGrea:or No. XIOL Last Bilt. 

Both of these balls will bs used in the K.H.S.A.A. 19.58 Tournament in 

Lexing'ton. 

We also have the Spalding No. 100 and Spalding- No. PLIO in Stock. 

AWARD SWEATERS AND JACKETS 

We have HUNT'S, O'Shea and Butwin jackets, HUNT'S and O'Shea 
sweaters in stock and ready to load. Speedy lettering service will give 
you excellent shipping time. 

CRAMER AND BIKE WEB 

Training and First-Aid Supplies. 

OFFICIAL'S EQUIPMENT 

We have a complete stock of equipment of all types for the man in the 
white and black stripes. 

GLASS, STEEL AND WOOD RECTANGULAR & FAN SHAPED BANKS 

In stock for immediate delivery. Goals for all types of backboards also 
ready to ship immediately. 

TICKETS 

All denominations of tickets available and in stock. Two thousand to roll 
and five colors available at $1.25 per roll. 

TROPHIES AND AWARDS 

Third place trophies and awards for Most Valuable and All Tournament 
Teams. Speedy delivei y. Satisfaction Guaranteed. 

We only wish that every school in Kentucky could send its team as a pai'tici- 
pant to the 1958 Basketball Tournament. Best of luck to the 16 teams who 
finally make it. 

All of you who will be in Lexington at State Tournament Time come and see 
us. Our display will be, as usual, in Room 463 at the Phoenix Hotel. We 
will be looking for you. 




Hunt's Athletic Goods Co. 

Phone 103 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

THE LARGEST EXCLUSIVE ATHLETIC HOUSE IN THE SOUTH 




WHILE IN LEXINGTON 

FOR THE 

State Basketball Tournament 

Visit Our Sample Rooms 
461 and 462 Phoenix Hotel 



OUR special Sample Rooms at the Phoenix 
Hotel are the happy meeting place and head- 
quarters for players, coaches, fans, celebrities, 
store, school and factory representatives. Make 
it your headquarters, too. 

OUR traveling Kentucky school representa- 
tives. Bob Rels, Harry Blackburn and Chuck 
Shuster will be on hand. As will John Head, Sales 
Manager from our Louisville office. 

See our complete showing of 1958 nationally 
advertised football and basketball equipment, 
honor sweaters and award jackets. 



^Hl IHnEI^I 



/■ 



J^i 



Write For 
Spring Catalog 

If you have not received 
your copy of the new 1958 
Sutcliffe Catalog featuring 
Baseball, Track, Softball, 
Tennis and other athletic 
equipment, advise us at 
once by letter or post card. 




225-227 So. 4th St., Louisville, Ky. 




Hiqh khool Athlete 



LAFAYETTE HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS "A" CHAMPION - - 1958 







(Left to Right) Front Row: Coach HoUinsworth, Allen, Doug Hammonds, Honican, 
Stamatis, Hill, Roberts, Lowry. Second Row: Royalty, Sympson, Egalite, Freeman, 
Dillard, Skiles, Dave Hammonds, Combs, R. Cooke. Third Row: Anderson, Fleming, 
S. Cooke, Langston, Mgr. Stone. 




Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

MARCH - 1958 



J 



Modern Ides of March 



The gym lights gleam Hke a beacon beam 
And a million motors hum 

In a good will flight on a Friday night ; 
For basketball beckons, "Come !" 



A sharp-shooting mite is king tonight. 

The Madness of March is running. 
The winged fleet fly, the ball sails high 

And field goal hunters are gunning. 



The colors clash as silk suits flash 
And race on a shimmering floor. 

Repressions die, and partisans vie 
In a goal acclaiming roar. 



On Championship Trail toward a holy grail, 
All fans are birds of a feather 

It's fiesta night and cares lie light 
When the air is full of leather. 



Since time began, the instincts of man 
Prove cave and current men kin. 

On tournament night the sage and the wight 
Are relative under the skin. 



It's festival time, — sans reason or rhyme 
But with nation-wide appeal. 

In a world of hate, our ship of state 
Rides high on an even keel. 



With war nerves tense, the final defense 
Is the courage, strength and will 

In a million lives where freedom thrives 
And liberty lingers still. 



Let commies clash and empires crash 
'Neath the wreck of a victory arch! 

Let our 1 oys tread where hate is dead, — 
In this happy Madness of March! 

— H. V. Porter. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XX— NO. 8 



MARCH, 1958 



$1.00 Per Year 



Medical Aspects of Fitness 

Editor's note: This address was given by Dr. 
Carroll Witten of Louisville, representing the Ken- 
tucky Medical Association at the Governor's Con- 
ference on Fitness of Kentucky Youth, held in Lex- 
ington on February 20, 1958. 

The medical profession of the state of 
Kentucky is deeply appreciative of the op- 
portunity to have a representative here to- 
day on the "Conference Concerning the Fit- 
ness of our Youth." 

The physicians of this Commonwealth sin- 
cerely welcome the interest shown by the 
Governor of the state of Kentucky concern- 
ing the fitness of American youth and are 
actively interested in cooperating toward 
these goals. The Governor's interest should 
prove a strong impetus to what has long 
been of primary concern to physicians only. 

It seems to us that the Governor very ex- 
cellently stated the purposes of this confer- 
ence in calling for (1) an evaluation of youth 
fitness, (2) a determination of fitness needs 
and goals, and (3) plans for achieving these 
goals. 

In effect, therefore, the Governor has 
called us here today to determine what ac- 
tion can be taken to assure the best "fitness 
of Kentucky youth." 

The medical profession differs sharply 
with some alarmists who believe that our 
youth is "going to the dogs" figuratively 
and literally. The medical profession knows 
that, by every solid and recognizable mea- 
sure, today's youth is healthier than ever 
before ; our youth today is taller and heavier, 
on the average, than of any previous genera- 
tion ; longer years of life are in store for 
today's youth ; chances of living to start 
school are better than 96 in 100 ; and chances 
of living through the school years have 
reached an all time high of better than 99 
in 100. 

To determine the needs and goals of this 
program, one must first have an evaluation 
of youth fitness. This in itself poses a prob- 
lem. The criteria often used in an attempt to 
portray the neglected state of youth fitness 
is the high rejection rate of the armed 



forces, which has been reported as approach- 
ing S5' '( . 

It should be stated incontrovertibly that 
these rejection rates are not a valid index of 
health or fitness. Standards of armed forces 
examinations are arbitrary and varied, are 
based often on the number being examined, 
with many examinees being rejected several 
times on re-examination. Social and educa- 
tional defects also have distorted these 
figures. 

Of course, the health of our youth is not 
perfect. There is always room for improve- 
ment and there is a crying need for a much 
broader application of programs of health 
and fitness for all Americans, and particular- 
ly for our youth. 

Mr. Larry Boeck, a sports writer for the 
Louisville Courier-Journal, very adeauately 
nailed the basic question in last Sunday 
morning's paper when he wrote, "Precisely 
what is physical fitness — the kind President 
Eisenhower wants for our youth? 

"Is it developing the strenorth and stamina 
and acquiring the skills to box 10 rounds, to 
nlay 36 holes of reasonably good golf or 
battle through 5 sets of tennis in mid-July? 

"Or is it something better fulfilled in the 
less competitive athletic fields of mass ex- 
ercises, gymnastics or trudging through the 
woods in a frigid December hunting expedi- 
tion?" 

Too often, it seems, we think only of youth 
fitness as a synonvm of physical prowess. 
As a physician, I feel that youth fitness is an 
interwoven combination of mental, emotional, 
social, spiritual, and physical elements. 

Perhaps nowhere does the "ounce of pre- 
vention adage" apply with ereater meaning 
than in the field of physical fitness. And at 
no time are preventative measures more im- 
portant than in the formative years of child- 
hood, and as such the health of our children 
is the concern of everyone; this includes 
parents, members of the education and med- 
ical professions, and the entire public. 

As such, the efforts toward youth fitness 
must be of a cooperative nature between 
all members of the health team as listed 

(Continued on Page Ten) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1958 



MARCH, 1958 VOL. XX— NO. 8 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication. Lexington. Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexington. 

Kentucky under the act of March 3. 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

Lexington. Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1966-60). Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1967-61), Marion 

Directors— W. B. .Tones (1957-61) Somerset: W. H. Crowdus 
(1964-68). Franklin: Jack Dawson (1954-58), LouisviUe; 
Robert P. Forsvthe (1966-59). Greenville; K. G. Gillaspie 
(1965-59). Georgetown: Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 

^rom ine Commlssionei s Dffice 



ANNUAL MEETING SPEAKER 



Reports Now Due 

1. 1957-58 Basketball Participation List 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Basket- 
ball) 



Spring Meets 

Tentative dates have been set for the var- 
ious spring meets an(3 tournaments in base- 
ball, golf, track, and tennis. They are as fol- 
lows: 

May 5-7, district baseball tournaments 
May 9, regional track meets 
May 12, regional tennis tournaments 
May 16-17, State Track Meet 
May 19-20, State Tennis Tournament 
May 21, regional golf tournaments 
May 22-23, regional baseball tournaments 
. May 27-28, State Golf Tournament 
June 4-5, State Baseball Tournament 

Board Election 

As this issue of the ATHLETE goes to 
press it appears that W. H. Crowdus in Sec- 
tion 3 and Jack Dawson in Section 4 have 
been reelected to membership on the Board 
of Control. Mr. Crowdus was opposed by 
Prin. W. L. Gardner of the Park City High 
School, and a second candidate in Section 4 
was Prin. John M. Potter of the Gallatin 
County High School. Articles concerning the 
reelected directors will appear in the April 
issue of the magazine. 



Protection Fund News 

Three hundred thirty-one member schools 
of the K.H.S.A.A. had insured their athletes 
with the Protection Fund at the time this 
issue of the magazine went to press. Seven 
hundred three claims, totaling $15,673.15 
have been paid since July 1, 1957. 




Lyman V. Ginger 

Dean Lyman V. Ginger of the University 
of Kentucky, currently President of the Na- 
tional Education Association, will be the 
principal speaker at the annual dinner meet- 
ing of the K.H.S.A.A., scheduled to be held 
in the Crystal Ballroom of the Brown Hotel, 
Louisville, at 6 :00 P. M., April 10. 

Dr. Ginger received his A.B. degree from 
Kentucky Wesleyan College and his master's 
and doctoral degrees from the University of 
Kentucky. He taught Science and coached 
athletics at Winchester High School, Win- 
chester, Kentucky, for ten years. For three 
years he was Principal of the Owingsville 
Consolidated School, Owingsville, Kentucky. 
From there he came to University High 
School at Lexington as Principal and Science 
teacher. At the end of the first year, he was 
made Acting Director of University School 
for all twelve grades, and two years later be- 
came Director of University School and 
Chairman of the Division of Listruction in 
the College of Education. From that time 
until 1954. he was Director of Student Teach- 
ing and had charge of the entire student 
teaching program, both elementary and sec- 
ondary, for the Colleo-e of Education. In 
1954 he became Dean of the College of Adult 
and Extension Education. He was made Dean 
of the College of Education in Sentember, 
1956. During the period of 1947-1953 Dr. 
Ginger was President of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association. 

Some of the other experiences Dr. Ginger 
has had include ser\ing as Director of a 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1958 



Page Three 



Workshop at Lock Haven State Teachers 
College, Lock Haven, Pennsylvania. This 
Workshop had to do with laboratory ex- 
periences in the teacher training program. 
He has also directed a Workshop at Sul Ross 
College, Alpine, Texas and one at the Ameri- 
can School Foundation, Mexico City, Mexico. 
In 1954 he served as Director of the National 
Association for Student Teaching Workshop 
at Morehead, Kentucky, and he also served 
as Director of the Kentucky Workshop in 
Economic Education. He has been active in 
Safety Education, Teacher Education and 
Professional Standards, and the Association 
for Student Teaching, and has worked in 
numerous conferences and workshops in 
these areas. 

Dean Ginger served as President of the 
Kentucky Education Association for two 
years, was second Vice President of the Na- 
tional Education Association, and this year 
is serving as President. He is Past President 
of the Lexington Kiwanis Club and has served 
on numerous committees of a civic and social 
nature in and around Lexington. He is past 
President of the Lexington YMCA, an elder 
in the Maxwell Street Presbyterian Church, 
and former Superintendent of the Sunday 
School. 



Youth Fitness Conference 

On February 20, 1958, the Governor's Con- 
ference on Fitness of Kentucky Youth was 
held at the University of Kentucky. In a let- 
ter written on January 24 to representatives 
of education, recreation, athletics, civic and 
religious organizations, fraternal organiza- 
tions, government, and other interested 
groups, Governor Chandler said: "In the past 
two decades we have made great strides in 
most areas of education; however, in the 
course of this progress we may have failed 
to provide adequate fitness programs for 
the youth of our country. It is imperative 
that programs of fitness serving youth be 
improved and promoted to the greatest pos- 
sible extent. President Eisenhower recog- 
nized this problem and appointed a Presi- 
dent's Council on Youth Fitness to promote 
existing national programs, launch addition- 
al ones, and to cooperate, stimulate and im- 
prove the functions of the federal agencies 
with respect to the fitness of youth. 

"We realize that the future of every Ken- 
tucky youth is vital to the future of our 
State ; therefore, I am calling a Conference 
on Youth Fitness .... The purposes of this 
Conference will be to evaluate the present 



status of youth fitness, to determine fitness 
needs and goals, and to propose plans for 
achieving these goals. We are delighted that 
Dr. Shane MacCarthy, Executive Director of 
the President's Council, has accepted our in- 
vitation to deliver the keynote address." 

More than 100 delegates were in attend- 
ance at the meeting. Dr. Robert R. Martin, 
Superintendent of Public Instruction, pre- 
sided at the opening morning session of the 
conference, and President Frank G. Dickey 
of the University of Kentucky gave the wel- 
coming address. Dr. Shane MacCarthy gave 
the principal address, speaking on the sub- 
ject "Educating for Fitness." A "Symposium 
on Fitness" was moderated by Don C. Bale, 
Head, Bureau of Instruction, State Depart- 
ment of Education. Speakers on the panel 
were: Dr. Ernest Jokl, University of Ken- 
tucky ; Dr. Carroll Witten, Kentucky Medical 
Association; Dr. Paul Hunsicker, American 
Association for Health, Physical Education 
and Recreation; and Dr. Ellis Hartford, Col- 
lege of Education, University of Kentucky. 

After a luncheon in the Student Union 
Ballroom, the representatives formed into 
various groups for the purpose of discussing 
numerous topics in connection with youth 
fitness. The groups reassembled at 3:15 P.M. 
for their reports and recommendations. 
Richard Lee Gentry of the State Department 
of Education served as chairman for the 
final session. The recommendations and sug- 
gestions coming out of the meeting will be 
made available by the State Department 
of Education to the organizations repre- 
sented. 



SUPPLEMENTARY LIST OF 
REGISTERED BASKETBALL OFFICIALS 

(List Compiled February 24) 

If one telephone number is given for an official listed it is the 
home phone number unless otherwise designated. If two numbers 
are given, the first number is that of the home number. 

Bright, Thomas, 406 W. College, Mayfield, 1359-W 
Combs, Backer, Vicco, 1836F2 Hazard, 61839 Lexington 
Edwards, Donald A., P. O. Box 87, Sebree, TE 5-7637 
Fields, Ellis, Box 191, Matewan, W. Va. 
Forker, Joe Ralph, 210 Madison, Sebree 

Hayden, Jack, 6608 Estele Ave., Louisville 14, Em 7-8662, 
Hitt, Billy D., 1227 Forest Ave., Maysville, LO 4-6601, LO 4-9132 
Porter, C. A., 1202 Center, Bowling Green, VI 38315 
Samples, Bernard M., Hillcrest Add., P. O, 1 

144-J, 144-J 
Walker, Edward Earle, Kevil 
Wilson, Raymond B., 21 Burnham, P. O. Bo 

IS, Ohioo, JA 1-4277, JA 1-3286 



263, Corbin, 



linnati 



"Certified" Officials 



Since the lists of "certified" officials ap- 
peared in January and February issues of 
the magazine, two additional officials have 
qualified for the "certified" rating. They 
are Glen D. McDowell and C. A. Porter. 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1958 



Films 



The films listed below are in the Film Library of the Depart- 
ment of Extension, University of Kentucky. The rental prices 
shown do not apply to schools which use one of the special 
subscription service plans, offered by the Bureau of Audio- 
Visual Materials. 

Track 

The Broad Jump, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Controlled speed — timing and coordination — de- 
velopment of legs and torso — mobility of pelvis and 
hips, one, two, three style — foot roll — single and 
triple air stride — soft versus hard take off — arm 
position. 

Discus, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Principle of centrifugal force — muscle develop- 
ment for side arm throw — ^grips — finger roll — heel 
of thumb pressure — finger exercises — clockwise 
spin — hip snap — reverse and non-reverse styles. 

Distance Races, s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 

Races from 1,000 to 10,000 metei's and steeplechase 
are demonstrated. Style of distance runner is con- 
trasted with that of dash man. Differences in 
typical physiques are shown. Slow motion photo- 
graphy is used to analyze movements. 

Distances, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Style — developing stamina — calisthenics — avoiding 
shin splint — controlled tension — forward knee reflex 
— straight line running — automatic stride. 

The High Jump, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Belly roll or straddle and improved Western style 
— body lean and reverse — approach — body tension — 
coordination of arm and leg action. 

The Hurdles, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Basic hurdling styles — rear hip and leg action — 
rhythmic running — hurdling calisthenics — body bal- 
ance — correct clearance — circular stepover action — 
adapting styles of physiques. 

The Javelin, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Four stage catapult throw — preliminary run — 
concluding stride — throwing stance — throwing and 
reverse — alternative hand and finger grips — facing 
position — balance of stomach and back muscle ten- 
sion — throwing angle — body and leg cooi-dination 
drills — flexibility exercises. 

Jumps and Pole Vault, s-c, 1 reel, $1.50 

Demonstrations from actual competition are 
shown for running high- jump; running broad- jump; 
hop, step and jump; and pole vault. Slow motion 
photography is used for detailed study of form. 

1954 Kentucky High School A. A. Track Meet, 
j-s-c-a, 2 reels, silent, $.75 

Portions of the state meet are presented in this 
film. Several of the qualifying events are shown 
wath the finals of all the track and field events. 
Lafayette High School won the title with 41 1/3 
points, Ashland was second and Henry Clay third. 

1955 Kentucky High School A. A. Track Meet, 
j-s-c-a, 4 reelsj silent, $.75 

The finals of all the track and field events are 
shown as Ashland High School won the meet with 
26 points. Tilghman High School of Paducah was 
second with 20 1/4 points. New records were set in 



the Mile Run, Mile Relay, and Discus. 

Middle Distances, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Sprinting techniques — ^ball of foot running — auto- 
matic stride — pendulum and bicycle stride — exercise 
— counter balanced arm action — push drive — jockey- 
ing for position. 

Pole Vault, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Basic vaulting principles — importance of exercises 
— running action — grip — selecting the pole — take- 
off — Western and Eastern style — slotting — novice 
training. 

The Relays, j-s-c-a. 1 i^el, $1.50 

Passing — visual pass — blind pass — right and left 
exchange — merging of runners' speed — ^baton grips 
— relay starts, underhand action — cup style — over- 
hand sprint pass — fly scoop — practice and team 
work. 

Shot Put, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Fitting style to physiques — tension contix)l — one, 
two, three rhythm — exercise — finger and hand grip 
— finger and wrist snap — foot positions — progressive 
tension and effort — explosive hip snap. 

The Sprints, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $2.50 

Fundamentals of 100 yard and 200 yard dash — 
impact style and natural stretch stride — synchro- 
nizing- leg and arm action — conditioning exercises — 
starting techniques — slow motion of muscular utili- 
zation and cordination. 

Baseball 

Baseball All-Star Game of 1956, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, 
color, $.75 

The All-Star Game of 1956 was payed in Griffith 
Stadium at Washington. Stars of the American and 
National League are pictured in action during the 
pre-game activities. Highlights of the game are 
shown as the National League wins by a score of 7-3. 

Baseball By The Code, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, $.75 
This picture gives an official interpretation of 
the rules and a demonstration of game administra- 
tion by Umpires from the Major and Minor Leagues. 
Play situations are demonstrated by high school, 
college, and professional players. Correct pitching 
procedure, interference and obstruction, live and dead 
ball, trap plays, infield fly, and strike zone are 
illustrated. 

Batting Fundamentals, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Basic skills which must be mastered before one 
becomes an accomplished hitter. Bat selection, stance, 
grip, stride, swing and follow-through are clearly 
demonstrated in this film by professional players. 

The Batting Stars of Baseball, s-c-a, 3 reels, $1.00 
Who are the big names among batters and what 
makes them good? Watch the featured hitters as 
shown in this film, learn the secrets of their styles 
and forms, and try it yourself. For clubs as well as 
classes. 

Catching in Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

The basic skills in catching baseball are presented 
in this film. How to catch a high rapid ball, a batted 
ball, a throvvm ball, and a ground ball are shovim. 
Stance, footwork, and body balance are described. 
Slow motion and close-up photography are used to 
enable the viewer to follow each step or movement 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1958 



Page Five 



in each of the basic skills. 

Catching Stars of Baseball, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

This is a film designed to assist in the coaching 
of catchers but it is also interesting and entertain- 
ing. Correct methods and techniques of receiving, 
throwing, signalling and fielding are illustrated by 
Bill Dickey, Sherman Lollar, Yogi Berra and Roy 
Campanella. 

Democracy of Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

The purpose of this film is for further develop- 
ment of young baseball players in our modern 
democracy and illustrates this through sports and 
sports competition. This film includes a brief his- 
tory of baseball along with a cavalacade of past and 
present stars. 

Double-Play Kings of Baseball, j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 
This film presents an analysis of the double play 
in baseball. Different players from several major 
leagues are shown in action. Fielding, tagging, and 
throwing are illustrated and explained. 

Hitting in Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Slow motion and close-up photography are used 
to follow accurately and gi-aphically the basic fun- 
damentals of hittmg in baseball. Coordination of 
feet, legs, hips, shoulders, arms, and head is ex- 
plained. How to select a bat, how to hold it, and 
correct batting position are shown. 

Infield Play at 1st and 3rd, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 
The fundamentals and finer points of infield 
play at first and third base are illustrated by big 
league players. Fielding, stance, throwing, tagging 
runners, etc., pictured, often in slow motion. Spon- 
sored by A. G. Spalding Co., The American and Na- 
tional Leagues. 

Inside Baseball, j-s, 3 reels, $1.00 

Fundamentals of baseball, including pitching, 
batting, fielding and base-runnnig, are demonstrated. 

1953 Kentucky High School A. A. Baseball Tourna- 
ment, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, b&w, color, $.75 

This film has some shots from each of the 
games played in the tournament. A large pait of 
the final game, St. Joseph vs. Jenkins, is presented. 
The daytime games were filmed in color. 

1954 Kentucky High School A. A. Baseball Tourna- 
ment, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, b&w, color, $.75 

This film shows the first inning of each game 
played in the tournament at Parkway Field, in 
Louisville, Kentucky. Several innings of the final 
game between Newport Catholic and Louisville Male 
are shown. The pictures of daytime play are in 
color. 

1955 Kentucky High School A. A. Baseball Tourna- 
ment, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, b&w, color, $.75 

duPont Manual defeated Hall High School for the 
championship by a score of 13-3. All the final game 
is shown in color. 

1956 Kentucky High School A. A. Baseball Tourna- 
ment, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, silent, $.75 

Group pictures and action shots of the eight 
teams in the tournament are shown in the film. 
Also included are the first innings of the semi- 
final games and four innings of the final game 
between Newport Catholic and Murray. 



1957 Kentucky High School A. A. Baseball Touma- 
ment, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, silent, color, $.75 

duPont Manual defeated Owensboro High for 
the championship by a score of 8-3. All of the final 
game is shown in color. 

Modern Baseball, j-s-c-a, 3 reels, color, $.75 

This film deals mainly with the rules of the 
game. It presents various infractions of the rules 
and the results of errors made in the game. 

Pitching Stars of Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

Shows four of the leading pitchers in action. Types 
of pitches and methods for practice are portrayed. 

Play Ball, Son, j-s, 1% reels, $2.50 

Joe Cronin introduces this film, showing a group 
of fourteen-year-old boys who are experts in base- 
ball. Correct methods of hitting, catching, and 
throwing are demonstrated in natural and slow 
motion. Based on book by Bert V. Dunne. 

Throwing in Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Slow motion, close-up and stop photography are 
used in presenting the basic fundamentals of throw- 
ing in baseball. Instructions are given for the over- 
head, three-quarter side, side, and underhand 
throws. Coordination of foot and arm motion is 
stressed, as well as coordination of the body as a 
whole. 

Touching All Bases, j-s-a, 3 reels, $1.00 

This film is intended to teach youngsters baseball 
by showing- various American League stars playing 
tneir positions. It is also intended to give fans as a 
whole a better understanding ana knowledge of the 
national pastime. The film shows Father Flanagan 
and his Boys Town Team, the Hall of Fame cere- 
monies in Cooperstown, New York, and scenes from 
night baseball games. 

The Umpire in Baseball, e-j-s-c-a, 2 reels, $.75 

Summarizes importance of the umpii-e to the 
baseball game. Explanation of the duties of umpire 
and also qualifications for job, showing where they 
receive their training. 

Winning Baseball, j-s-a, 3 reels, $.75 

The "cut-off ' play, how the pitcher catches a 
man off base, ana how to call for a catch of a fly 
ball are explained. Art of base coaching is depicted. 
Ways of keeping in condition throughout the season 
ana of caring for equipment are shown. Players of 
the National League show their style of pitching, 
batting and fielaing. Umpires' techniques are demon- 
stratea. The picture concludes with scenes from the 
final game of the 1940 World Series. 

World Series of 1952, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 

The two teams playing were the Brooklyn 
Dodgers of the National League and the New York 
Yankees of the American. The Yankees won the 
championship and were again the world's champions 
after a long and exciting series. 

World Series of 1953, e-j-s-c-a, 4 reels, $.75 

This is the fiftieth anniversary of World Series 
games between the American and the National 
Leagues. The two teams participating were the 
Brooklyn Dodgers of the National League and the 
New York Yankees of the American League. The 

(Continued on Page Ten) 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HiLGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1958 



The Flying Dutchman 

This month is the month for Game Guys. 
The interest being taken by such outstand- 
ing leaders as Jack Thompson, veteran of- 
ficial; Ralph Dorsey, Superintenednt of Ca- 
vema Schools; and Evelyn Rice, Senior 
Sponsor of the Campbellsville High School, 
indicates real interest in young men who are 
courageous. Add the name of Harold S. 
Sauter, and you have another reason why 
young men in Kentucky can feel proud of 
their athletic leadership. 

Jack, Ralph and Evelyn all pointed to 
Dickie Coop, son of Paul Coop, Coach ot 
Campbellsville. They tell the Dutchman that 
when he was 15 months old, he was stricken 
with infantile paralysis. Then he had to wear 
braces and now he has had three major 
operations. All this did not dim his desire to 
participate in athletics. He is now a regular 
on the Campbellsville team with an average 
of ten-plus points per game. "Ole Ben" Ede- 
len offers the information that Dickie is one 
of the finest set shots in high school ball 
today. Evelyn Rice emphasizes that he has 
many accomplishments. He is an expert 
swimmer and an A-student who will be a 
stiff competitor for top honors upon gradua- 
tion. Dickie is a standout and is loved by 
everybody. Certainly here is a fine nomina- 
tion for the Game Guy of 1958. 

Here is another Game Guy, and the most 
unusual one ever to be brought to our at- 
tention. A product of the basketball pro- 
gram of the Louisville Recreation Division 
and coached by Harold S. Sauter, John Stew- 
art, 12-year old Louisville lad, has overcome 
some most unusual handicaps. 

Johnny, who was born with no hands and 
only part of one leg, is an outstanding basket- 
ball player. He has steel peg leg from the 
knee down, but he runs, jumps, shoots and 
dribbles with the best. Bob Kirchdorfer, the 
first athlete ever to win the Game Guy 
Award, watched John Stewart in action and 
reports that if he is not a Game Guy, then 
there never has been one. Other physically 
handicapped youngsters now have two more 
outstanding examples of courage to pattern 
from. We hope many young lives may be 
happier as other unfortunate youngsters 
follow the lead of those who face similar 
misfortune and fight to . overcome physical 
handicaps to enjoy sports fully. 

The Falls Cities Basketball Officials As- 
sociation, presided over by Bill Long, an- 
nually presents an award which is commend- 




Bill Long 

able. To a high school of their area, there is 
presented each year an award for the best 
all-around sportsmanship shown in basket- 
ball during the current season. This group 
gives the award at the annual Falls Cities 
Officials' Banquet, which this year is slated 
for March 31 at the Esquire Club on River 
Road. The award is based on sportsmanship 
exhibited not only by the team, but by the 
coach and school supporters as well. Last 
year, Bridgeport High School, of Frankfort, 
received the sportsmanship award. 

Add another championship to those al- 
ready won by Lafayette's Coach Ralph Car- 
lisle. This championship is conferred on this 
gentleman for the excellent impression which 
his basketball team creates while it is on the 
road. The Lafayette team dined at the Olde 
Fort outside Bowling Green while the Dutch- 
man was also carving a steak in that location. 
So well behaved was this group of boys in 
a fashionable restaurant, that many remarks 
were made around the dining hall that here 
was a group of young gentlemen. Congratula- 
tions to Lafayette's team. May all of our 
athletes remember that the reputations of 
their schools are what they make them and 
ofttimes this is not on the basketball court! 

S. 0. S. for "Shy Low." Dave Longenecker 
had laryngitis at the Louisville Lavitational 
Tournament so badly that he could not talk 
above a whisper. Imagine this catastrophe 
with a tough tournament facing him! For- 
tunately, the Dutchman still had a half tea- 
spoon of "Shy Low" left from his siege dur- 
ing the clinics. After administering it to 
Dave, his throat cleared and he carried on 
in fine fashion. "Shy Low" marches on! 

It looks as though Kentucky may get a 
(Continued on Page Eight) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1958 



Page Seven 



Football Officials Ratings on Sportsmanship of K. H. S* A. A. 
Member Schools — 1957 



(La 



enceburg ) 



Anderson 
Ashland- 

Attierton. (Louisville) 

Attucks (HopkinsviUe) 

Austin Tracy (Lucas) 

LJarbourvilIe 

liardstown 

Bate (Danville) 

Beechwood (S. Ft. Mitchell) _ 

Belfry 

Bell (Pineville) 



Bennam 

Berea 

Biack Star (Alva) 

Boone County (.i? Aorencej 

Howling (jreen 

Burgin 

Buiier (Louisville) 

Caldwell County (Princeton) 

Campbell County (Alexandria) _ 

Caiiipoeiisviile 

Camp jJiCK Kooinsoa (Ijancastet 



CatiettsDurg 

Caverna (ilorse Cave). 
Central ( j_,ouisviUej 



CriLtenden County (Marion). 

Cumberland 

Cynthiana 



lUe- 



Uaviess County (Owensboroj_ 

Dayton 

DeSales (Louisville) 

Dixie Heights (Covington) — 

Douglass (Henderson) 

Douglass (Murray) 

Dubois (Mt. Sterling) 

duPont Manual (Louisville) — 

Durrett (Louisville) 

Kast Benham (Benham) 

Eastern (Middletown) 

Kast Main Street (Lynch) 

Elizabethtown 

Llkhorn (Frankfort) 

Klkhorn Ctiy 



F.varts 

Fern Creek 

Flaget (Louisville) 

Fleming-Meon (Fleming) 

Fort Knox 

Frankfort 

Franklin-Simpson (Franklin) — 

Fulton 

Garth ( Georgetown) 

Glasgow 

Hall (Grays Knob) 

Harlan 

Harrodsburg 

Hazard 

Henderson 

Henderson Co. (Henderson) 

Henry Clay (Lexington) 

Highlands (Ft. Thomas) 

High Street (Bowling Green) — 

Hiseville 

Holmes (Covington) 

Hopkinsville 

Irvine 

Jenkins 

Ky. Mill. Inst. (Lyndon) 

Knox Central (Barbourville)___ 

Lafayette (Lexington) 

Lancaster 

Lebanon 

Leslie County (Hyden) 

Lincoln ( Franklin ) 

Lincoln (Paducah) 

Lincoln (Stanford) 

Lincoln Inst. (Lincoln Ridge) _ 

Lloyd (Erlanger) 

Louisa 

Louisville Country Day 

Loyall 

Ludlow 

Lynn Camp fCorbin) 

McKell (South Shore) 

Madison Model (Richmond) 



3 I 
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Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1958 



SCHOOL 
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THE FLYING DUTCHMAN 

(Continued from Page Six) 
new kind of football. All of us know the 
eleven-man variety and many of us know 
that in the Barren River area, there has long 
been a six-man football conference. Now, 
Bob Hensley, Football Coach of Caverna 
High School, writes that the Barren River 
Football Conference is considering changing 
from six-man to eight-man football and he 
wants information. The information is on its 
way now, Bob. 

Al Gustafson, Jr., calls for the Cob Pipe 
of Honor Award to go this month to Waddy's 
Leonard Thomas. Corn Cob Pipe winner 
Thomas is 61 years old and has been custod- 
ian at the Shelby County School for 35 years. 



Because of his friendly attitude toward of- 
ficials and for his fine hospitality, he is the 
Corn Cob Pipe winner for the month of 
March. There are lots of places that are fol- 
lowing Leonard's practice of serving officials 
cokes at half-time, and remembering to say, 
"You fellows worked a good ball game" after 
the contest is over. 

As the regional winners over Kentucky 
get themselves in readiness for the big show 
of the "Sweet Sixteen" at the annual Ken- 
tucky High School Athletic Association 
Basketball Tournament at Lexington, all of 
us may well be proud that this year has 
brought forth not only some of the best 
basketball, but some of the greatest sports- 
manship Kentucky would ever wish to see. 
Congratulations to the men running school 
boy sports in our Commonwealth. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1958 



Page Nine 



Team Scoring — 1958 Kentucky State High School Swimming- Meet — Class A 



EVENT 


TEAM 




Lafayette Atherton St. Xavier Manual 


400 Yard Freestyle 


9 5 8 


50 Yard Freestyle 


8 4 10 


100 Yard Butterfly 


14 7 1 


200 Yard Freestyle 


8 10 4 


100 Yard Backstroke 


7 7 8 


100 Yard Freestyle 


10 8 4 


100 Yard Breaststroke 


1 9 12 




6 7 9 


150 Yard Individual Medley 


10 5 7 


200 Yard Medley Relay 

200 Yard Freestyle Relay 

Total Points 


10 14 8 6 
10 14 8 6 
93 90 79 12 



K. F. H. S. G. S. A. News 

Fern Creek High School 

Fern Creek School has an enrollment of 
approximately 1600 students, most of whom 
are transported. We have an organized 
G.A.A. with membership of 42. Any girl 
from the seventh through the twelfth grade 
who has a C average and maintains it is 
eligible for membership. 

Our sponsor meets with us at our regular 
business meetings which are held the second 
and fourth Wednesday of each month and 
we do have a constitution. 

We have a point system which works as 
follows: Our secretary has a point sheet 
for each girl, and each member and the 
sports chairman turn the points over to the 
secretary. Each girl receives 50 points for 
coming out for a sport; then if she makes 
the team, an additional 200 points are given. 
Points are also given in a sport for each hour 
of activity, but only 3 points will be given in 
a sport for a day's activity. 

We offer the following awards: School 
letter for those girls who receive 1000 points. 
Only one letter is given. Stripes are given 
for a year's team participation. If a girl 
plays on both basketball and hockey teams, 
only one stripe is given. Stars are given to 
the captains. 

Our G.A.A. is financed through dues of 
50c per new member and $1.00 per old mem- 
ber. An annual faculty-G.A.A. basketball 



game also helps to pay our expenses. 

Each year we have an annual banquet 
which is given in honor of the girls receiv- 
ing awards. 

We have received much enjoyment in 
sponsoring play days which give us an op- 
portunity to meet new girls and exchange 
ideas. 

— Mary Rose Cave, Sponsor. 



Bowling Green High School 

The club for our girls at Bowling Green 
High School is called the Girls Athletic As- 
sociation. We are a co-educational school with 
an enrollment of approximately 425 in our 
senior high. Any girl in the 10th, 11th, or 
12th grade is eligible to join our G.A.A. At 
present we have a membership of 84 girls, 
all non-transported students. 

We have a constitution and our club has 
two meetings each month. In our school we 
have access to the gymnasium twice a week. 
Our intramurals are an outgrowth of our 
G.A.A., and all members participate. 

We finance our club by sponsoring the 
annual homecoming dance, selling sweat- 
shirts, rummage sales and annual dues of 
$1.00. We do not have any problems in financ- 
ing our club. 

We have no point system. One award is 
offered at the close of the school year. This 
is for the outstanding G.A.A. member. The 
entire club membership votes for this award. 



Pasre Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HI'GH SCHOOL ATHLET-E FOR MARCH, 1958 



This past school year at Christmas time 
the girls voted to take each child in the Or- 
phans Home a gift. We plan one project of 
this type each year. 

Since our G.A.A. originated we have more 
than tripled our membership. We realize our 
organization still has some weak points and 
we hope as each year passes we can improve 
by sharing and getting ideas from other clubs 
throughout the state. 

— Robye Anderson, Sponsor. 



FILMS 



(Continued from Page Five) 



Yankees retained the championship by winning the 
first, second, third and sixth game? of the series. 

World Series of 1954, e-j-s-c-a, 3 reels, $.75 

Highlig-hts of the games between the Cleveland 
Indians and the New York Giants are shown in this 
film. The Giants, sparked by the sensational hitting 
of Rhodes, defeated the Indians in four straig-ht 
games. The Indians had set a record for the num- 
ber of games won in winning the American League 
Pennant. 

World Series of 1955, j-s-c-a, 4 reels, $.75 

Exciting moments of the seven games between 
the Brooklyn Dodgers and the New York Yankees 
are shown in this film. The commentary leading up 
to each g'ame makes the film interesting as the 
Dodgers win the world championship. 

Tennis 

Advanced Tennis, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

While working with a tennis pupil. Bill Tilden 
narrates and demonstrates, showing advanced tech- 
niques of tennis. 

Tennis Rhythm, j-s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 

Bobby Rig'gs is shown winning- national tennis 
championship of Forest Hills. Later, at his tennis 
school in Chicago, he demonstrates how to make 
various shots correctly — the grip, service, forehand 
drive, backhand, etc., using regular speed and slow 
motion. 

Golf 

From Tee to Green, e-j-s-c-a, 1 reel, color, $.75 

The camera makes a tour of the Canadian golf 
courses from Newfoundland to Vancouver Island. A 
caddy starts out hitchhiking across Canada and 
stops at courses in each province to earn his way 
on by caddying for awhile. Final scenes are of 
Bing Crosby enjoying a game at Jasper. Beautiful 
scenery. 

Saving Strokes with Sam Sniead, s-c-a, 1 reel, $1.50 
Golf champion Sam Snead illustrates his grip, 
his stance, his swing on each of several types of 
golf situations. Slow motion and "freeze" shots 
help to clarify the instruction. Shots with driver, 
brassie, and various irons for difficult lies are 
illustrated and finally his putting technique is 
shown. 



MEDICAL ASPECTS OF FITNESS 

(Continued from Page One) 

above. It has been stated that the three main 
factors that have improved school health 
programs and youth fitness have been: (1) 
increased cooperation and understanding 
among various agencies and professions in- 
terested in school health, (2) increased 
recognition that parents are primarily re- 
sponsible for their children's health, (3) 
greater concern for the role of the teacher in 
school health programs and for improving 
teachers' preparation in health. 

It can, therefore, be seen that the needed 
program for youth fitness is not new or 
revolutionary. Rather, it is evolutionary in 
nature and based upon tried and proven 
policies and practices. These have achieved 
acceptance by representative educators, 
public health personnel, and private prac- 
titioners of medicine. These ten points pre- 
sented here as a needed program for youth 
fitness are those that have been generally 
considered to be necessary: 

(1) We need a screening program in the 
schools, including checks on vision, hearing 
and growth to turn up problems that need 
referral through the family for medical or 
dental attention. 

(2) We need periodic medical examina- 
tions, preferably at the hands of the child's 
own family physician, to make certain chil- 
dren are in optimum condition for learning, 
for activity, for growth, and for living in 
general. 

(3) We need follow-up procedures that 
alert parents to the necessity of having 
remedial child health problems corrected as 
promptly and as fully as possible. 

(4) We need, as a corollary, a program 
that encourages optimum adjustment to 
health problems that cannot be remedied and 
special education for those whose handicaps 
do not permit them to learn effectively 
through the usual school program. 

(5) We need policies for accident preven- 
tion and communicable disease control in our 
schools and their environs which reduce pre- 
ventable illness and injury to a minimum 
and assure proper emergency care including 
first aid and follow thi^ough, when sudden 
illness and accidents occur. 

(6) We need environmental conditions in 
our homes, schools and communities that are 
conducive to health and that foster optimum 
growth and development. 

(7) We need sufficient time for a planned 
program of health instruction through grades 
one to twelve, which keeps pace with the 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLElTE FOR MARCH, 1958 



Page Eleven 



maturity level of children, which is taught 
by informed and interested teachers, and 
which stresses positive practices and prin- 
ciples of health behavior. 

(8) We need a broad program of physical 
education for all children, so well taught as 
to challenge and interest the weak and the 
average child, as well as the physically gifted. 

(9) We need professional leadership in 
education, medicine, and public health with 
the vision to agree on individual and group 
responsibilities for fitness, the skills to 
carry these out effectively, and the ability 
to interpret the over- all program to assure 
public support. 

(10) We need, above all, interprofessional 
teamwork among educators, private physic- 
ians, and public health personnel, which is 
based on mutual appreciation of each other's 
skills and abilities, respect for each other's 
professional prerogatives and responsibilities, 
and mutual dedication to the welfare of 
children and youth. 

These, then, are the ten points that must 
necessarily be a part of any program for 
youth fitness. It is up to you. the educators 
and the leaders of our youth in this state to 
implement such a program. 

The medical profession of the st^te of 
Kentucky nledges itself to aid vou in any 
way possible in helping accomplish a better 
program of youth fitness for the future. 



K. A. P. O. S. Letter 

Editor's note: Mrs. Stella S. Gilb, Executive Sec- 
retary of the Kentucky Association of Pep Or- 
ganizations Sponsors, has sent the following letter 
to the Cheerleader and Pep Club Sponsor at each 
district and regional basketball tournament site. 
Information given in the letter will be of interest 
to administrators and coaches as well as the person 
to whom the letter is addressed. 

Dear Cheerleader and Pep Club Sponsor: 

Congratulations! We are pleased to learn 
that your school has been selected as host 

for the basketball tournament. 

The financial success of basketball tourna- 
ments in the Stpte of Kentucky is usually an 
assured thing. It should be, considering all 
the work the tournament manager and his 
committee are called upon to do. However, 
there are other values to be derived from 
athletic contests, ones that can't be measured 
in dollars and cents; the opportunity to im- 
prove inter-school relationships, sportsman- 
ship, courtesy, and consideration for the 
rights of others. 



The Kentucky Association of Pep Organi- 
zation Sponsors is interested in many facets 
of the school program, but primarily they 
have been concerned with obtaining recog- 
nition for cheerleaders. You are probably 
aware of their award to an outstanding cheer- 
leading group chosen at the State Basketball 
Tournament. This award is not based on 
abilitv to execute cheers alone, but on sports- 
manship, courtesy, appearance, conduct, etc. 
Next to the members of the team the cheer- 
leaders are the most influential group in the 
school. 

The members of KAPOS are interested in 
learnin<? what measures can be taken by or- 
p-ari'75Jtions. other than the members of the 
basketball team, to relieve tensions among 
student bodies, and to promote better support 
amon^r school groups. We naturallv look to 
the cheerleaders and the pep club organi- 
zations to be the leaders in this movement. 

In order that others mav profit from and 
be inspired by your efforts, may we hear 
from you concerning your plans for welcom- 
ing and entertaining the players and cheer- 
leaders who will be ^^our guests during the 
tournament? Mr. Ted Sanford. of the K.H.- 
SA.A.. has volunteered to publish in the 
ATHT/ETE the best ideas and most novel ap- 
proaches submitted by a group. 

We hope you will submit some unusual 
ideas for promoting better relations with 
vour opponents ; in the meantime, you may 
find a new approach to the following sugges- 
tions : 

1. Write a note of welcome to all teams 
and cheerleaders who will be your guests 
during the tournaments 

2. Appoint a Welcome Committee 

a. Make provisions for dressing accom- 
modations for both players and cheerleaders 

3. Designate special seating areas ; decor- 
ate appropriately 

4. Make use of posters to welcome visit- 
ing teams 

-5. Exchange yells 

6. Invite cheerleaders to have refresh- 
ments at half-time 

7. Plan a "get together" party during the 
tournament 

Send us your plans for making YOUR 
tournament the most successful one in the 
State. Let others share in your success. 
Best wishes for a successful tournament. 
Sincerely. 
Stella S. Gilb 

Executive Secretary, KAPOS 
College of Education 
University of Kentucky 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MARCH, 1958 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky High 
School Athletic Association met at the Ken- 
tucky Hotel, Louisville, on Saturday morn- 
ing, February 1, 1958. The meeting was called 
to order by President Russell Williamson at 
9:30, with Vice-President Louis Litchfield; 
Directors W. H. Crowdus, Jack Dawson, K. 
G. Gillaspie, W. B. Jones, and Cecil A. Thorn- 
ton ; Commissioner Theo. A. Sanf ord and 
Assistant Commissioner J. B. Mansfield 
present. 

W. H. Crowdus moved, seconded by Louis 
Litchfield, that the reading of the minutes 
of the January 5th meeting be waived, since 
the members of the Board had received 
copies of these minutes. The motion was car- 
ried unanimously. 

The Commissioner, reporting for the State 
Swimming Committee, made the following 
recommendations: That the Class A State 
Swimminff Meet be held in Lexincrton on Sat- 
urday. February 22; that the State Swim- 
miner Meet for Classes B and C be held in 
Lexington on Saturday, April 12 ; that Class 
A events be the same as the 1957 events, 
with the addition of the 400 Yard Freestvle 
and the 100 Yard Butterfly; that the 200 
Yard Medley Relay renlace the 150 Yard 
Medley Relay in Class B; that the 50 Yard 
Butterfly replace the 50 Yard Breaststroke 
in Class C. Jack Dawson moved, seconded by 
K. G. Gillaspie, that the changes in the State 
Swimming Meet regulations, recommended 
bv the Commissioner, be approved. The mo- 
tion was carried unanimously. 

Assistant Commissioner Mansfield re- 
ported that the advance sale of State Tourna- 
tickets had been very fine, and that it was 
possible that some of the sessions would be 
sold out on or before the opening date of 
the Tournament. 

W. B. Jones moved, seconded by Louis 
Litchfield, that the following regulations 
concei-ning fees for regional tournament of- 
ficials be adopted: The official shall receive 
a fee of $20.00 per game and a transporta- 
tion allowance of 7c per mile for all neces- 
sary travel. In the event it is necessaiy for 
the official to remain overnie-ht at the tour- 
nament site, he shall be paid an additional 
$10.00 per dav for lodging and meals, ^^n 
exception shall be made for Region 7 which 
will have only four teams in its regional 
tournament. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. 



Cecil A. Thornton moved, seconded by 
Jack Dawson, that the State Track Meet be 
held in Lexington on May 16-17, and that 
the Commissioner be authorized to set the 
dates and determine the sites of the other 
spring events. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

The Board approved the usual invitation 
to the K.H.S.A.A. dinner meeting, scheduled 
to be held in Louisville on Thursday, April 
10, and authorized the Commissioner to send 
two complimentary tickets to each member 
school upon request. 

The Commissioner reported that he and 
President Williamson had broken ties in the 
balloting for basketball tournament sites in 
district 14, 21, 42, and 50, in favor of the 
Caneyville High School, the Adair County 
High School, the Versailles High School and 
the Corbin High School respectively. K. G. 
Gillaspie moved, seconded by W. B. Jones, 
that the action of the President and Com- 
missioner be confirmed. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

Chairman W. H. Crowdus of the Football 
Championship Committee reported on the 
auestionnaire which had been sent out since 
the last meeting of the Board to K.H.S.A.A. 
member schools maintaining football teams; 
Mr. Crowdus stated that approximately 100 
completed questionnaires had been received, 
and that the great majority of school men 
seemed to favor some type of playoff in 
^"ootball, with various plans being suggested. 
His committee was authorized to continue 
the study concerning the feasibility of the 
Association declaring an official champion- 
ship in football by a playoff series. 

W. B. Jones moved, seconded by K. G. 
Gillaspie, that all bills of the Association, 
beginning January 5, 1958, and ending Janu- 
ary 31, 1958. be allowed. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

The Board was then called to order in its 
capacity as Board of Directors of the K.H.- 
S.A.A. Protection Fund. 

Secretary-Treasurer oanford presented a 
list of claims which had been paid by the 
Protection Fund since January 5, 1958, the 
total amount of these claims being $2,867.60. 
W. H. Crowdus moved, seconded by Louis 
T.itchfield, that the claims as presented by 
the Secretary-Treasurer of the Protection 
Fund be allowed. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meet- 
ing adjourned. 



Wb Ship "Imp DaV You BuV" 

HUNT'S ATHLETE GOODS CO., Inc. 

103 ^ PHONES — 104 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

K H S A A STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT 

During your stay in Lexington for the 1958 K.H.S.A.A. State Basket- 
ball Tournament we extend you a very cordial invitation to make our 
sample room, No. 463 at the Phoenix Hotel, your headquarters. 

For years coaches, fans, players, and friends have made our room 
their headquarters. Come in and see us. 

Visit us and the factory representatives who will be available to 
assist you with your athletic requirements of all types. A complete display 
of Spring and Summer merchandise as well as 1958 lines of football and 
basketball equipment including honor sweaters, award jackets, chenille 
letters, trophies and uniforms will be shown. 

Our salesmen will be present to welcome you and to help you with 
your trouble. 

NO. 97 BASEBALLS 
OFFICIAL FOR K.H.S.A.A. BASEBALL TOURNAMENT 

The official No. 97 League MacGregor Baseball will be the official 
baseball for the Kentucky High School Athletic Association Baseball Tour- 
nament to be held later on this year. 

BASEBALL AND SOFTBALL UNIFORMS AND EQUIPMENT 

We have uniforms in stock ready for immediate delivery. Also Louis- 
ville Slugger Bats, MacGregor No. 97 baseballs, gloves, shoes and all types 
of equipment. 

Our Spring and Summer catalog will be mailed to you gladly upon 
request. 

Please remember that for the best possible service call Mayfield 103, 
and remember "WE SHIP THE DAY YOU BUY." 



Hunt's Athletic Goods Co. 

INCORPORATED 

Phone 103 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

THE LARGEST EXCLUSIVE ATHLETIC HOUSE IN THE SOUTH 





Sutcliffe always has them-' on time! ^ 

BASEBALL UNIFORMS 




IN STOCK FOR 

IMMEDIATE 
DELIVERY 

2 PIECE SUITS - SHIRTS & PANTS 

Swatches of Fabric in Each Price 
Range Sent Promptly Upon Request 

We have in stock several grades in 
Caps, Belts and Stockings. These are 
shown in our NEW 1958 Athlete Cata- 
log which you should have. 



J 



K. E. A. When in Louisville be sure to visit Sutcliffe's Display quarters 
at Room 812, Kentucky Hotel, April 9-10-11. See, inspect and order 
your athletic goods equipment for Summer, for next Fall and next year. 

STATE BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT ir ikir 

Lexington March 19 - 20 - 21 -22 

See SUTCLIFFE REPRESENTATIVES 

Rooms 461 - 462 PHOENIX HOTEL 



• •• 



Reach American League Baseballs, each $2.35 Spalding National League Baseballs, each $2.35 

Wilson American Ass'n Baseballs, each $2.35 Sutcliffe Official League Baseballs, each $2.35 

LOUISVILLE SLUGGER BATS 

No. 125 - Natural White Ash, each $3.40 No. 150 - White Ash, each $2.70 

Plenty of lower price Bats also in Stock for At Once Delivery 

Write to Sutcliffe for complete illustrated, descriptive Catalog and listing 
of school prices on baseball, soft ball, track, tennis and golf. 

UTCLIFFE CO 

LOUISVILLE 1, KENTUCKY 





Hiqh khool Afhkh 



ST.'XAVIER HIGH SCHOOL BASKETBALL TEAM 
K. H. S. A. A. CHAMPION - 1958 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Jay Barton, Mike Cahill, Jerry Kazunas, Lucian 
Raque, Judge Moseley, Terry Brown. Second Row: Mgr. Dennie McCrory, George 
Herbig, Larry Buddy, Louis Story, Eddie Schnurr, Tony Hildenbrand, Jim Miller, 
Mgr. Mike Pollio. Third Row: Coach Gene Rhodes, Kenny Wessel, Jim Showalter, 
Ben Monhollen, Jim McDonald, Fred Spatz, Ass't. Coach Bill Reiss. 




District Tournament Games Won 

St. Xavier 51-49 Central 

St. Xavier 85-59 Plaget 

St. Xavier 74-62 Manual 



Regional Tournament Games Won 

St. Xavier 58-37 Pern Creek 

St. Xavier 57-31 Manual 



OHicial Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

APRIL - 1958 



Daviess County— Runner-Up 
1958 State Basketball Tournament 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Johnny Newman, Ed Allen, Jerry Truitt, Melton Crowe. 
Second Row: Coach Buck Sydnor, Carol Evans, Robbie Horrell, Don Crosley, Larry Elliott, Bobby 
Rascoe, Joe Adkisson, Ronnie Well, Mark Luckett, Ass't. Coach George Claiborne. 



Clark County— Third Place Winner 
1958 State Basketball Tournament 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Pat Carrington, Caren Keffer, Frances Elliott, Suesan Noel, 
Marie Stephenson, Pam Carter. Second Row: Mgr. Lawrence Proffitt, Sterling Staton, James 
Poer, Paul Miller, Tommy Harper, Ronald Chism, Larry Estes, Mgr. Robert Johnson. Third Row: 
Ass't Coach Eugene Horton, Charles Jett, Danny Dickerson, Paul Smith, Gary Lorenz, Henry 
Corns, Joe Farris, Coach Letcher Norton. 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



Vol. XX— No. 9 



APRIL, 1958 



$1.00 Per Year 



1958 'Annual Meeting 

The business meeting of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association will be held 
on Thursday, April 10, at 2:30 P.M. The 
place will be the South Room at the Brown 
Hotel, Louisville. The dinner meeting will 
be held in the Crystal Ballroom of the Brown 
Hotel, the hour being 6:00 P. M. 

The principal speaker at the dinner meet- 
ing will be Dean Lyman V. Ginger of the 
University of Kentucky, President of the 
National Education Association. The presen- 
tation of the Game Guy Award will be made 
during the meeting, and the program will 
also include entertainment features. 

As provided in Article IX, Section 1, of 
the K.H.S.A.A. Constitution, the following 
changes in the Constitution, By-Laws, and 
Tournament Rules, to be acted upon by the 
Delegate Assembly, are hereby submitted to 
all members of the K.H.S.A.A. for their con- 
sideration. 

PROPOSAL I 

The Board of Control proposes that By- 
Law 4 be amended to read as follows; "A 
contestant becomes ineligible on his nine- 
teenth birthday, with the following excep- 
tions: 1) If a student becomes nineteen vears 
of age on or after September 1, he is eligible 
to compete in football for the remainder of 
that season ; and 2) If a student becomes 
nineteen years of age on or after December 
1. he is eligible to compete in all snorts for 
the remainder of that school year." 
PROPOSAL II 

The Board of Control proposes that the 
followinsr be added as paragraph 11 of Article 
IV, Section 3-d of the K.H.S.A.A. Constitu- 
tion: "Have authority to set up a plan for 
determining a state championship in foot- 
ball." 

PROPOSAL III 

The Board of Control and the State Track 
Committee propose that the following be add- 
ed to Track Rule IX and to the second para- 
graph of Track Rule XII: "Five participants 
may be named to a relay team, any four of 
whom may be used in a heat or the finals." 
(Continued on Page Twelve) 



BOARD MEMBERS RE-ELECTED 

I- 





H. Crowdus 



Jack Dawson 



Prin. W. H. Crowdus of the Franklin Jun- 
ior High School and Mr. Jack Dawson, Direc- 
tor of New Buildings for the Jefferson Coun- 
ty Board of Education, will represent Sections 
3 and 4 respectively on the Board of Control 
for a four-year period, beginning July 1, 
1958. Each Director is beginning his second 
four-year term of Board membership. Mr. 
Crowdus defeated Prin. W. I-. Gardner of the 
Park Citv High School, and Mr. Dawson won 
over Prin. John M. Potter of the Gallatin 
Countv Hie-h School, in balloting which end- 
ed on March 1. 

Mr. Crowdus is a native of Franklin, whei^e 
he attended the grade and hisrh schools, 
s-raduating in 1927. He attended Western 
Kentucky State College, where he received 
his B.S. and M.A. degrees. He has his degree 
of Rec. Dir. from Indiana University, and 
has completed his course work for his Re.D. 

Fi-om 1935 to 1942 Mr. Crowdus worked 
at Western as trainer and assistant in the 
Physical Education Department. He served in 
the U. S. Navy during the 1942-45 period. 
In Franklin Junior High School, he started 
teaching in the field of Health and Physical 
Education. He has assisted in varsitv foot- 
ball and basketball. In January of 1953 he 
became principal of the junior high school. 

In 1943 Mr. Crowdus married Miss Ina 

Bledsoe of Hiseville. He is a member of the 

Franklin Rotary Club, and is Chairman of 

the Official Board in the Franklin Methodist 

(Continued on Page Nine) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1958 



APRIL, 1958 VOL. XX— NO. 9 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered aa second-class matter in the post office at Lexington, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELD 

I^exington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (1956-60), Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1957-61), Marion 

Directors — W. B. Jones (1957-61) Somerset: W. H. Crowdus 
(1964-58), Franklin; Jack Dawson (1964-68), Louisville; 
Robert P. Forsythe (1956-59), Greenville; K. G. Gillaspie 
(1965-69), Georgetown; Cecil A. Thornton (1966-60), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



Jrom the Commlssionel s Dffi 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1957-58 Basketball Participation List 
(Eligibility) 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials 

3. Official's Report on Schools (Basket- 
ball) 



REGIONAL TRACK MEETS 

The Board of Control has established 
twelve track regions for 1958. The scheduled 
date for the regional meets is May 9. Only 
first and second place winners in the regions 
will qualify for the State Meet. Sites of the 
meets are: MurraJ^ Henderson, Bowling 
Green, Danville, Louisville (Bellarmine Col- 
lege), Louisville (Shawnee), Bellevue, New- 
port, Lexington, Barbourville, Elkhorn City, 
and Ashland. 

The assignment of schools by regions is 
as follows: 

Murray Region — Ballard Memorial, Cald- 
well County, Cuba. Fulton, Hopkinsville, 
Lacy, Murray, Paducah Tilghman, South 
Christian, Trigg County. 

Henderson Region — Daviess County, Doug- 
lass, Henderson, Henderson County, Holy 
Name, Lewisport, Madisonville, Owensboro. 
Providence, Sturgis. 

Bowlinp Green Region — Austin-Tracy, 
Bowling Green, Brownsville, Campbellsville, 
Caverna, College, Drakesboro Community, 
Elizabethtown, Ft. Knox, Franklin-Simpson, 
Glasgow, Greensburg, Guthrie. High Street, 
Hiseville. Howevallev, Leitchfield, Lincoln, 
Meade Countv. Metcalfe County. Muhlen- 
berg Central, Park City, Temple Hill, Todd 
County Training, Tompkinsville, Vine Grove. 

Danville Region — Bardstown, Bate, Crab 
Orchard, Danville, Eubank. Junction City, 
Lebanon, Monticello, Old Kentucky Home, 
Parksville, Perryville, Rosenwald, St. Joseph, 



STATE TRACK MEET SCHEDULE 

Lexington, Kentucky, May 16-17 

(Time is Central Daylight Time) 
FRIDAY 

2:15 P. M.— 120 Yard High Hurdles (4 heats), 
3 from each heat qualify for Semi-finals; Shot Put 
and Pole Vault, Finals. 

2:35 P. M.— 100 Yard Dash (4 heats), 2 from each 
heat qualify for Finals. 

2:50 P. M.— 120 Yard High Hurdles (Semi-finals), 
3 from each heat qualify for Finals. 

3:05 P. M.— 880 Yard Relay (4 heats), 3 from 
each heat qualify for Semi-finals. 

3:35 P. M.— 440 Yard Dash (3 heats), 2 from 
each heat qualify for Finals. 

4:00 P. M.— 180 Yard Low Hurdles (4 heats), 3 
from each heat qualify for Semi-finals. 

4:20 P. M.— 880 Yard Run (3 heats), 2 from each 
heat qualify for Finals. 

4:45 P. M.— 220 Yard Dash (4 heats), 2 from each 
heat qualify for Finals. 

5:05 P. M.— 180 Yard Low Hurdles (Semi-finals), 
3 from each heat qualify for Finals. 

5:20 P. M.— 880 Yard Relay (Semi-finals), 3 from 
each heat qualify for Finals. 

5:35 P. M.— Mile Relay ( 3 heats), 2 from each 
heat qualify for Finals. 
SATURDAY 

1:00 P. M. — ^High Jump and Discus 

2:00 P. M.— 120 Yard High Hurdles 

2:15 P. M.— 100 Yard Dash 

2:30 P. M.— Mile Run and Broad Jump 

2:45 P. M.— 880 Yard Relay 

3:00 P. M.— 440 Yard Dash 

3:15 P. M.— 180 Yard Low Hurdles 

3:30 P. M.— 880 Yard Run 

3:45 P. M.— 220 Yard Dash 

4:00 P. M.— Mile Relay 

A change has been made in the method of ex- 
change for the Mile Relay. The first and second 
runners of each team will keep the same relative 
positions from the pole. For the third and foui-th 
runners, the position will be reversed to the out- 
side. This should eliminate a good deal of the cross- 
ing in the early stages of the race and reduce the 
chances of accidents and fouling. 



Springfield. 

Bellarmine Region — Butler, Carrollton, 
Durrett, Eastern, Fern Creek, Kentucky 
Military Institute, Lincoln Institute, Oldham 
County, Pleasureville, Southern, Trinity, 
Valley, Waggener. 

Louisville Region — Atherton, Central, du- 
Pont Manual, Flaget, Male, St. Xavier, 
Shawnee. 

Bellevue Region — Bellevue, Davton, Dixie 
Heiffhts, Holmes. Lloyd, Simon Kenton. Wal- 
ton-Verona, William Grant. 

Newport Region — Boone County. Camp- 
bell County, Grant County, Highlands, New- 
port, Orangeburg. 

Lexington Region — Berea Foundation, 
Bourbon County, Bi-idgeport, Carlisle. Du- 
Bois, Dunbar, Frankfort, Garth, Henry Clay, 
Irvine, Lafayette, Lexington Catholic, Madi- 
son-Central, Millersburg Military Institute, 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1958 



Page Three 



Paris, Peaks Mill, Scott County, Shelbyville, 
University, Versailles, Western. 

Barbourville Region — Barbourville, Bell 
County, Benham, Corbin, East Benham, 
Evarts, Hazel Green, Knox Central, Middles- 
boro, Pineville, Red Bird, Rosenwald, Somer- 
set, Williamsburg, Woodbine. 

Elkhom City Region — Belfry, Dunham, 
Elkhorn City, Flat Gap, Fleming-Neon, Haz- 
ard, Jenkins, Martin, Napier, Paintsville, 
Pikeville, Prestonsburg, Virgie, Wayland, 
Whitesburg. 

Ashland Region — Ashland, Booker T. 
Washington, Catlettsburg, Fairview, McKell, 
Raceland, Russell, Wurtland. 

Tennis Tournaments 

On May 12 four regional tennis tourna- 
ments will be held. The sites are Bowling 
Green, Louisville, Lexington, and Bellevue. 
the State Tennis Tournament will be held 
in Louisville on May 19-20. The assignment 
of schools by regions is as follows: 

Bowling Green Region — Bardstown, Bowl- 
ing Green, College, Ft. Knox, Franklin-Simp- 
son, Dawson Springs, Douglass, Drakesboro 
Community, Glasgow, Henderson, Hopkins- 
ville, Lincoln, Madisonville, Muhlenberg Cen- 
tral, Owensboro, Russellville, St. Joseph. 

Louisville Region — Atherton, Butler, Cen- 
tral, Durrett, Eastern, Fern Creek, Flaget, 
Kentucky Military Institute, Louisville Coun- 
try Day, Male, St. Xavier, Shawnee, Southern, 
Trinity, Valley, Waggener. 

Lexington Region — Ashland, Berea Foun- 
dation, Elkhorn, Hazel Green, Millersburg 
Military Institute, Monticello, Paintsville, 
Paris, Pikeville, Rosenwald, University. 

Bellevue Region — Bellevue, Grant County, 
Holmes, Lloyd. 

Golf Tournaments 

Seven regional tournaments have been set 
up in golf. These tournaments will be held 
on May 21 at Madisonville, Bowling Green, 
Louisville, Dixie Heights, Danville, Middles- 
boro, and Paintsville. The State Golf Tour- 
nament will be held at Paintsville on May 
27-28. The assignment of schools by regions 
is as follows: 

Madisonville Region — Caldwell County, 
Dawson Springs, Fulton, Greenville, Hart- 
ford, Henderson, Hopkinsville, Madisonville, 
Mayfield, Murray, Owensboro. 

Bowling Green Region — Bardstown, Bowl- 
ing, College, Ft. Knox, Franklin-Simpson, 
Glasgow, High Street, Lincoln, North War- 
ren, Russellville, St. Joseph, Scottsville, Vine 
Grove. 

Louisville Region — Atherton, Butler, Cen- 



tral, duPont Manual, Durrett, Eastern, Fern 
Creek, Flaget, Kentucky Military Institute, 
Louisville Country Day, Male, Oldham Coun- 
ty, St. Xavier, Shawnee, Southern, Trinity, 
Valley, Waggener. 

Dixie Heights Region — Beechwood, Cov- 
ington Catholic, Dixie Heights, Highlands, 
Holmes, Lloyd, St. Henry, St. Thomas. 

Danville Region — Danville, Lebanon, Mays- 
ville, Paris, St. Augustine, Shelbyville, 
Springfield, University. 

Middlesboro Region — ^Cumberland, East 
Main Street, Middlesboro, Somerset. 

Paintsville Region — Ashland, Boyd County, 
Fairview, Hazard, Martin, Paintsville, Pike- 
ville, Prestonsburg. 

BASEBALL TOURNAMENTS 

The district baseball tournaments are 
scheduled to be held on May 5-7. The dates 
should be set by the district tournament 
managers, and should represent the think- 
ing of the majority of principals or coaches 
in the district involved. The regional tourna- 
ments will be held on May 22-23, and the 
State Baseball Tournament is scheduled to be 
played at Stoll Field, University of Kentucky, 
Lexington on June 4-5. The assignment of 
schools to the various districts and regions 
is as follows: 

MURRAY REGION 

South Christian District — Hopkinsville, 
Lacy, South Christian, Trigg County. 

Murray District — Benton, Douglass, Farm- 
ington, Murray, Murray Training, North 
Marshall, South Marshall. 

Heath District — Ballard Memorial, Car- 
lisle County, Heath, Lone Oak, Paducah, 
Reidland, St. John's, St. Mary's. 

Mayfield District — Central, Cuba, Fancy 
Farm, Fulgham, Fulton County, Lowes, May- 
field, Sedalia, Wingo. 

Livingston Central District — Caldwell 
County, Crittenden County, Fredonia, Liv- 
ingston Central, Lyon County. 

GREENVILLE REGION 

Henderson District — Douglass, Henderson, 
Henderson County, Holy Name, Slaughters. 

Irvington District — Breckinridge County, 
Cloverport, Hawesville, Irvington, Lewisport. 

Hartford District — Beaver Dam, Center- 
town, Fordsville, Hartford, Horse Branch. 

Owensboro District — Daviess County, Ow- 
ensboro, Owensboro Catholic, Owensboro 
Technical, Owensboro Western, Utica. 

Madisonville District — Calhoun, Earling- 
ton, Livermore, Madisonville, Sacramento, 
South Hopkins. 

Greenville District — Bremen, Central City, 



Page Four THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1958 

Drakesboro, Drakesboro Community, Gra- Versailles. 

ham, Greenville, Hughes Kirk, Muhlenberg Paris District — Bourbon County, Carlisle, 

Central. Cynthiana, Harrison County, Millersburg 

Morganfield District — Morganfield, Provi- Military Institute, Nicholas County, Paris, 

dence, St. Vincent, Sebree, Uniontown. Paris Western. 

BOWLING GREEN REGION Harrodsburg District — Buckeye, Camp 

Bowling Green District — Bowling Green, Dick Robinson, Danville, Harrodsburg, Lan- 
Bristow, College, Franklin-Simpson, High caster, Mercer County, Parksville. 
Street, Lincoln, North Warren, Richardsville, Stanford District — Crab Orchard, Huston- 
Warren County. ville, McKinney, Memorial, Mt. Vernon, Paint 

Russellville District — Adairville, Auburn, Lick, Stanford. 

Guthrie, Lewisburg, Russellville, Todd Coun- Carrollton District — Campbellsburg, Car- 

ty, Todd County Training. rollton. Eminence, Gallatin County, Henry 

Tompkinsville District — Austin Tracy, Central, Pleasureville, Trimble County. 

Clinton County, Gamaliel, Glasgow, Scotts- Lexington District — Athens, Henry Clay, 

ville. Temple Hill, Tompkinsville. Lafayette, Lexington Catholic, Nicholasville, 

Caverna District — Caverna, Cub Run, Hise- University, Wilmore. 

ville, Hodgenville, Memorial, Metcalfe Coun- Richmond District — Berea, Estill County, 

ty, Munfordville. Irvine, Lee County, Madison-Central, Madi- 

Brownsville District — Brownsville, Butler son-Model. 
County, Clarkson, Kyrock, Leitchfield, Sun- Shelbyville District— Bagdad, Lincoln In- 
fish, stitute, Oldham County, Shelbyville, Simp- 

Campbellsville District — Adair County, sonville, Taylorsville, Waddy. 

Campbellsville Greensburg, Lebanon, St. MIDDLESBORO REGION 
Augustme, St. Charles, St. Francis, Taylor 

County. Somerset District — Eubank, Ferguson, 

St. Joseph District — Bardstown, Bloom- Hazel Green, London, Monticello. Pulaski 

field, Fredericktown, Lebanon Junction, Mt. County, Russell County, Somerset, Wayne 

Washington, Old Kentucky Home, St. Joseph, County. 

Shepherdsville, Springfield, Willisburg. Hall District— Black Star, Cumberland, 

Vine Grove District— Elizabethtown. Eliza- East Main Street, Evarts, Hall, Harlan, 

bethtown Catholic, Ft. Knox, Glendale, Howe- Loyall, Rosenwald, Wallms, West Main 

valley, Lynnvale, Rineyville, Sonora, Vine Street. 

Qrove. Middlesboro District — Barbourville, Bell 

LOUISVILLE REGION County, Corbin, Henderson Settlement, Lone 

Louisville District — Atherton, Central, Jack, Middlesboro, Pleasant View. 
Flaget, Male, duPont Manual, St. Xavier, Jenkins District— Carr Creek, Fleming- 
Shawnee. Neon, Hindman, Jenkins, Letcher, Whites- 

Trinitv District — Butler, Eastern, Fern burg. 

Creek, Kentucky Military Institute, Louisville Leslie County District— Buckhorn, Combs, 

Country Day, Southern, Trinity, Valley. Hazard, Leatherwood, Leslie County, Napier. 

NEWPORT REGION Cit^"'Fed" Creek ^Sevill^^Vir'Se ^^^^''™ 

St. Henry District — Boone County, Lloyd y> ^ > . <= ■ 

Memorial, St. Henry, Simon Kenton, Walton- GRAYSON REGION 

Verona. Ashland District — Ashland, Booker T. 

Beechwood District— Beechwood, Dixie Washington, Boyd County, Catlettsburg, 

Heights, Holmes, Holy Cross, Ludlow. Fairview, Holy Family. 

Ft. Thomas District — Campbell County, McKell District— Greenup, McKell, Race- 
Highlands, St. Thomas, Silver Grove. land, Russell, South Portsmouth, Wurtland. 

Grant County District— Butler, Falmouth, Mt. Sterling District — Camargo, Clark 

Grant County, Morgan, Williamstown. County, DuBois, Montgomery County, Mt. 

Newport District— Bellevue, Dayton, New- Sterling, Owingsville, Powell County, Sharps- 
port, Newport Catholic. burg, Winchester. 

Maysville District— Bracken County, May's Grayson District — Breckinridge Training, 

Lick, Maysville, Tollesboro. Fleming County, Morehead, Olive Hill, 

VERSAILLES REGION Prichard. 

Frankfort District^ — Anderson, Elkhorn, Paintsville District — Blaine, Ezel, Inez, 

Frankfort, Garth, Peaks Mill, Scott County, Louisa, Meade, Morgan County, Oil Springs, 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1958 



Page Five 



1958 Kentucky State High School 

University of Kentucky Coliseum, Lexington, Kentucky, 



CLASS A 
Results 

Lafayette 93 

Atherton 90 

St. Xavier 79 

duPont Manual 12 

1. 400 Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1 : Hall, Atherton, (5 :41.4) ; 
Bader, Atherton (5:46.3); Tandy, St. 
Xavier (5 :55.8j : Durham, Lafayette 
(6:43.8); S. Cooke, Lafayette (7:10.6); 
McDonald, St. Xavier (7:17.8). 

Heat No. 2: Freeman, Lafayette 
(4:48.5); Parsons, St. Xavier (6:00.8); 
Daniels. Atherton (6:20.1); Gettlefinger, 
St. Xavier (5 :20.5) ; Hammonds, Lafay- 
ette (6:29.7); Barr, Atherton (5:61.2). 
Finals 

1. Freeman, Lafayette 4:48.6 

2. Parsons, St. Xavier 5:00.8 

3. Daniels. Atherton 5:20.1 

4. Gettlefinger, St. Xavier 5:20.6 

5. Hammonds, Lafayette 5 :29.7 

B. Hall. Atherton 5:14.4 

Freeman set a new state record in 
this event with his time of 4:48.5. This is 
a new event. 
2. 50 Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1 : Schmidt, St. Xavier 
{:25.4); Reid, St. Xavier ( :26.5) ; Lowery, 
Lafayette ( :28.3) ; Royalty, Lafayette 
(:31.2). 

Heat No. 2 : Lussky, Atherton ( :25.8) ; 
Stamatis, Lafayette ( :27.3) ; Ryan, Ath- 
erton ( :28.7) ; Patterson, duPont Manual 
(:28.9); Hines, St. Xavier (:34.7). 

Cooke, Lafayette ( :25.4) ; 
r ( :26.1) ; Craddock, Ath- 
Weiss, Atherton (28.9) ; 
lanual (:30.2). 
Finals 

Cooke, Lafayette 

Schmidt, St. Xavier 
Lussky, Atherton 



Heat No. 3 
Karem, St. Xav 
erton ( :28.2) ; 
George, duPont 



Kar 



St. Xa 



5. Reid, St. Xavier 

6. Stamatis, Lafayette 

3. 100 Yard Butterfly — 

Heat No. 1: Hill, Lafayette (1:10.1): 
Skiles, Lafayette (1:17.3); Sullivan, St. 
Xavier (1 :18.5) ; Merkt, St. Xavier 
(1:41.3). 

Heat No. 2 : Roberts, Lafayette 
(1:03.2): Morrison, Atherton (1:13.3); 
Bush, Atherton (1 :17.7) ; Vuturo, St. 
Xavier (1:41.2). 

Finals 

1. Roberts. Lafayette 1:02.7 

2. Hill, Lafayette 1 :10.2 



3. Morrison, Atherton 1 :12.6 

4. Bush, Atherton 1:13.1 

6. Skiles, St. Xavier 1:17.9 

6. Sullivan, St. Xavier 1:19.3 

i. 200 Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1: Dillard, Lafayette (2 :- 
18.2); Lococo, St. Xavier (2:23); Ham- 
monds, Lalayeite (2:31.1); liohmann, 
Atherton {'^ :3ri) ; Tandy, St. Xavier (2 :- 
48.8); McDonald, St, Aavier (3:19.6). 

Heat iMo. 2 : Monroe, Atherton (2 :- 
17.3) Bader, Atherton (2:32.7); Hall, 
Atherton (z:43.7); Durham, Lafayette 
(2:68.4); Lyncn, St. Xavier (3:24.2); 
Cooke, Lafayette (3:38.5). 
b'inals 

1. Monroe, Atherton 2:12.3 

2. Dillard, Lafayette 2:14.5 

3. Lococo, St. Xavier 2:19.8 

4. Hammonds, Lafayette 2:28.7 

5. Bader, Atherton 2:30.1 

6. Hohmann, Atherton 2:35.7 

5. lUO Yard Backstroke — 

Heat No. 1 : Schmidt, St. Xavier 
(1:09.8); Langston, Lafayette (1:13.4) 
Sympson, Lafayette (1:14.2) Ryan, Ather- 
ton (1:16.4); Lang, Atherton (1:19.7) 
Isaacs, duPont Manual (1:28.5). 

Heat No. 2 : Davis, Atherton (1 :06) 
Mathews, St. Xavier (1:13.4); Honican, 
Lafayette (1 :16.6) ; Rausch, St. Xavier 
(1:06.5) ; Weiss (1:29.6). 
Finals 

1. Davis, Atherton 1 

2. Schmidt, St. Xavier 1 

3. Langston, Lafayette 1:11.1 

4. Mathews, St. Xavier 1:13.6 

5. Sympson, Lafayette 1 :17.6 

B. Honican. Lafayette 1:18.7 

6. 100 Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1 : Gettlefinger, St. Xavier 
(1:00.8); Hill, Lafayette (1:01.1); Ban-, 
Atherton (1:08.7); Shellhamer, St. Xavier 
(1:14.1); Newman, Lafayette (1:18.5); 
Chanda, St. Xavier (1:24.7). 

Heat No. 2 : Freeman, Lafayette 
( :58.3) ; Sturgeon, Atherton ( :69) ; Eoles, 
Atherton (1:04.1); Noltemeyer, St. Xav- 
ier (1:18.1) Glass, Lafayette (1:32.7). 
Finals 

1. Freeman, Lafayette :67.4 

Sturgeon. Atherton :59.0 

Gettlefinger, St. Xavier 1 :00.0 

Hill, Lafayette 1:00.7 

Eoles, Atherton 1:02.2 

Barr, Atherton 1 :08.7 

100 Yard Breaststrokc — 

Heat No. 1 : Parsons, St. Xavier (1 :- 

13.71; Remmers, St. Xavier (1:19.3): 

Reilly, St. Xavier (1:24.0); Hammonds, 

Lafayette (1:29.4): Crosby, duPont Man- 



Swimming Meet 

February 22, 1958 

ual (1:39.3). 

lieat xso. 2: Lawrence, Atherton 
(1:13.7); J;'oster, iiinerton (l:az.O); 
Comos, Lafayette (1 :Z1.'6) ; Diebold, bt. 
Aavier (l;z6.1); Karsner, Lalayetie 
(1:41.8). 

Finals 

1. Parsons, St. Jvavier 1:12.4 

1. Lawrence, Atnerton 1 :12.4 

3. Remmers, Si. A.avier i :18.8 

4. 1' oster, Atnerton i :/i2.5 

6. KeiUy, St. Aavier 1 :24.3 

6. Comos, Lafayette 1 :ao.o 

Parsons ana i^awrence set a new state 
record in this event with their time ol 
1:12.4. 
8. Fancy Diving — 

Finals 

1. Craddock, Atherton 180.3 

2. Hutti, St. Xavier 175.15 

3. Profumo, St. Xavier 168.45 

4. Fleming, Lafayette 167.75 

6. Allen, Lafayette 151.75 

6. Egalite, Lalayette 147.45 

a. 160 Yard Individual Medley — 

Heat No. 1: Morrison, Atherton (1:- 
50.5); Honican, Lafayette (2:03.0); Sul- 
livan, St. Xavier (2:06.2); Foster, Ather- 
ton (2:11.8); Sympson, Lafayette (2 :- 
13.3). 

Heat No. 2: Roberts, Lafayette (1:- 
40.0); Lococo, St, Xavier (1:66.8); Rem- 
mers, St. Xavier (2:02.2); Royalty, La- 
fayette (2:35.7). 

Finals 

1. Roberts, Lafayette 1:39.7 

2. Morrison, Atherton 1 :50.1 

3. Lococo, St. Xavier 1 :52.5 

4. Honican, Lafayette 2:02.1 

5. Remmers, St. Xavier 2:03.8 

6. Sullivan. St. Xavier 2:04.2 

10. 200 Yard Medley Belay— 

Finals 

1. Atherton (Roles, Bush, Davis, Law- 
rence) 2 :01.7 

2. Lafayette (Langston, Combs, Skiles, 
E. Cooke) 2:06.0 

3. St. Xavier (Mathews, Reilly, Merkt, 
Reid) 2 :18.0 

4. duPont Manual (Isaacs, Crosby, Berry, 
Suhr) 2 :25.9 

11. 200 Yard Freestyle Relay- 

Finals 

1. Atherton (Monroe, Lussky, Daniels, 
Sturgeon) 1 :42.7 

2. Lafayette (Stamatis, Dillard, Ham- 
monds, Lowry) 1:48.3 

3. St. Xavier (Karem, Burmester, Hutti, 
Profumo) 1 :68.0 

4. duPont Manual (George, Patterson, 
Detrick, Hillen) 2:02.5 



Paintsville, Salyersville, Sandy Hook, Van 
Lear, Warfield. 

Prestonsburg District — Auxier, Martin, 
Maytown, Prestonsburg, Wayland, Wheel- 
wright. 



New Baseball Film 

A film of the World Series of 1957 between 
the Milwaukee Braves and the New York 
Yankees has been received by the K.H.S.A.A. 
from the National Federation Office, and has 
been placed in the Film Library of the Uni- 
versity of Kentucky. It is a black and white 
sound film, running approximately 40 min- 
utes. It is available for immediate booking. 

The narrator, Lew Fonseca, describes the 
highlights of the seven-game series as the 
National League champion Braves defeat 



the Yankees of the American League. The 
Yankees win the first game of the series at 
Yankee Stadium, but the games are even 
as the teams move to Milwaukee. The Braves 
lead three games to two after the stand on 
their home field. The sixth game is won by 
the Yankees, and for the second straight year 
the series goes the full seven games. In the 
final game, right-hander Lew Burdette, for 
the third time in the series, shows his mas- 
tery over the Yanks, and Milwaukee becomes 
the home of the World Champions of base- 
ball. 

The picture catches most of the hitting, 
along with the plays that resulted in runs 
being scored. Celebrities and officers of the 
various teams in the American and National 
leagues are shown prior to each game. 



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Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1958 



The Flying Dutchman 

Credit Kentucky with another masterpiece 
of administration of the 1958 Kentucky High 
School Basketball Tournament. It was a 
classic in all respects. The officiating was 
good, the sportsmanship of the fans was 
commendable, and the social aspect was such 
that everybody enjoyed seeing everybody else 
again after a year's separation. 

The whole tournament was such that 
everybody was in a festive, holiday mood, 
things progressed smoothly and the mem- 
bers of every team, including the State 
champion, St. Xavier, and the runner-up, 
Daviess County, conducted themselves in 
gentlemanly fashion, bringing glory to their 
communities and to our Commonwealth. 

The Dutchman rushed away from the 
finals to Indianapolis at the invitationn of 
Commissioner L. V. Philhps and his deputy, 
Bob Hinshaw. The Indiana classic at the 
Butler Fieldhouse also saw such dignitaries 
in attendance as H. V. Porter and Cliff 
Fagan, the Secretary and Assistant Secretary 
of the National Federation of State High 
School Athletic Associations. 

One thing that amazes the Dutchman is 
how these pros, Ted Sanford and L. V. 
Phillips, along with their assistants, Joe 
Billy Mansfield and Bob Hinshaw, can be so 
relaxed when administering such important 
state-wide classics. It is an achievement 
which many of us prone to ulcers may well 
attempt to copy. 

As the final chapter is written on Ken- 
tucky basketball, the Dutchman salutes the 
schools from the North to the South to the 
East to the West of Kentucky for good, hard 
basketball play backed up with outstanding 
sportsmanship from all areas. 

Bill Harrell, well known over Kentucky in 
athletic circles, writes that Coach "Aggie" 
Sale deserves an orchid for his fine treat- 
ment in supplying cokes at half-time for of- 
ficials, and hamburgers after the ball games 
are over. Bill goes on to say that all of the 
coaches in the Bluegrass area have been fine 
to officials. Some of those who stand out in 
his mind are Leon Kingsolver and Jim Pick- 
ens of Danville, Claude Logan of Elkhorn, 
Letch Norton of Clark County, Homer 
Bickers of Frankfort, and Bobby Barlow of 
Scott County. 

To further emphasize sportsmanship, 
Coach Sonny Hubbs of Sedalia brings glory 
to his Sedalia High School by taking time 
to write a congratulatory letter to Amos 



Teague and Bob Forsythe for the fine job 
of officiating done for his team during the 
year. And so it goes, with Kentucky again 
meriting the title it is so proud of, "The 
Sportsmanship Capitol of the Nation." 

The annual dinner of the KHSAA sche- 
duled for April 10 will honor one of the most 
tremendous game guys ever selected to re- 
ceive the Flying Dutchman Award. John J. 
Stewart will succeed the Game Guy winner of 
1957, Danny Duncan, of Hazel, as the 1958 
representative of all of Kentucky's Game 
Guys. John, who is a student at the Long- 
fellow School in Louisville and a product of 
the City Division of Recreation's basketball 
program, won because he recognizes no handi- 
caps. 

Born with no hands and only part of one 
leg, he has a steel peg leg from the knee down. 
He runs, jumps, shoots and dribbles like any 
other boy. Besides basketball, he plays tennis 
and is a great fisherman. 

Harold S. Sauter, his coach, is the recipient 
of The Flying Dutchman's Corn Cob Pipe of 
Honor Award for the interest and help he 
gave to this young fellow. Harold will be 
The Flying Dutchman's guest at the dinner 
along with Bill Long, the Athletic Director, 
and Bill Moore, the Superintendent of Louis- 
ville's Recreation Department. Jack Dawson, 
member of the Board of Control for the 
Louisville area, will make the presentation 
of the award to Game Guy John Stewart. 

It is unusual for more than one Corn Cob 
Pipe Award to be made in one month, but 
two more had to be dispatched this time to 
Berea's Oscar Gunkler and Somerset's Roy 
Thompson. Oscar was recommended by a 
half-dozen people for his leadership in pro- 
viding wholesome physical education and 
recreation programs for young people of his 
area. It was "Tater" Combs who recom- 
mended Roy Thompson because of his un- 
selfish services in the Somerset Booster Club, 
his work in Boy Scouting and for his count- 
less efforts to bring Babe Ruth Baseball to 
the Somerset area. 

When you come to Louisville for KEA, 
The Flying Dutchman invites you all to be his 
guests at the first recreational College of 
Fishing ever offei-ed in the country. The 
Land 0' Lakes, which is just outside Jeffer- 
sontown, will be the scene of the Fishing 
College where boys and girls of Louisville 
and Jefferson County who are off from 
school will be taught all kinds of fishing. 
College degrees such as Bachelor, Master and 
Doctor of Fishing will be conferred on the 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1958 



Page Nine 



1958 State Basketball Tournament Statistics 

Average Score: For Winners: 66.7; For Losers: 53.4. Total for both: 120.1 per game 

Average No. Personal Fouls (fouls by A plus fouls by B) 22 per game 

Average No. Technical Fouls (fouls by A plus fouls by B) per game 

Total No. Free Throw Attempts (per. and T. for all Games) 645. Successful 62% 

Total No. Times necessary for Official to warn about actionless game: total 

Average No. times per game a player committed 5 Personals: .87 per game 

Averaged No. charged time-outs (total for both teams) : 5.69 per game 

DATA COLLECTED BY FIRST STATISTICIAN 

Average No. (a) Personal fouls made by players while on Offense 2.5 per game 

Average No. (b) Cases of traveling (include illegal dribble) : 6.5 per game 

Average No. (c) Times 2 throws were given unsuccessful thrower: 7.1 per game 

Average No. (d) Times a foul resulted in a bonus penalty: 8 per game 

% of times 1st throw in (d) was successful: 63.5% 

%of 2nd throws which were successful: 71.3% 

Average No. (e) Field goals (both teams) : 45.75 per game 

% scored without ball touching backboard: 55.8% 

Average No. (f) Times per game there was infraction of Rule 9-10: 

At player's own basket: per game 

At opponent's basket: per game 

Average over-all time from first toss to final gun: 1 hr., 10 min. 
DATA COLLECTED BY SECOND STATISTICIAN 

Average No. (a) Jump ball situations (include center jumps) : 10 per game 

(1) Times above jumps followed held ball: .87 per game 

(2) Times jump ball rules were violated. .12 per game 

Average No. (b) Throw-ins from end of court (Do not include 

throw-in after any goal) : 13 per game 

Average No. (c) Throw-ins from side: 11.2 per game 

Average No. (d) Violations of 3-second lane rule: .81 per game 

Average No. (e) Violations of free throw rule 9-1 : .50 per game 

Average No. (f) Times ball remained alive after unsuccessful free throw: 10.1 per game 

% Times in (f) the free throw rebound was recovered by defense: 65.3% 



young Isaac Waltons. 

This will be a new kind of college where 
the classroom is the rolling hillsides by the 
side of beautiful lakes where students really 
enjoy their subject. 

Come on out to the College of Fishing dur- 
ing KEA. 



BOARD MEMBERS RE-ELECTED 

(Continued from Page One) 

Church. He is a member of the Kentucky 
Education Association ; the Kentucky As- 
sociation for Health, Physical Education, and 
Recreation ; and the Kentucky Coaches As- 
sociation. 

Mr. Dawson is a native of Nelson County, 
where he attended the Bloomfield High 
School and started his football career. While 
he was still in high school, the family moved 
to Louisville where Jack entered duPont 
Manual and played three years of football 
for that school. He attended Georgetown Col- 



lege from 1926 to 1930, during which time 
he played football and was a member of the 
track team. 

Mr. Dawson spent one year at Jackson, 
Kentucky, as coach of football and basket- 
ball. In 1931 he became coach of all sports at 
Fern Creek High School, and he continued 
in that position until 1935, at which time he 
became principal. He remained at Fern Creek 
until 1950, except for three years spent in 
the Navy from 1942 to 1945. After he re- 
turned from the Navy, he attended the Uni- 
versity of Louisville where he received his 
M.A. degree. In 1950 he became principal of 
the Eastei'n High School. In October of 1955 
he accepted his present position with the 
Jefferson County Board of Education. 

For several years Mr. Dawson was a regis- 
tered football official with the K.H.SA.A. 
He had played semi-professional football for 
three years. He is a member of the K.E.A. 
and the N.E.A. He is a Baptist, and a member 
of the St. Matthews Rotary Club. 



Pagre Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1958 



Monticello— Fourth Place Winner 
1958 State Basketball Tournament 




(Left to Right) Billy Ray Foister, Aaron Stringer, Larry Ledbetter, Jim Morris, Ray Ram- 
sey, Donald Frye, Gene Pendleton, Fred Frye, Don Bridgeman, Kay Bridgeman. 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association met at the 
K.H.S.A.A. Building, Lexington, on Friday 
morning, March 21, 1958. The meeting was 
called to order by President Russell William- 
son at 9:15 with all Board members and Com- 
missioner Theo. A. Sanford present. 

Louis Litchfield moved, seconded by W. H. 
Crowdus, that the reading of the minutes of 
the February 1st meeting be waived, since 
the members of the Board had received copies 
of these minutes. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

The Commissioner reported that Directors 
W. H. Crowdus and Jack Dawson had been 
re-elected to membership on the Board of 
Control for a period of four years, beginning 
July 1, 1958, to represent respectively Sec- 
tions 3 and 4. 

There was a discussion of possible pro- 
posals to be submitted by the Board of Con- 
trol to the forthcoming Delegate Assembly 
of the K.H.S.A.A. The Commissioner was 
authorized to submit the following proposals 
as Board proposals: 

Proposal I — The Board of Control proposes 
that By-Law 4 be amended to read as fol- 
lows : "A contestant becomes ineligible on his 



nineteenth birthday, with the following ex- 
ceptions: 1) If a .student becomes nineteen 
years of age on or after September 1, he is 
eligible to compete in football for the re- 
mainder of that season; and 2) If a student 
becomes nineteen years of age on or after 
December 1, he is eligible to compete in all 
sports for the remainder of that school year." 

Proposal II — The Board of Control pro- 
poses that the following be added as para- 
graph 11 of Article IV, Section 3-d of the 
K.H.S.A.A. Constitution: "Have authority 
to set up a plan for determining a state 
championship in football." 

Proposal III — The Board of Control and 
the State Track Committee propose that the 
following be added to Track Rule IX and to 
the second paragraph of Track Rule XII: 
"Five participants may be named to a relay 
team, any four of whom may be used in a 
heat or the finals." 

The Commissioner stated that he had been 
in correspondence with Mr. George L. Moss, 
Executive Vice President of the First Na- 
tional Bank, Henderson, concerning the K.H.- 
S.A.A. Annuity Trust Fund account and the 
transferring of the assets of this account to 
the K.H.S.A.A. Mr. Moss stated that it will be 
be proper for the bank to make such a trans- 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1958 



Page Eleven 



TABULATION OF VOTES ON HIGHEST RATED OFFICIALS - 1958 STATE TOURNAMENT 

Listed below are the tabulations of votes on the thirteen officials who received the 
highest ratings by coaches of the sixteen teams which participated in the recent State 
High School Basketball Tournament. Each coach voted on six Certified officials in the 
order of his preference, the official whose name was listed first by the coach receiving six 
points, the second official five points, etc. This is the method which has been used for 
many years by the Board of Control and the Commissioner in selecting State Tournament 
officials. The schools given below are not listed in order by regions nor are they listed 
in the order of the tournament bracket. 



Official 



ABCDEFGHIJKLMNOP TOTAL 



Ralph Mussman_ 2 
George Conley __ 

"Doc" Ferrell 3 

Charlie Irwin 

Ben Edelen 

Roy Winchester- 
Foster "Sid" Meade 4 
Milford Wells --_ 

James Baker 

Robert McLeod _ 

Roy Settle 1 

Warren Cooper _ 
D. Longenecker _ 



29 
27 
22 
22 
21 
19 
18 
17 
13 
13 
13 
12 
12 



fer contingent upon its receiving a copy of 
the resolution passed by the Board of Control 
requesting such transfer. W. B. Jones moved, 
seconded by K. G. Gillaspie, that the follow- 
ing resolution be adopted by the Board of 
Control and that a copy of it be sent to the 
First National Bank of Henderson. 

"WHEREAS the K.H.S.A.A. Annuity 
Trust Fund agreements entered into by and 
between Theo. A. Sanford, J. B. Mansfield, 
the Board of Control of the K.H.S.A.A. and 
the First National Bank of Henderson, Ken- 
tucky, have been terminated by the agree- 
ment of all parties concerned, 

NOW BE IT RESOLVED that the Board 
of Control of the K.H.S.A.A. requests the 
First National Bank of Henderson, Kentucky, 
to pay over to the Kentucky High School 
Athletic Association any cash balance on 
hand in the Annuity Trust Fund, and to 
transfer any bonds or other holdings to the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association." 

The motion was carried unanimously. 

Cecil A. Thornton moved, seconded by 
Robert Forsythe, that Edgar McNabb be 
named Delegate and Travis Combs Alternate 
to the 1958 meeting of the National Federa- 
tion Football Committee. The motion was car- 
ried unanimously. 

W. H. Crowdus moved, seconded by Jack 
Dawson, that all bills of the Association, be- 
ginning February 1, 1958, and ending March 
20, 1958, be allowed. The motion was carried 



unanimously. 

The Board was then called to order in its 
capacity as Board of Directors of the K.H.- 
S.AA. Protection Fund. 

Secretary-Treasurer Sanford presented a 
list of claims which had been paid by the 
Protection Fund since February 1, 1958, the 
total amount of these claims being $4,647.48. 
Cecil A. Thornton moved, seconded by Louis 
Litchfield, that the claims as presented by 
the Secretary-Treasurer of the Protection 
Fund be allowed. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

There being no further business, the meet- 
ing adjourned. 



Hazard Cheerleaders 

Cheerleaders representing the Hazard 
High School were first place winners in the 
fourth annual competition for the Cheer- 
leaders' Cup, awarded by K.A.P.O.S. The 
runner-up honors went to the Clark County 
High School, with honorable mention to the 
Daviess County High School. The presenta- 
tion was made by K.H.S.A.A. President Rus- 
sell Williamson during an award ceremony 
following the final game of the 1958 State 
High School Basketball Tournament. The 
cheerleaders were judged on the basis of a 
rating schedule which included ability, 
sportsmanship, good conduct and grooming. 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR APRIL, 1958 



1958 ANNUAL MEETING 

(Continued from Pase One) 
PROPOSAL IV 

Ass't. Prin. Henry F. Pryse (Mercer Coun- 
ty) proposes that the first sentence of By- 
Law 22 be amended to read as follows : "Mem- 
ber schools shall use registered officials in 
all "A" and "B" team football and basket- 
bail games." 

PROPOSAL V 

Sr. M. Judith, Prin. (Holy Cross), proposes 
that the Commissioner have authority to 
waive the penalty of K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 5, 
Section 4, the "preceding semester rule," if a 
student has been unable to comply with the 
attendance provisions of the rule because of 
illness or accident. 

PROPOSAL VI 

Prin. Damon Ray (Glendale) and five ad- 
ministrators and coaches (Perkins, Alton, 
Goodman, Riddle, Redmon) propose that Ar- 
ticle IV, Section 1, of the K.H.S.A.A. Con- 
stitution be amended by substituting "six- 
teen" for "eight", and that the following be 
substituted for the first sentence of Article 
IV, Section 2-a: "Members of the Board of 
Control shall be elected for a period of four 
years by vote of the principals of member 
schools in each region (Basketball Regions 
1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 
16)." 



K. A. P. O. S. NEWS 

Mrs. Ashley Parham., Pep Club Sponsor 
at Muhlenberg Central High School, sends 
some interesting information concerning 
plans which were put into effect during the 
16th District Basketball Tournament. Mrs. 
Parham gave credit for the activities to the 
entire personnel of the school, in coopera- 
tion with Prin. Spear and Coach Stokes. Mrs. 
Parham outlined "a few major details" as 
follows : 

1. To more thoroughly prepare our stu- 
dent body and particularly the pep club, we 
compiled a list of sportsmanship rules and 
gave each student a copy. 

2. The rules mentioned were discussed at 
the next regular meeting of the club after 
they were formulated. 

3. The "B" team cheerleaders were ap- 
pointed as ushers. They wear uniforms and 
are branded with an usher band. 

4. At half-time the officials are served 
cokes ; after the games they receive sand- 
wiches, drinks, and fruit. 

5. School boys are serving as patrols to 
assist in pai-king cars. 



6. Banisters were built 36" tall to divide 
gym for visitors. They were draped in ap- 
propriate school colors. 

7. Banners are displayed for each team. 

8. A thirty-foot "Welcome Visitors" sign 
was placed at front of gym. 

9. Each evening the Andy Anderson 
American Legion Post presents the American 
flag in appropriate ceremony as the school 
band plays the National Anthem. 

10. Various signs to aid visitors are prop- 
erly posted. 

11. Concession stands are set up in corri- 
dors of adjoining buildings. 

12. Press and local radio stations each 
have booths. 



K.F.H.S.G. S.A.NEWS 

Morton Junior High School 

Lexington, Kentucky 

The club for our girls at Morton Junior 
High is called the Girls' Athletic Association. 
Our school is co-educational and we have ap- 
proximately 525 students enrolled. Our club 
is onen to all girls in the 7th, 8th, and 9th 
grades. 

We have a constitution and the club meets 
once each week. We have been playing soccer 
and will conclude this by playing University 
High School on November 13. The girls in 
the club decide upon their own program 
which does not necessarilv have to follow 
what is being taught in their regular gym 
classes. 

Our G.A.A. is financed by the membership 
dues collected each vear. The girls made this 
decision and we feel it is a good one. 

At present we have the usual club of- 
ficers but hope to have team managers for 
each sDort in the near future. 

We feel that the G.A.A. 'olays an import- 
ant part in our junior high school girls' 
school life. Thev are given the opportunity 
to iDlav both with eirls of their own ability 
and with more hierhly skilled girls. They are 
fiven the chance to take the skills they have 
learned in their classes and put them into 
practice and to have fun with them. We feel 
that our G.A.A. also gives the girls an op- 
portunity to make new friends. 

— Joan Winkler, Sponsor. 



Correction 

In the March issue of the ATHLETE, the 
Benham High School was listed as having 33 
Good ratings and 4 Fair under the heading 
of "Crowd". These ratings should have been 
33 Excellent, 4 Good. 



We ShipThb Day You BuV" 

HUNT'S ATHLETE GOODS CO., Inc. 

103 ^ PHONES — 104 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

IT'S PLAY TIME 



Outdooi- playground programs will be conducted in many schools during 
summer months. 

Our stock is complete on all types of playground and play time equip- 
ment. 

Try our "WE SHIP THE DAY YOU BUY" service on : 

Basketballs 

Basketball goals 
Volleyballs 

Volleyball nets and posts 
Playground balls of all sizes 
Softballs and Softball bats 
Badminton racquets, shuttlecocks 
Nets and complete badminton sets 

Regulation horseshoes in steel and rubber 
Shuffleboard sets and supplies 
Tennis racquets, nets and balls 

If you plan to have a baseball in connection with your recreation program, 
we have a complete stock of uniforms, shoes, bats, balls and gloves in 
Little League, Babe Ruth League and regulation sizes. 

Please write or call for complete information and prices, and our salesmen 
will be glad to call or give you any information and assistance you may 
need. 

Thanks to our many friends and customers who visited us in Louisville 
during the 1958 K.E.A. Convention. It was nice to have you and we ap- 
preciate the nice business that you gave us for the present spring and 
summer season as well as the coming fall and winter season of football 
and basketball. 



Hunt's Athletic Goods Co. 

INCDRPDRATED 

Phone 103 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

THE LARGEST EXCLUSIVE ATHLETIC HOUSE IN THE SOUTH 





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UTCLIFFE CP 

LOUISVILLE 1, KENTUCK/Y 




High School Athfefe 



TRINITY HIGH SCHOOL SWIMMING TEAM 
KENTUCKY CLASS "B'' CHAMPION - - 1958 





(Left to Right) Front Row: Capt. T. Brian, T. McGuire, D. Clements, M. DeWitt. Second 
Row: H. Bellows, M. Hines, T. Waldeyer, B. Sattich, J. Struck, C. Hoskins, Mgr. R. Causick. 
Third Row: Coach R. Wald, K. Elliott, M. Meredith, D. Finnegan, S. Monohan, J. Schildt, D. 
Kute. Not in picture: R. Panther. 



Official Organ of the KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETIC ASSN. 

MAY - 13 58 




WAGSENER H. S. SWIMMING TEAM— CLASS "C" CHAMPION— 1958 




(Left to Right) Front Row: Steve Reskoe, Bill Irion, Phil Thumphfeller. Second Row: Dan 
Schmidtz, John Abbott, Tony Miniea, Charles Farmer. 




Frank 
him mana; 
22, 1958. 



J. Ogden (second row, fifth from left) had a large group of capable assistants to help 
;e the Class "A" State High School Swimming Meet, held in Lexington on February 



The Kentucky High School Athlete 

Official Organ of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 



VOL. XX— NO. 10 



MAY, 1958 



$1.00 Per Year 



MINUTES OF THE ANNUAL MEETING 



The forty-first annual meeting of the 
Kentucky High School Athletic Association 
was held at the Brown Hotel. Louisville, on 
Thursday afternoon, April 10, 1958. 

President Russell Williamson called the 
meeting to order at 2:30, and asked Com- 
missioner Theo. A. Sanford to call the roll 
of delegates. Fifty-six regularly elected dele- 
gates or alternates answered the roll call. 
The following delegates were seated in the 
absence of the delegates or alternates from 
their respective districts : Jarvis Parsley, D. 
38 ; Clinton B. Hammons, D. 50 ; H. G. Penny- 
cuff, D. 56; Howard C. Yates, D. 60: Carl 
Genito, D. 61 ; Jack Fultz, D. 63. 

Joe Ohr moved, seconded by John Robin- 
son, that the minutes of the 1957 annual 
meeting of the Association, which had been 
sent previously to all member schools, be 
approved without being read. The motion 
was carried unanimously. 

Commissioner Sanford then gave a report 
on the activities of the Association during 
the 1957-58 school year. Edgar McNabb 
moved, seconded by J. C. Cantrell, that the 
report of the Commissioner be accepted. 
The motion was carried unanimously. 

President Williamson announced that W. 
H. Crowdus and Jack Dawson had been re- 
elected to membership on the Board of Con- 
trol for a four-year period, beginning July 1, 
1958, to represent Sections 3 and 4 respect- 
ively. 

President Williamson stated that consider- 
ation of the proposals was the next order of 
business. 

McCoy Tarry moved, seconded by Clinton 
Hammons, that Proposal I, providing that a 
contestant shall become ineligible on his 
nineteenth birthday, with certain exceptions, 
be tabled. The motion was can-ied. 

Harold Hunter moved, seconded by Edgar 
McNabb, that Proposal II, providing that the 
board of Control have authority to set up a 
plan for determining a state championship 
in football, be adopted. The motion was 
carried. 

George Sadler moved, seconded by Joe 



Duke, that Proposal III, making certain 
changes in the Track Rules to allow five par- 
ticipants to be named to a relay team, any 
four of whom may be used, be adopted. The 
motion was carried. 

McCoy Tarry moved, seconded by Charles 
Norris, that Proposal IV, providing that reg- 
istered officials be used in both "A" and "B" 
team football and basketball games, be tabled. 
The motion was carried. 

McCoy Tarry moved, seconded by Tom 
Jeffries, that Proposal V, giving the Com- 
missioner authority to waive the penalty of 
the "preceding semester rule," if a student 
has been unable to comply with the attend- 
ance provisions of the rule because of illness 
or accident, be tabled. The motion was car- 
ried. 

Jim Ownby moved, seconded by J. M. Mar- 
tin, that Proposal VI. providing that the 
Board of Control be increased in number 
from eight to sixteen members, be tabled. 
The motion was carried. 

Joe Ohr asked the permission of the Dele- 
gate Assembly to submit a proposal concern- 
ing the possible change of dates of the dis- 
trict, regional, and state basketball tourna- 
ments. James Lynch moved, seconded by H. 
G. Pennycuff, that l^'^r. Ohr be allowed to 
submit his proposal. The vote was 31-19 in 
favor of the motion, which was not the nec- 
essar.v two-thirds required for considera- 
tion of the proposal from the floor. J. C. Can- 
trell then asked for a roll call on the motion, 
which was allowed by President Williamson. 
Upon the roll call the motion carried by a 
vote of 42-20. Joe Ohr proposed that "the 
week prior to" be substituted for "on" in the 
fourth line of Tournament Rule I. George 
Claiborne moved, seconded by Howard Yates, 
that Mr. Ohr's proposal be adopted. There 
was a general discussion of the proposal. 
Clinton Hammons moved, seconded by John 
Robinson, that the proposal be tabled. The 
motion was carried. 

There being no further business. President 
Williamson declared the meeting adjourned. 
(Continued on Page Eight) 



Page Two 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1958 



MAY, 1958 VOL. XX— NO. 10 

Published monthly, except June and July, by the Kentucky 

High School Athletic Association. 

Office of Publication, Lexington, Ky. 

Entered as second-class matter in the post office at Lexinffton, 

Kentucky under the act of March 3, 1879. 

Editor THEO. A. SANFORD 

Assistant Editor J. B. MANSFIELX) 

Lexington, Ky. 
BOARD OF CONTROL 

President Russell Williamson (19B6-60), Inez 

Vice-President Louis Litchfield (1957-61), Marion 

Directors — W. B. Jones (1957-61) Somerset: W. H. Crowdua 
(1954-58), Franklin: Jack Dawson (1954-58), Louisville: 
Robert P. Forsythe (1955-69), Greenville; K. G. Gillaspie 
(1955-69), Georgetown; Cecil A. Thornton (1956-60), Harlan. 

Subscription Rates $1.00 Per Year 



Jrom the Ci 



ommissionei s 



Offi 



ice 



REPORTS PAST DUE 

1. 1957-58 Basketball Participation List 
(Eligibility) . 

2. School's Report on Basketball Officials. 

3. Official's Report on Schools — Basket- 
ball. 



Fines for Late Reports 

More than 190 member schools had not 
filed their reports on basketball officials and 
their basketball participation (eligibility) 
lists for the 1957-58 season when this issue 
of the ATHLETE went to press. Approxi- 
mately 600 basketball officials have not filed 
their reports on member schools. The Board 
of Control has established a fine of $5.00 for 
both schools and officials delinquent with 
their reports. A deadline of June 15 has been 
set for the filing of all reports required un- 
der Association rules. Officials who have not 
worked any games should notify the K.H.S. 
A.A. office accordingly. Such notification is 
considered a report. 

State Track Committee 

The forthcoming State High School Track 
Meet, which is scheduled to be held in Lex- 
ington on May 16-17, will be managed by 
Ath. Dir. John Heber of the Henry Clay High 
School, Lexinsrton, Chairman of the State 
Track Committee. Other members of the 
committee are: Preston Holland, Murray; 
Don Shelton, Henderson ; Turner Elrod, 
Bowling Green ; Joe Brummett. Danville ; Ed- 
die Weber, Louisville; Joe Curtsinger, Louis- 
ville ; John Schaar, . Bellevue ; Bob Miller, 
Newport; Herman Bush, Barbourville ; Ar- 
thur Mullins, Elkhorn City ; and Ernie Chat- 
tin, Ashland. These regional manangers will 
assist Mr. Heber in conducting the state 
meet. 



Tennis Tournaments 

Five regional tournaments will be held in 
tennis, one more than last year. There will 
be two tournaments for the Louisville and 
Jefferson County schools, both managed by 
Coach Emmett Goranflo of the Eastern High 
School. The other three tournaments will 
be managed by Coach Ted Hornback of 
Bowling Green, Coach Eugene Huff of Lex- 
ington, and Coach Roger Klein of Bellevue. 
The tentative date for the regional tourna- 
ments is May 12. The State Tennis Tourna- 
ment will be held in Louisville on May 19- 
20, and will be managed by Coach Goranflo. 
Golf Tournaments 

The seven regional orolf tournaments, 
scheduled to be held on May 21, will be man- 
aged by the following men: Ath. Dir. L. L. 
McGinnis, Owensboro High School ; Ath. Dir. 
Elvis Donaldson, Bowling Green High School ; 
Ass't. Prin. Oz Johnson, Valley High School; 
Coach Charles Crum. Dixie Heights High 
School; Supt. John Robinson. Danville City 
Schools; Mr. Julian Pitzer, Middlesboro; and 
Prin. Oran Teater, Paintsville High School. 
The State Golf Tournament will be held at 
Paintsville on May 27-28. and will be man- 
aged by Mr. Teater. Princioals who have not 
received their regional entry blanks should 
write to their respective managers for these 
forms. 



1957-58 Annual Report 

(Presented to Delegate As<5emblv) 

Four hundred sixtv-two schools ioined the 
Association during 1957-58. This is twenty- 
six more than were enrolled in 1956-57. One 
hundred thirty-nine schools had eleven-man 
football teams, and thirteen plaved six-man 
football. This is an increase of nineteen 
eleven-man teams over 1956-57, an increase 
of two in six-man football. 

Financial renorts filed by the sixteen reg- 
ional basketball tournament managers show 
total receipts of $109,253.74. This is anoroxi- 
mately the same figure as was shown by the 
1957 reports. Receints on the sixty-two dis- 
trict basketball tournaments amounted to 
$209,512.79. which was an at)T3roximate in- 
crease of $47,600.00 over 1957 receipts. Re- 
ceints from ticket sales at the State Basket- 
ball Tournament, exclusive of refunds, will 
exceed $114,000.00. Additional receipts from 
the tournament urogram will bring total 
tournament receints to apnroximatelv $117,- 
000.00. Profit to the Association on the tour- 
nament should be annroximatelv $88,000.00. 
A few tournament bills are still being receiv- 
( Continued on Page Twelve) 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1958 



Page Three 



■rsity (1:06.8); 
)8.4) ; Albers, St. 
University (1 :- 



58.6 



1958 Kentucky State High School Swimming Meet 

University of Kentucky Coliseum, Lexington, Kentucky, Classes B & C, April 12, 1958 

CLASS "B" 
Results 

Trinity 62 

Highlands 38 

Fort Knox 32 

University 20 

Berea Foundation I8J/2 

St. Joseph Prep 18 

Newport 9^ 

1. 50 Yard Freestyle — 

Heat No. 1 : Fiske, Berea Foundation 
( :26.9) ; Fisher, Ft. Knox ( :27.2) ; Sattich, 
Trinity ( :27.8) ; Maxson, University 
( :30.4) ; McAtee. Highlands ( :30.4) ; 
Pooley, Newport (:30.6). 

Heat No. 2 : McGuire, Trinity ( :27.6) ; 
Glass, Highlands i. :28.2) ; Hines, Trinity 
( :28.6) ;Berlekamp, Highlands ( :29.8) : 
Russell, University ( :30.6) ; Knapp, High- 
lands (:33.2). 

Heat No. 3 : Brian, Trinity ( :26.7) ; 
Gavigan, St. Joseph ( :27.8) : Switzer, 
University ( :28.3) ; Wespiser, St. Joseph 
( :29.2J ; Baker, Berea Found. ( :31.2) ; 
Yang, Beiea Found. (;34.0). 

Heat No. 4: Gramzow, Ft. Knox 
(:26.4); Hetteberg, Newport ( :26.9) ; 
Karoblis, St. Joseph ( :27.4) ; Taylor, Uni- 
versity (:28.7): Koltak, St. Joseph ( :30.0) ; 
Salstrum, Berea Found. (:31.1). 



1. 



Br 



Finals 

Ft. Knos 



■inity 

Fiske, Berea Found. 

3. Hetteberg, Newport 

6. Karoblis, St. Joseph 

G. Fisher, Ft. Knox 

2. 100 Yard Breaststroke — 

Heat No. 1 : Wehrle, Berea Found. 
(1:22.5); Kute, Trinity (1:24.8); Downie, 
St. Joseph (1:35.91; Black, Highlands 
(1:40.5): Purcell, St. Joseph (1:45.7): 
Kinkead, University (2:09.0). 

Heat No. 2: Boone, Highlands 
(1:25.2): Stewart, University (1:27.2); 
Ray, Ft. Knox (1:27.6); Reeves, Univer- 
sity (1:45.8), Lisle, University (1:55.5). 

Heat No. 3: Panther, Trinity (1:17.9) : 
Isham, Ft. Knox (1 :26.3) ; Stambaugh, 
Highlands (1:28.1); Blackman, Berea 
Found. (1:33.0); Osolnik, Berea Found. 
(1 :37.3). 



Heat No. 4 : Clements, Trinity 
(1:17.5); Menendez, St. Joseph (1:28.8); 
Schildt, Trinity (1:29.8); Salstrum, Berea 
Found. (1:56.5); White, St. Joseph 
(2:01.3). 

Clements set a new state record in this 
event with his time of 1:17.5. This is a 
new event. 

Finals 

1. Clements, Trinity 1:18.0 

2. Panther, Trinity 1:18.7 

3. Wehrle, Berea Found, 1:22.5 

4. Kute, Trinity 1:22.8 

5. Boone, Highlands 1:26.3 

6. Isham, Ft. Knox 1:26.9 

3. 100 Yard Backstroke — 

Heat No. 1 : Monohan, Trinity 
(1:14.4); Roberts, Berea Found. (1:22.5); 
Dorsey, Highlands (1:24.3); Stoneburner, 
Highlands (1:25.6); Calloway, University 
(1:39.4). 

Heat No. 2: Roberts, Highlands 
(1:16.8); Harris, University (1:22.9); Sei- 
Eried, Newport (1:25.1); Tekulve, St. Jos- 
eph (1:29.2); Williams, University (2 :- 
07.1). 

Heat No. 3: Fiske, Berea Found, (1:- 
14.2); Hubbard, Ft. Knox (1:16.7); Bel- 
lows, Trinity (1:24.1) ; Yang, Berea Found. 
(1:29.7); Walden, Universtiy (1:32.4). 

Heat No. 4: Goes, Highlands (1:11.1) ; 
Kennel, St. Joseph (1:24.4); Barnhorst, 
St. Joseph (1:28.7) ; McClure, Berea Found. 
(1:48.8): Edmundson, St. Joseph (1:52.4). 
Goes set a new state record in this 
event with his time of 1:11.1, breaking 
the record time of 1:11.4 set by Dick 
Gramzow of Ft. Knox in 1957. 
Finals 

Goes, Highlands 1:11.3 

Fiske. Berea Found. 1 :13.7 

Roberts, Highlands 1 :17.5 

Monohan, Trinity 1:18,0 

Hubbard, Ft. Knox -.. 1 :18.0 

Roberts, Berea Found. 1:23.6 

100 Yard Freestyle — 
Heat No. 1 : Meredith, Trinity ( :59.6) ; 
Finnigan, Trinity 1 :04.8) ; Toberg, St. 
Joseph (1:05.2); Fulmer, Highlands 
(1:09.5); Ripberger, Newport (1:23.7). 

Heat No. 2 : Clarke, Universtiy 
(1:02.6); Smith, Berea Found. (1:04.2): 
Throgmorton. St. Joseph (1 :08.1) : Taylor, 
Highlands (1:11.3); Reeves, University 
(1:19.9) ; Snodgrass. Berea Found. (1:34.2). 



Heat No. 3: Fulmer, Highlands 
(:59.6); Waldeyer, Trinity (1:05.6); 
Brink, Ft.Knox (1 :09.9) ; Bootes, High- 
lands (1:12.5). 

Heat No. 4: " 

(:59.6); Brock, Univ 
Wright, Berea Found. (1 
Joseph (1:09.3); Wade, 
10.5). 

Finals 

1. Grimzow, Ft. Knox . 

2. Fulmer, Highlands . 

3. Meredith, Trinity . 

4. Clarke, University . 

5. Finnigan, Trinity _. 

6. Smith, Berea Found 



00.3 
02.9 
03.5 
04.0 



thi! 



set 
vith hi: 



state record in 
of :58.6. The 
1:00.7, set by 
in 1957. 



record time was 
Wadsworth of Highland: 
Fancy Diving — 

Finals 

Stewart, University 129.85 

McGuire. Trinity 100.20 

McAtee, Highlands 99.30 

Gushing, Ft. Knox 92.60 

Neal, Newport 91.20 

Fisher. Ft. Knox 81.80 

200 Yard Medley Relay- 
Finals 
Trinity (Monohan, Clements, Panther, 

Sattich) 2 :05.1 

Highlands (Goes, Boone, Glass, 

McAtee) 2 :07.3 

Ft.Knox (Hubbard, Isham, Fisher, 

Brian) 2:12.4 

St. Joseph (Kennel, Menendez, To- 
berg, Barnhorst) 2:16.4 

Berea Found. (Roberts, Wehrle, 

Wright, Smith) 2:16.9 

University (Taylor, Harris, Stuart, 

Wadel 2:22.2 

The 



Trinity team set a new 
record in this event with its tin 
2:05.1. This is a new event. 
7. 200 Yard Freestyle Relay — 

Finals 
1. Trinity (Meredith, Finnegan, 



state 



St. Joseph (Karoblis, Throgmorton, 

Wespiser, Gavigan) 1 :53,2 

University (Switzer, Reeves, Brock, 
Clarke) 1 :53.9 



TEAM SCORING— Class "B'^ 















>. 


a 
















ca 










-o2 


0) 






T3« 


[JHJJ 




TEAM 


"25 


« m 


1^ 2 


C3 >i 






T3K 








^S 


!-J 


!^| 


^^ 


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"ca a 




gfe 


§1 


§1 




§s 


§5 

(M m 


o o 


Trinity 


5 


15 


3 


6 


5 


14 


14 


62 


Highlands 





2 


11 


5 


4 


10 


6 


38 




8 



1 



2 



7 
3 


4 

7 


8 

9 


2 

8 


32 




20 


Berea Found 


3 '2 


4 


6 


1 





4 





181/2 




2 














6 


10 


18 


Newport 


3% 











2 





5 


9V2 



Page Four 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1958 



TEAM SCORING— Class "C" 



TEAM 




o 3 
locq 


50 Yard 
Backstroke , 




200 Yd. 

Freestyle 

Relay 


Total 
Points 




10 
7 
5 


12 
7 
3 


12 
7 
3 


9 
8 
5 


14 
8 
10 


57 




37 




26 







4. Highlands (Roberts, Taylor, Berle- 
kamp. Fulmer) 1:55.3 

5. Ntwpoit (Hetteberg, Lienhardt, Simp- 
son, Thacker) 1:65.2 

a Ft. Knox (Snedeker. Ray. Boudreaux, 

CubhingI 2:00.6 

The Trinity team set a new record in 
the second heat of this event with its time 
of 1 :47.5, breaking the old record time of 
1 :50. set bv Highlands in 1957. 

CLASS "C" 
Results 

Wagg'ener 57 

Bellevue 37 

Beechwood 26 

1. 50 Yard Freestyle — 
Finals 

1. Irion, Waggoner :27.1 

2. Giles, Bellevue :27.2 

3. Kingsbury, Beechwood :27.5 



Peskoe, Waggener :27,9 

Bevis, Bellevue :29.9 

Hill, Beechwood :30.0 

50 Yard Butterfly- 
Finals 

Abbott. Waggener 

Waggener 



Be 



28.8 
30.0 
30.2 
36.0 



Bellevue ^, 
Allen, Beechwood 

Castleman, Beechwood :44.5 

Abbott set a new state record in this 
event with his time of :28.8. This mark 
breaks the record time of :32.4. set by 
Ronnie Mendell of Bellevue in 1957. 
3. 50 Yard Backstroke — 
Finals 

1. Abbott, Waggener 

2. Miniea. V\'aggener 

3. Boeh, Bellevue — 



Rhe 



elle 



Southgate. Beechwood 



36.4 
39.3 



Elo, Beechwood :40.G 

Abbott set a new state record in this 
ent with his time of :31.2. This mark 
eaks the record time of :33.6, set by 
ck Gramzow of Ft. Knox in 1956. 
Fancy Diving — 

Finals 

Irion, Waggener 86:95 

Cavana, Bellevue 81.80 

Shook, Beechwood 66.20 

Giles. Bellevue 64.00 

Trumpfeller. Waggener 62.20 

Southgate, Beechwood 57.40 

200 Yard Freestyle Relay — 

Finals 
Waggener (Miniea, Schmitz. Peskoe, 

Irion) 1 :53.3 

Beechwood (Hill. Cotton, Shook, 

Kingsbury) 1 :53.4 

Bellevue (Smith, Cavana, Rece. 
Bevis) 2 :01.2 



K. A. P. O. S. Renders Service 

K.A.P.O.S., The Kentucky Association of 
Pep Organization Sponsors, continues to 
render a good service to the member schools 
of the Kentucky High School Athletic As- 
sociation. This organization, established in 
1955, has done much to raise the standards 
of cheerleading in the state. 

Mrs. Stella S. Gilb, Executive Secretary 
of K.A.P.O.S., University of Kentucky, writes 
that those who send in their membership 
fees now will help the organization in financ- 
ing many projects, sending notices concern- 
ing meetings, mailing new materials to help 
cheerleaders, etc. She asks that the $1.00 
membership fee for the coming school year 
be sent to her at this time. The membership 
card entitles the sponsor to be admitted free 
to all games, other than tournament games, 
where the sponsor is serving in the capacity 
of chaperone for a game. 

The K.A.P.O.S. committee selected the 
Hazard cheerleaders, pictured above, as be- 
ing first place winners in the fourth annual 
competition for the Cheerleaders' Cup, held 
during the State Basketball Tournament. In- 
struction sheets to those who .judged in the 
contest listed seven areas which were to be 
considered. They were: appearance (neat- 




HAZARD CHEERLEADERS 

(Left to Right) Dianne Robinson, Mickey Robinson, 
Melva Linville, Linda Stevens. 



ness, good grooming), ability to execute the 
yells, ability and effort displayed in control 
over own rooters, appropriateness of the 
choice of yells, conduct while in uniform, pep 
and enthusiasm, and sportsmanship (toward 
opponents and officials). Excellent, Good, 
Fair and Poor ratings were given 10-7-5-2 
points respectively. 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL, ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1958 



Page Five 



The Flying Dutchman 

When John Stewart strode up to the speaker's 
rostrum to receive his award from Jael-; Dawson 
proclaiming- him the Game Guy of 1958, five hundred 
educators, coaches, officials and their wives stood 
to give the handsome twelve-year-old lad an ovation 
which brought smiles to the faces of his parents 
and tears to Johnnie's eyes. 

Seated alongside his coach at the annual K.H.S. 
A. A. dinner, young John Stewart had hundreds of 
admiring eyes focused on him. John was proud, 
Coach Harold Sauter was proud and so was every- 
body connected with the K.H.S. A. A. Well we could 
be! Here was a lad who had overcome so many 
physical handicaps to engage in sports that all of 
us were looking at COURAGE itself. 

As Johnnie thanked the K.H.S. A. A. for its in- 
terest in helping encourage physically handicapped 
young men to engage in sports, there was ample 
reason for us all to be proud of a state-wide ath- 
letic program which is prouj of its champions and 
equally proud of its unsung "Champions of Cour- 
age" who parade before us year after year pro- 
claiming silently that here is an association with a 
heart. 

As the Game Guys go marching on, so, also, 
do those Corn Cob Pipe of Honor winners who are 
great because of their services to their fellow men 
and for what their personal examples mean to 
others. Our Game Guy for the month of May is 
Louisville's Coach W. L. Kean. 

Recommended by Bob Thurman, widely known 
official and sports enthusiast, Coach Kean is a most 
worthy recipient of the Kentucky Thoroughbred 
wearing the Cob Pipe around his neck. W. L., a vet- 
eran of thirty-three years of coaching, is a quiet, 
modest and unassuming little man who has a heart 
as big as all outdoors. 

Coach Kean reflects honor on Louisville's Cen- 
tral High School because he has kept the conduct of 
his players, followers and staff on a high standard. 
He did not win his award because he has coached 
champions. He won it because his contribution to 
character building, leadership and morals has been 
outstanding. So many things contribute to the great- 
ness of Kentucky's school boy athletic program, its 
champions, game guys, cob pipe winners, sports- 
manlike communities and its leaders. Who can tell 
which is most important; they all count. 

Dr. Lyman Ginger, principal speaker at the an- 
nual Association banquet during K.E.A.. must have 
had some of these thoughts in mind as he delivered 
an address which The Dutchman proclaims as educa- 
tional, entertaining and inspirational. Often we get 
so close to the forest we are unable to see the trees. 
The Dutchman wondered as Lyman spoke how many 
of us realized that we were listening to a great man 
and a world leader in the educational field who has 
both feet on the gi'ound. 

Lyman is one of those unusual fellows who 
excels at just about everything attempted. Out- 
standing as a football official, a clinic director, a 
teacher, a board member and as a man, one thing is 
a lead-pipe cinch, that being that the K.H.S.A.A. 
racked up a score when they secured him as the 
banquet speaker. 

It is hard to get off the subject of the annual 
banquet because this is the best we have ever 
attended. Moving the affair up a day was a master 
move on the part of the administrative staff be- 



cause it gave several hundred more a chance to be 
there. The entertainment Jack Dawson lined up 
should help make it even bigger in 1959. The over- 
all leadership noted in the planning is a tribute to 
Ted and Joe. It was just a " wing doodle" of an 
evening! 

Compliments continue to come in, even after 
the season's close, aimed in the direction of both 
coaches and officials. This month we pay tribute 
to "Rock" Reece and Amos Black. Here are two 
great guys. Amos played under The Dutchman's 
officiating back in the Roaring Forties and was a 
fine lad all the way. He was a man when he was still 
a high school boy. The Dutchman seems to re- 
member that he had a heavier beard at sixteen than 
Mansfield has in middle age. 

It is a cinch that this state could not do without 
"Rock" Reese. If "Rock" ever leaves Kentucky, the 
end result will be the same as when Davy Crockett 
left Tennessee and Abraham Lincoln left Kentucky. 
Our Commonwealth would never be the same. Some- 
body ought to recommend Amos and "Rock" for 
the Cob. No two chaps ever deserved one more. Bill 
Harrell, Kentucky Methodist Children's Home, says 
they ai'e true sportsmen. 

With the curtain falling on high school sports 
for 1957-58 and with summer vacations in the offing, 
the next best service Kentucky's educational leaders 
can render their communities is from the recreation- 
al angle. Education and recreation are co-functional. 
The educator has never completely done his job 
until he goes past the school day to help organize 
programs to fill the leisure hours of young men and 
women wholesomely. 

Recreation programs ai-e spinnging up all over 
Kentucky. If you want to see the newest and one 
that is a dandy, just drop in on Paul Walker in 
Bowling- Green. This brand new program is attract- 
ing a lot of attention. Right now Paul is moving 
away out front as one of Kentucky's coming recrea- 
tion directors. 

Your community needs a summer program. If 
you want to get one started you can now get some 
guidance from the state where recent legislation 
was passed to provide a state recreation consultant 
to help the Commonwealth's communities get play- 
ground and youth prog-rams under way. Contact 
George Carr Ganter at the Department of Conserva- 
tion, Frankfort, Kentucky, for additional informa- 
tion relative to recreation for your community. 

As The Dutchman pens his last column until 
Autumn, he is celebrating- another April birthday, 
being born under the sign of Taurus, the Bull. It 
should be said that Taurus in no way affects what 
appears in the monthly articles. Let's go out and 
play some golf. Old Ben! 



Editor's Note: Coach W. L. "Bill" Kean, men- 
tioned above as a winner of the Corn Cob Pipe of 
Honor, died on April 29 at his home, 3306 Grand 
Avenue, Louisville. He was 58. Mr. Kean had been 
head coach of both football and basketball for 33 
years at his school when he turned over the football 
chore in June, 1956 to Dan White, one of his assist- 
ants and a former pupil. Coach Kean's Central High 
School Yellowjackets won five state basketball 
championships in the Old Kentucky High School 
League. The school's basketball teams also won the 
national Negro high school championship four times. 
Besides coaching, Kean officiated professional, col- 
lege, and prep games over the years. 



Page Six 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1958 



Basketball Rules Revisions 
For the Season of 1958-1959 

NOTE: The high degree of satisfaction 
with the type of game which is now being 
played made it unnecessary for the Com- 
mittee to make any major change in penalty 
rules or related sections. The revisions 
which were authorized are in the nature of 
improvements in providing coverage for sit- 
uations which developed during the season 
and further expanding certain regulations 
which were authorized in a very limited way 
for the past season and which proved to be 
successful enough to warrant further de- 
velopment. 

Court Diagram : Because of lack of any 
indication that the free throw lane lines are 
parallel, a slight addition to the measure- 
ments was authorized. It will show that the 
lane lines are 12 feet apart at the end line 
as well as at the free throw line and that 
the measurement is from outside to outside 
of the lines which mark the lane. 

1-5: An insertion in the last sentence will 
make it clear that the space (alley) marks 
are not a part of the lane. Without this in- 
sertion, it might be claimed that it is a vio- 
lation if a player touches one of these marks. 

1-10: An insertion in the first sentence 
will prescribe that the official net is a 12- 
mesh net, i.e., one with 12 loops for attach- 
ing the net to the ring. The second sentence 
will contain a similar insertion to make it 
clear that the official ring has provision for 
12 attachment points. An attempt will be 
made to set up more specific standards con- 
cerning the best length for a net. 

1-12: A discussion of the rule concerning 
color and other characteristics of an official 
ball led to the appointment of a special com- 
mittee to confer with representatives of the 
athletic equipment manufacturers with a 
view to setting more specific standards in 
connection with color and with the depth and 
width of channels which separate the ball 
panels. No change in the present rule was 
authorized. 

3-3: After discussing several proposals 
which would have stopped the clock for all 
violations or for certain listed violations and 
the possible undesirable features which 
might be introduced through such a change, 
the Committee designated this as one of the 
projects to be assigned to the appropriate 
committee for observation and experimenta- 
tion during next season. 

3-4: The note will be revised to indicate 
that while the system of using odd and even 



numbers on light and dark suits is commend- 
able, there is no intention of the Committee 
to make the use of such system mandatory. 

4-10: Last paragraph will be revised to 
make it clear that a proper guarding position 
is often farther away than a reaching dis- 
tance. The 5-seconds held ball rule is to be 
invoked under the outlined circumstances if 
an opponent is within a distance up to 6 feet 
(from feet to feet) from the player who is 
holding or dribbling the ball. 

Also, the width of the area in which the 
5-seconds held ball rule is to be enforced in 
connection with a dribbler is the area from 
the center division line to within about 3 
feet of the top of the free throw circle. As in 
the past, this is an imiginary boundary and 
the official is authorized to estimate its loca- 
tion. The area from the end line to the imag- 
inary line 3 feet outside the top of the circle 
is to be considered reasonable scoring area 
and in certain outlined situations, the drib- 
bler who remains in continuous control is 
expected to advance into this reasonable scor- 
ing area. Also, during certain periods of no 
action as outlined in Rule 10-1 (c), the offen- 
sive team, after being warned, is expected to 
advance the ball into this scoring area within 
a period of about 5 seconds. 

4-18A: The "mid-court area" is to be de- 
fined as that part of the front court extend- 
ing from the division line to a parallel imag- 
inary line 3 feet behind the free throw lane. 
This is for convenience in administering the 
rule to insure reasonable action. 

4-15A : For convenience, an attempt will be 
made to include a definition of a penalty. 

5-2 Ques. (1) : An addition to this section 
or a revised wording of Question (1) will 
make it clear that the outlined procedure to 
be followed when a free thrower is errone- 
ously permitted to make his attempt in the 
wrong basket applies even when there is in- 
terference with the ball in the basket cylind- 
er. CoiTesponding revision will be made in 
the penalty under 9-10 to harmonize with the 
procedure as outlined in 5-2. 

5-7 : In the last sentence of the third para- 
graph, the inadvertent holdover phrase 
"from a false double foul" will be deleted. 
Any slight revision in wording which may 
be necessary because of this deletion will be 
made. 

5-11: Slight revision in wording will be 
made to fit the interpertation which was 
authorized by the Committee. This author- 
ized interpretation is to the effect that each 
team is always entitled to at least one time- 
out without penaly in each extra period. This 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1958 



Page Seven 



applies event hough the team may have been 
penalized for an excess time-out prior to the 
start of such extra period. 

6-3: This section is being studied to de- 
termine whether items (b) and/or (c) are 
unnecessary since they are covered in item 
(e). The second sentence will refer to the 
"two" involved players and to "his" sub- 
stitute. 

7-5 : Last clause will be reworded to make 
it clear that the spot of the throw-in for the 
outlined situations is the spot out of bounds 
nearest where the violation occurred rather 
than "where the ball became dead." At one 
time, the former statement was necessary be- 
cause the back court return violation was for 
the illegal return rather than for illegally 
touching the ball in the back court after such 
return. Under current back court return 
rules, the last clause of 7-5 has been in con- 
flict with the penalty under 9-9. 

8-1 : A slightly revised wording will make it 
clear that it is not permissible for more than 
one player to occupy a designated space 
along the free throw lane. 

9-3: Item (a) will contain the insertion 
"directly" to harmonize with a similar state- 
ment in 7-6. 

9-6: Second sentence may be deleted or 
revised to further discourage Officials from 
considering two acts as being simultaneous. 
Unless there is something about the acts 
which inherently make them simultaneous, 
the Official is expected to determine which 
occurred first. 

9-9: Last sentence of penalty will be re- 
worded to avoid use of the undefined term 
"out of bounds spot" and to harmonize with 
other uses of the term "throw-in." 

10-1- (b) : In the comments or elsewhere, 
it will be emphasized that Official should 
handle the ball in any case where two op- 
ponents are contesting possession of the ball 
when there is to be a throw-in. 

10-1- (c) : This item is being expanded to 
indicate that the Officials shall attempt to 
prevent long periods of comparative inaction 
by warning the teams. In obvious cases, 
where there is no attempt to provide suitable 
action, the Referee is expected to warn the 
teams after approximately 30 seconds. Such 
warning is to be given without stopping the 
clock. It is to be given by a clearly visible 
and/or audible signal and through pointing 
to the team which is responsible for provid- 
ing sufficient action. After such warning has 
been given, the Referee is authorized to pen- 
alize the team which is responsible if it does 
not provide suitable action. If the offense is 



responsible, it is expected that if the defense 
does not choose to advance to insure reason- 
able action, the ball must be moved into rea- 
sonable scoring area, i.e., in advance of the 
imaginary line about 3 feet outside the top 
of the free throw circle within about 5 
seconds. If the defense is responsible, suit- 
able action involves the sending of not less 
than two defensive players into the mid- 
court area with a reasonable attempt to force 
action. If only one offensive player is in the 
mid-court area, it is not necessary for the 
defense to have more than one matching 
player in the area. 

10:3: This will be expanded to make it ap- 
ply to a player who, while legally off the 
court, purposely delays his return to the 
court. 

10-6 : The note will be expanded to author- 
ize Officials to attempt an equitable correc- 
tion of certain listed obvious errors such 
as failure to permit a bonus throw when the 
team is entitled to it or vice versa. Ijimits 
on the time during which such correction is 
practical will be similar to those which are 
now fixed for late discovery of certain in- 
fractions such as a team having a 6th player 
on the court or a team having taken an ex- 
cess time-out. 

10-7: Ques. (1) under the penalty will be 
deleted since the outlined situation is clearly 
covered in the rules statement. 

Comments: First sentence of the state- 
ment about court construction will be revised 
to make it clear that while the over-all gym- 
nasium floor space should be as large as pos- 
sible, it is not intended that high school or 
junior high school courts shall be more than 
84 feet long. Also, it will be made clear that 
the wide lane should be used on all courts, 
including a junior high school court. Where 
space is limited, the wide court will not be a 
handicap if, when necessary, the 3-second 
lane time limit is dispensed with or made to 
apply only to the player who is in control. 

In the comments or in other supplementary 
material, certain guides will be provided for 
officials in the case where the ball is out of 
bounds in possession of a player or some 
other violation occurs with the ball in the 
player's possession. If there is a contest be- 
tween opponents over securing possession of 
the ball, the official is expected to intervene 
and handle the ball. 

OBSERVATION AND EXPERIMENTA- 
TION : Because certain rules have been set 
aside during the past season in some areas, 
the Committee authorized a campaign to 
persuade all groups to adhere to the rules 



Page Eight 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1958 



as written. This applies especially to the fol- 
lowing. Coaches are prohibited from talking 
to or signalling to players or demonstrating 
at a sideline at any time other than during 
an intermission or a time-out which is charg- 
ed to a team. This does not include the period 
during free throws or during an official's 
time-out or during a throw-in. There is no 
provision in the rules which permits a coach 
to request a time-out and no authorization 
for officials to grant it. When an official 
stops the clock for the purpose of examining 
an injured player, the rules require that play 
be resumed immediately after it has been de- 
termined whether the player desires a 
charged time-out. If he requires more time 
than for this decision, the time-out must be 
chai'ged to the team unless the player is re- 
placed. The commonly used jump shot results 
in many cases of illegal foot movement. The 
rules specify the exact movements which are 
permissible. 

The rules specify when, during a free 
throw, players may enter the lane. The prac- 
tice of screening out an adjacent player 
when moving in front of him often involves 
a violation. 

Another research project is an attempt to 
determine whether the first space along the 
free throw lane should be 8 feet instead of 
7 feet and whether the second should be 4 
feet instead of 3 feet. 

— H. V. Porter, Secretary, 

National Basketball Committee 



Baseball Rulings 



ANNUAL MEETING 

(Continued from Page One) 

The dinner meeting of the Association was 
held in the Crystal Ballroom of the Brown 
Hotel at 6:00 P. M., with approximately 500 
delegates and other school officials present. 
Charlie Vettiner, Director of the Jefferson 
County Playground and Recreation Board, 
introduced several young people represent- 
ing the county recreation program, who en- 
tertained the group with singing and danc- 
ing numbers. Director Jack Dawson intro- 
duced John Stewart, a student at the Long- 
fellow School in Louisville, who received the 
1958 Game Guy Award. The boy's parents, 
and his coach, Harold S. Sauter, were also 
presented. Dean Lyman V. Ginger of the 
University of Kentucky College of Educa- 
tion, President of the National Education 
Association, gave the address of the evening. 
The subject of Dr. Ginger's talk was "A Chal- 
lenge to the Profession." Dr. Ginger's talk 
was well received by all present. 



Editor's Note: These rulings do not set aside or modify any rule. 
They are interpretations on some of the early season situations 
which have been presented. 

1. Play: Are any corrections needed for 
the 1958 baseball publications? Ruling: None 
have been reported for the Rules or Case 
Books. In the Baseball Examination the key 
to Part I should be corrected as follows. 
Answer 3 of question 4 is correct. Answer 3 
of question 5 is not correct. In Part II, a 
question might be raised about answer 5 of 
question 10. When a fielder's detached glove 
strikes the ball, ball should probably be de- 
clared retroactively dead if runners do not 
advance 3 bases. This would make it con- 
sistent with other declinable penalties such 
as that for a balk. However, Rule 5 concern- 
ing dead ball does not list this infrequent 
act. 

2. Play: Plan B of the reentry rule is in 
use. SI replaces Al who started the game 
and batted 6th. Later Al desires to replace 
A2 who is batting 3rd. Ruling: Al may re- 
enter only if he replaces SI and bats 6th. 

3. Play: With Rl advancing to 2nd, a pitch 
goes direct from the bat of B2 to catcher's 
mask or protector and rebounds into his mitt. 
Is this a catch and may Rl advance to 2nd? 
Ruling: Ball becomes dead when it strikes 
protector. Hence, it is neither a catch nor a 
foul tip, Rl must return to 1st. 

4. Play: Bl hits to F8 who throws his 
glove against ball. Is this a delayed dead ball? 
Ruling: If Bl reaches 3rd or home, penalty 
of awarded bases is automatically declined. 
The case is similar to other declined penalt- 
ies such as a balk or interference for which 
ball becomes retroactively dead if penalty is 
not declined. Striking ball with the detached 
glove is not listed under dead ball acts in 
5-1-1 but it probably should be to be con- 
sistent with other declined penalties. 

5. Play: With Rl on 2nd and R2 on 1st, 
B3 hits toward F6. To prevent a double play, 
Rl fields batted ball and holds or deflects it. 
May two be declared out? If so, which two? 
Ruling: For such act, R2 is out and Umpire 
should also declare the batter-runner out if 
it is obvious that the interference prevented 
a double play at 1st base. The National Al- 
liance Code does not provide for putting out 
a 2nd runner other than the batter-runner. 
This is because the status of other runners 
is too difficult to judge. Since ball becomes 
dead when the interference occurs, no run- 
ner can score. 

6. Play: Pitcher in the wind-up position 
has his non-pivot foot behind a line through 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1958 



Page Nine 



the rear edge of his plate but not directly 
behind the plate. Ruling: Not an infraction. 

7. Play: Pitcher in set position has his non- 
pivot foot in front of a line through the front 
edge of his plate but not directly in front of 
the plate. Ruling : Not an infraction. Theoret- 
ically, having the non-pivot foot at one side, 
might be so extreme that pitcher would not 
be facing the batter. In actual practice, the 
facing is legal if the foot is in front of the 
line as outlined. 

8. Play : Does a quick pitch or other illegal 
pitch always result in a ball being called? 
Ruling: Not always. If there is a runner, it 
is a balk and no ball is called. Also, with no 
runner on base, if pitch should strike the 
batter, no ball is called and batter is awarded 
1st. 

9. Play : Rl on 1st. One strike on B2. From 
set position, Fl pitches with pivot foot in 
front of pitching plate but not touching it. 
Pitch is: (a) through the strike zone; or (b) 
not through strike zone ; or (c) hit for a fly 
caught by F3, or (d) hit safely so that Rl 
advances to 3rd and B2 to 2nd. Ruling : Balk. 
In (d), balk penalty is automatically ignored. 

10. Play : Rl is on 2nd. From set position, 
Fl makes a jump turn. He lands: (a) astride 
the plate with non-pivot foot toward 2nd 
base; or (b) with both feet clearly behind 
plate. In either case, Fl feints to 2nd. Rul- 
ing : Legal. 

11. Play: Rl is on 1st. From pitching posi- 
tion, Fl throws to F5 at 3rd, who relays ball 
to 2nd where Fl tags incoming Rl. Ruling: 
Balk. 

12. Play : Fl pitches close to head of Bl in 
attempting to drive him from plate. Ruling: 
Disqualify Fl if intent sems clear. If Um- 
pire is in doubt, he should warn Fl and then 
disqualify if act is repeated. 

13. Play: Rl on 1st attempts steal of 2nd 
during pitch which is a strike. Umpire inter- 
feres with ihrow of F2 to 2nd. Rl is: (a) 
tagged; or (b) not tagged in time. Ruling: 
Strike ounts. In (a), Rl is out. In (b), if 
Umpire calls interference on himself, ball be- 
came dead and Rl must return to 1st. 

14. Play. With Rl on 3rd and R2 on 1st, 
B3 is hit by pitch. Then Rl crosses home 
base. Ruling: B3 is awarded 1st and R2 is 
forced to advance to 2nd. Rl returns to 3rd. 

15. Play: With no outs, Rl is on 1st. F7 
intentionally muffs a short fly by B2. Rl 
advances and is: (a) tagged; or (b) reaches 
2nd or 3rd. Ruling: Umpire should loudly 
announce that B3 is out. Rl is also out in (a) 
but it is a legal advance in (b). Comment: 
After an intentional muff, any runner may 



advance at his own risk without retouching 
his base. Unlike the infield fly rule, the 
intentional muff rule applies when only one 
runner is involved if he is on 1st. 

16. Play: Batted ball strikes home plate or 
in batter's box and bounces to fair ground. 
Ruling: Fair ball unless it touches batter, 
catcher or Umpire while over foul ground. 



MINUTES OF BOARD MEETING 

The Board of Control of the Kentucky 
High School Athletic Association met at 
the Kentucky Hotel, Louisville, on Friday 
morning, April 11, 1958. The meeting was 
called to order by President Russell William- 
son at 9:00, with all Board members. Com- 
missioner Theo. A. Sanford, and Ass't. Com- 
missioner J. B. Mansfield present. 

Louis Litchfield moved, seconded by Jack 
Dawson, that the reading of the minutes of 
the March 21st meeting be waived, since the 
members of the Board had received copies 
of these minutes. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

The Commissioner gave a brief report on 
State Tournament receipts and expenses. He 
stated that receipts from ticket sales will 
exceed $114,000.00, and that additional re- 
ceipts from the tournament program will 
bring total tournament receipts to approxi- 
mately $117,000.00. Profit to the Association 
on the tournament should be approximately 
$88,000.00. 

W. B. Jones moved, seconded by Robert 
Forsyth e, that the summer meeting of the 
Board of Control be held at Kentucky Lake 
State Park late in July, if lodging accommo- 
dations are available at that time. The Com- 
missioner was authorized to determine the 
dates and to advise the members of the 
Board accordingly. 

There was a discussion of possible re- 
districting in Region 7, it being mentioned 
that this region now apparently needs four 
districts instead of two. The Board deferred 
action on redistricting in Region 7 at this 
meeting, but authorized President William- 
son to appoint a committee for study, with 
power to act. 

There was a discussion concerning the 
fact that there is a probability that several 
member schools of the Association are not 
complying with the provisions of K.H.S.A.A. 
By-Law 30, which provides that the coach of 
a team shall be a duly certificated member 
of the school faculty. W. B. Jones moved, 
seconded by Louis Litchfield, that a question- 
naire concerning certification of coaches be 



Page Ten 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1958 



sent to principals of K.H.S.A.A. member 
schools prior to or early in the school year 
1958-59. The motion was carried unanimous- 

ly. 

Clyde Reeves of the State Fair Board met 
with the Board of Control to discuss the pos- 
sibility of the location of the 1959 State High 
School Basketball Tournament at Freedom 
Hall in Louisville. Mr. Reeves stated that 
there was a possibility that the N.C.A.A. 
would locate its final tournament at Freedom 
Hall on the third weekend in March, 1959, 
but that the decision concerning this would 
not be made until early in July. 

Robert Forsythe moved, seconded by Jack 
Dawson, that the Board postpone its decis- 
ion concerning the location of the 1959 State 
High School Basketball Tournament until 
the July meeting. The motion was carried. 
The voting on this motion was as follows: 
Yes (Litchfield, Dawson, Crowdus, For- 
sythe) ; No (Thornton, Jones, Gillaspie). 
President Williamson did not vote. 

Jack Dawson moved, seconded by W. B. 
Jones, that Louis Litchfield be named Dele- 
gate and K. G. Gillaspie Alternate at the 
forthcoming summer meeting of the Na- 
tional Federation. The motion was carried 
unanimously. 

W. H. Crowdus moved, seconded by Cecil 
A. Thornton, that all bills of the Associa- 
tion, beginning March 21, 1958, and ending 
April 10, 1958, be allowed. The motion was 
carried unanimously. 

The Board was then called to order in its 
capacity as Board of Directors of the 
K.H.S.A.A. Protection Fund. 

Louis Litchfield moved, seconded by W. H. 
Crowdus, that the fees and benefits of the 
Protection Fund be the same for 1958-59 as 
they were for 1957-58 ; that a credit of $30.00 
be allowed each K.H.S.A.A. member school 
insuring its athletes in the Protection Fund ; 
and that the Insurance Committee be con- 
tinued for the purpose of conducting further 
study of possible Protection Fund improve- 
ments. The motion was carried unanimous- 
ly. 

Secretary-Treasurer Sanford presented a 
list of claims which had been paid by the 
Protection Fund since March 21, 1958, the 
total amount of these claims being $1,116.58. 
Louis Litchfield moved, seconded by K. G. 
Gillaspie, that the claims as presented by the 
Secretary-Treasurer of the Protection Fund 
be allowed. The motion was carried unani- 
mously. 

There being no further business, the meet- 
ing adjourned. 



U. K. Coaching Clinic 

New emphasis on the high school level of 
coaching will keynote the annual free coaching 
clinic sponsored by the University of Kentucky Ath- 
letics Association and scheduled for UK's Memorial 
Coliseum August 6-9. 

Sharing the spotlight for the first time with 
outstanding college coaches as guest lecturers on 
the clinic staff will be the rival mentors of the 
East-West High School All-Star Football and 
Basketball Games. In addition, panels of high school 
coaches are slated for discussions on the sports of 
baseball and track along with guest leaders. 

Kentucky high school personnel on the UK 
Coaching School staff this year will include Homer 
Rice of Highlands (East Football Coach), Fred Clay- 
ton of Caldwell County (West Football Coach), 
Letcher Norton of Clark County (East Basketball 
Coach) and Gene Rhodes of Louisville St. Xavier 
(West Basketball Coach) plus coaches to be named 
to the panels conducted in baseball by Louisville's 
John Heldman and in track by Don Seaton of Ken- 
tucky and John Heber of Lexington Henry Clay. 

From the collegiate field, the clinic will offer 

instruction in football by Bill Murray, head football 
coach at Duke; Jack Curtice of Stanford, a former 
Kentucky high school coach; and the Wildcats' 
Blanton Collier and staff. Cage lectures will be 
handled by Adolph Rupp, who proved his coaching 
mastery again this past season by guiding UK to a 
record fourth NCAA title, and aide Harry Lancaster. 
The program division roughly calls for track 

and baseball discussions on the opening day, foot- 
ball Thursday from 8:30 A. M. to 9:00 P. M. and on 
Friday morning, and basketball Friday afternoon 
and Saturday morning. Football movies will be 
shown at the Wednesday and Thursday evening ses- 
sions and the traditional dinner and TV party is 
planned for Friday evening to coincide with the 
telecast of the football encounter between the pro- 
fessional champion Detroit Lions and College All- 
Stars. 

Coaches anticipating attendance at the coaching 
clinic are asked to advise the UK Athletics Associa- 
tion, indicating their expected arrival date. A limited 
number of rooms in one of the dormitories on cam- 
pus are available on a first-come, first-sei^ved basis 
at $1.50 per person per night and requests should 
be made at the earliest possible time for these rooms. 

The instructional staff lined up by UK Athletic 
Director Bernie Shively should provide the coaches 
with some new thoughts on their game. Jack Curtice 
is credited with developing flanker football to a 
high degree. His offense, as used in the Rose Bowl 
by Oregon State, features the use of option and 
belly plays from a flanker attack and he has popular- 
ized passes from plays that look like runs. At Utah 
last year, Curtice had the nation's leading passer, 
a tribute to the effectiveness of the system. 

Bill Murray, vfho has posted an outstanding 
record at Duke, features a version of Split-T and 
Drive football. His teams are noted for their ability 
to gain a lot of ground from their running attack. 

Kentucky's Adolph Rupp, whose winning avei?- 
age of better than eighty-five per cent over the past 
twenty-eight years is a tribute to his coaching 
knowledge, will lecture on the fundamentals of his 
controlled fast break offense and new concepts of 
defensive play. Harry Lancaster, assistant to Rupp 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1958 



Pagre Eleven 



since 1945, is scheduled to explain other details of 
Kentucky basketball. 

Dr. Don Cash Seaton, head of UK's Physical 
Education Department and track coach, will join 
veteran Coach John Heber in leading track discus- 
sions, while highly successful Coach John Heldman 
of the University of Louisville will be back for an- 
other year as baseball lecturer and panf' leader. 

—By Ren Kuhn 



K. H. S. C. C. A. Meetings 

Executive Committee Meeting 

Held in Lexington, March 22, 1958 

The meeting of the Executive Committee of 
the Kentucky High School Coaches Association was 
held at the Memorial Coliseum, University of Ken- 
tucky, Lexington, at 6:00 P. M. on March 22, 1958. 
Members present were: Ollie Leathers, President; 
John Hackett, Vice President; Joe Ohr, Secretary- 
Treasurer; John Meihaus, Sergeant-at-Arms; and 
Estill Branham, All-Star Manager for 1958. 

The first business to be discussed concerned the 
selection of the head coaches and the assistants for 
the East-West basketball teams. The four teams 
playing in the Saturday night games of the State 
High School Basketball Tournament were to fur- 
nish the coaches. Winning coaches were to be named 
head coaches and the losei's were to be the assistant 
coaches in the All-Star game to be played in Aug- 
ust. This selection was based on rules previously 
adopted by the Association. 

It was moved by John Meihaus and seconded 
by John Hackett that a change be made in the 
rules regarding the selection of All-Star basketball 
coaches, providing for the election of the basket- 
ball coaches in the same manner as the football 
coaches (that is, by the vote of the coaches). The 
motion was carried unanimously. This was to be- 
come effective during the 1958-59 season. 

lit was proposed that the next meeting of the 
Executive Committee be held at 4:30 P. M. (CST), 
April 9, 1958, at the Watterson Hotel in Louisville. 

There being no fui'ther business, the meeting 
adjourned at 7:15 P. M. 

Executive Committee Meeting 

Held in Louisville, April 9, 1958 

The Executive Committee of the Kentucky High 
School Coaches Association met at the Watterson 
Hotel in Louisville, April 9, 1958, at 4:45 P. M. 
(C.S.T.). 

Members present were : President Ollie Leathers, 
Vice President John Hackett, Secretary-Treasurer 
Joe Ohr, and Sergeant-At-Arms John Meihaus. 
Commissioner Ted Sanford met with the group, as 
did All-Star Basketball Coach Letcher Norton of 
Clark County and Coach Homer Rice of Highlands. 
Both coaches are to direct the East squads. 



Correction 

On page eight in the March issue of the 
ATHLETE, two of the column headings 
for the sportsmanship ratings on K.H.S.- 
A.A. member schools are incorrect. The 
heading for the first column should be 
"Coach", and the heading for the third 
column should be "Crowd." 



Coach Letcher Norton was the Coach of the 
Year ii. Basketball, as elected by the members of 
the Coaches Association, and Coach Homer Rice 
was the Coach of the Year in Football. 

A report concerning the All-Star voting was 
made by Eck Branham, showing that 67% of the 
eligible football schools voted, while only 48% 
of the basketball schools voted. 

It was moved by John Meihaus and seconded by 
John Hackett that a change be made in the method 
of selection of players making up the East and West 
teams, with the first eight basketball regions mak- 
ing up the West, and regions 9-16 making up the 
East. The motion was carried unanimously. 

The meeting adjourned at 6:00 P. M. 

Annual Business Meeting 

Held in Louisville, April 9, 1958 

The twenty-ninth annual meeting of the 
K.H.S.C.C.A. was held Wednesday night, April 9. 
1958, in the Mirror Room of the Kentucky Hotel, 
Louisville, Kentucky. Ninety members were pres- 
ent. 

A forty-five minute Talent Program was pre- 
sented to the coaches before the meeting was called 
to order. L. J. Charmoli, former All-Star Manager, 
aii-anged for the excellent progi-am. The duPont 
Manual students provided a varied and enjoyable 
program. 

President Ollie Leathers (Frankfort) called the 
meeting to order at 8:30 P. M. (C.S.T.) and asked 
that the minutes of the regular meeting and the 
Executive Committee meeting be read by Secretary 
Joe Ohr (Irvine). Ohr reminded the members pres- 
ent that the minutes of the regular meeting had 
been published in the ATHLETE, official publication 
of the Kentucky High School Athletic Association. 
It was moved by Bob Miller (Newport) and second- 
ed by Estill Branham (North Warren) that the 
reading of the minutes be waived. The motion was 
carried. The Secretary read the minutes of the 
Executive Committee meeting, and they were order- 
ed placed in the official records. 

Secretary-Treasurer Ohr made a complete finan- 
cial report covering the All-Star Account, the Ken- 
tucky High School Coaches Association Account, and 
the Kentucky High School Coaches Account (Build- 
ing and Loan Association, Covington, Kentucky). It 
was moved by Ralph McRight (Paducah) and sec- 
onded by Estill Branham that the financial report 
be accepted. The motion was carried. President 
Leathers appointed a committee of three to check 
the audit and report of the three accounts. The three 
appointed were Clarence Caple (Bowling Green), 
Bob Miller, and Edgar McNabb (Beechwood). 

President Leathers recognized Commissioner 
Theo. A. Sanford, Ass't. Commissioner J. B. Mans- 
field, and Board of Control members W. B. Jones 
(Somerset) and Russell Williamson (Inez) as visit- 
ors to the meeting. 

Coach Frank Camp, University of Louisville 
football coach, and Coach Bob Davis, Georgetown 
College Basketball Coach, addressed the members. 
Both coaches presented the members with challeng- 
ing talks. Camp spoke on "What Influence Do You, 
as a Coach. Have in Your Community," and Davis 
spoke on "Recruiting Problems of a Small College." 
These fine speakers were introduced to the assembly 
by President Leathers and John Bill Trivette (Pike- 
ville). 

The Kentucky High School Coaches Association 
for the second time recognized the "coaches of the 
year" as chosen by the vote of members of the As- 



Page Twelve 



THE KENTUCKY HIGH SCHOOL ATHLETE FOR MAY, 1958 



sociation. The election is conducted by Estill Bran- 
ham, Manager of the All-Star games. Coaches 
honored were Homer Rice (Highlands) Coach of the 
Year in Football for 1957, and Letcher Norton 
(Clark County), Coach of the Year in Basketball 
for 1958. The honored coaches were introduced by 
Bob Miller, who represented the football coaches 
of the state. 

It was moved by Edgar McNabb and seconded 
by Carl Genito (Winchester) that the Coaches As- 
sociation pi-esent to the Deleg-ate Assembly a pro- 
posal which would change Tournament Rule I by 
moving the dates of the district, regional, and state 
basketball tournaments up one week, district tour- 
neys to be played on the week preceding the first 
Fi-iday and Saturday in March. The motion carried, 
and Secretary-Treasurer Joe Ohr, an ex-officio dele- 
gate, was directed to offer the proposal to the 
Delegate Assembly. 

In accordance with a rule change passed in 
1957 by the members of the K.H.S.C.A., the officers 
move up each year, with the exception of the Sec- 
retary-Treasurer and the Sergeant-At-Arms. It was 
moved by Edgar McNabb and seconded by Ralph 
McRig-ht that Joe Ohr be re-elected Secretary- 
Treasurer. It was moved by McRight and seconded 
by Bill Hogge (Elizabethtown) that Ohr be elected 
by acclamation. The motion was carried. 

The three men nominated for the position of 
Sergeant-At-Arms were Bill Hogge, Wallace Sydnor 
(Daviess County), and George Claiborne (Daviess 
County). The members elected Wallace "Buck" 
Sydnor as the incoming Sergeant-At-arms. 

Taking office March 1, 1959, and serving until 
March 1, 1960, are: President, John Hackett (Ft. 
Knox); Vice President, John Meihaus (St. Xavier) ; 
Secretary-Treasurer, Joe Ohr (Irvine); Sergeant-At- 
Arms, Wallace Sydnor, (Daviess County), 

There being no further business, the meeting 
adjourned at 10:15 P. M. 



ANNUAL REPORT 

(Continued from Page Two) 

ed by the State Office, with the result that 
it is necessary to give an estimate of tourna- 
ment profits at this time. A complete record 
of all receipts and disbursements will appear 
in a subsequent issue of the Association 
magazine. 

One thousand, two hundred twenty-four 
basketball officials and 373 football officials 
registered with the Association in 1957-58. 
Nine football rules clinics were held under 
the direction of Mr. Thomas P. Bell and Mr. 
Edgar McNabb, and nineteen football of- 
ficials took the National Federation football 
examination for the higher ratings. The 
basketball clinics were conducted by Charlie 
Vettiner, as was the School for Basketball 
Officials. Mr. Vettiner held fifteen clinics. 
Additional meetings and clinics were held by 
the regional representatives who continued 
to render a fine service to the officials and 
schools in their respective areas. Ninety of- 
ficials took the basketball examination, with 
twelve being added to the "certified" list 
and forty-five receiving the "approved" 
rating. 



Three hundred thirty-three schools in- 
sured their athletes under the K.H.S.A.A. 
Protection Fund this year. Four thousand, 
one hundred eighty-nine boys were insured 
in football ; 6,710 in Physical Education and 
all sports except football. Seven hundred 
seventy-four claims, amounting to $17,- 
753 43, have been naid to date. This figure 
is approximately $1,100.00 more than the 
amount reported a vear ago for a comparable 
period of time. The Board of Control for 
1957-58 gave each member school insuring 
its athletes in the Protection Fund a credit 
of $30.00. To date this free insurance has 
cost the Association $12,000.00. this amount 
havinff been transferred from the General 
Fund to the Protection Fund. 

Seven schools have been suspended from 
the Association this vear. and three have 
been placed on probation. Four of the sus- 
pensions and all of the probations came ?s a 
result of the violation of K.H.S.A.A. By-Law 
17, Practice of Sportsmanship. Two of the 
schools were suspended because of the viola- 
tion of Bv-Law 5. Section 4, Preceding Se- 
mester Enrollment, and one suspension was 
the result of violation of Bv-Law 1, Section 
7-q, Certification of Ineligible Player. 

Interest in minor and spring sports con- 
tinues to increase. Peeional cross country 
runs were held in Murray. Bowling Green, 
Louisville, Morehead and Berea last Novem- 
ber for the purpose of Qualifying teams and 
individuals for the state event, which was 
held in Lexington two weeks later. Four 
schools sent entries to the Class A Section 
of the State Swimming Meet, held on Feb- 
ruarv 22 : fl^e section for Classes B and C will 
be held on April 12. One hundred fifty-four 
member schools have indicated that they 
will send teams to the twelve re<Tional track 
meets, a new high. Fortv-eieht district tour- 
naments in baseball will be held to accom- 
mod'^te the 320 teams which will enter these 
tournaments. Seventv schools will have o'olf 
teqms this spring, and these teams will enter 
«pven regional tournaments to qualify for the 
State Golf Tournament. Fortv-seven tennis 
teams will be entered in five regional tennis 
tournaments. 

19^7-f18 has been another p-ood ve^r for the 
Association. Although the State Basketball 
Tournament did not .^et a new record in at- 
tendance and i-eceipts. the finances of the 
A ssociation continue to remain in excellent 
condition because of the tournament profits. 
School representatives have been most co- 
operative in assisting the Board of Control 
and the Commissioner with the program of 
the Association. 



Wg ShipThb Day You BuV" 

HUNT'S ATHLETIC GOODS CO., Inc. 

103 — PHONES — 104 

MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 



I Just a note of thanks to our many friends who have made the 

i 1957-58 school year the best in our history. We thank you for the nice 

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I our salesmen will be glad to call and give you any information and assist- 

I ance you may need. 



Hunt's Athletic Goods Co. 

INCDRPORATED 

Phone 103 
MAYFIELD, KENTUCKY 

THE LARGEST EXCLUSIVE ATHLETIC HOUSE IN THE SOUTH' 









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ORDER YOUR FALL ATHLETIC 
EQUIPMENT JVOIV 

HAVE A HAPPIER VACATION 

oon the Summer vacation period will be in full swing all over Kentuckj 
^e hope your vacation will be pleasant, refreshing and relaxing. 

ne thing that can add to your pleasure is to eliminate all worry abou 
all Athletic Equipment before you close up shop. Check over your Foot 
all and Basketball equipment now. Order what you need. Then tha 
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pens in the Fall. We'll be glad to be of service. Let us hear from you 

A Personal Note 

/e want to thank you, our friends the Superintendents, Principals an 
oaches, for the many orders you have placed with us during the pas 
;hool year. We appreciate it. We have enjoyed the pleasant associatior 
ie shall do everything possible to deserve your continnued confidence 

you need personal Summer vacation equipment, drop us a line. 

was good to have been able to renew acquaintance with so many o 
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(OTHE 

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LOUISVILLE 1, KENTUCKY 


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